Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCornmeal
IN THE NEWS

Cornmeal

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,special to the sun | September 21, 2005
Jerry Barkdoll from Baltimore was trying to track down a recipe for a Cajun dish that her husband used to enjoy when he lived in Louisiana years ago. It was a fluffy cornmeal mush that was commonly served for breakfast or as a light supper. Several readers seemed to recognize this dish, which is called Couche-Couche. Elizabeth Gay of Baltimore sent in a recipe from her Cajun cookbook that fits the description perfectly. The dish is quite similar to grits but it has a courser texture and a distinctive cornmeal taste.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2013
With about 10 jalapenos already in the fridge and a small basket of fresh tomatillos coming in the new weekly pickup from Cockeysville's Moon Valley Farm, I knew I had some sort of Tex-Mex meal in my future. But I'd never cooked with tomatillos before and wasn't quite sure what to do with them. I searched the cookbooks on my shelf and in "Just Tacos: 100 Delicious Recipes for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner," by Shelley Wiseman (Taunton Press, 2011) found a recipe for tacos with chopped fish and tomatillo "salad.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 18, 1999
My mother used cornmeal often when she cooked. She baked round loaves of corn bread as well as slim corn-bread sticks. She dusted egg-dipped eggplant strips and sliced okra with cornmeal before frying these vegetables. And, for the holidays, she always made corn bread dressing.I follow her Southern tradition and find countless uses for cornmeal in my kitchen. Recently, I bought fresh rainbow trout and coated the fillets with cornmeal and flour before pan-frying them. The fish with their crispy, golden cornmeal crust were so appealing that I've decided to serve them again, this time for company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2010
Richard Clayton from Odenton was looking for a recipe for making Spoon Bread from scratch. Rita Gifford from Timonium sent in a recipe that she said was given to her by a former professor many years. The recipe was written and fired on a decorative ceramic plague and she has had it hanging in her kitchen for 20-plus years. Although called "bread," the classic Southern-style spoon bread is closer in consistency and taste to a savory pudding or soufflé. It is meant to be served with a spoon hot out of the oven, hence the name.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | July 26, 1998
One of the most important staples in my mother's pantry was cornmeal. A Southern cook, she used it to make corn bread, or she would coat slices of okra with cornmeal before frying them.She also included it in a batter for julienned eggplant, which she sauteed in hot oil. I love the slightly crunchy texture that this ground grain imparts to a dish and find that today I reach for cornmeal in my cupboard almost as often as my mom did.A few weekends ago I invited friends for a Saturday night porch supper at our house and began our dinner with crispy Corn and Zucchini Cakes.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | June 20, 1993
Fanciful herb vinegars, pork-cooking demonstrations, cornmeal grinders and a whole lot more drew a crowd that remained steady into the early afternoon at the Carroll County Farmer's Market yesterday.Opening day of the market's 22nd season featured the pork-cooking demonstrations, as well as Harry Hahn's assortment of old-fashioned cornmeal grinders operating in an open-sided trailer.Mr. Hahn, of Taneytown, took up corn-grinding as a hobby several years ago.He now takes his grinders to festivals and farmers markets around the region, selling his cornmeal in 1-pound bags for $1."
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Evans and Elizabeth Evans,Orange County Register | October 20, 1999
It's hard to believe now, in these days of pricey polenta and trendy tamales, but cornmeal was once reviled by early European immigrants to North America.Raised on wheat flour, colonists couldn't stomach the sandlike meal made from corn. Wheat flour made such soft, pretty cakes and bread. Corn products were leaden in comparison. No yeast could make the stuff rise, and cooked in primitive ovens or on skillets -- sometimes even hoes -- set in the ashes of a fireplace, these biscuits were more like hardtack than the pillowy, chewy bread 17th-century Europeans were used to.Even pioneers, who should have been used to the hard life, found living on cornmeal almost unbearable.
FEATURES
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | April 12, 1995
The cheese souffle was created in France in the late 1800s, before people became aware of the health risks of a fat-rich diet.A classic cheese souffle is made with a trio of fattening ingredients -- eggs, butter and cheese -- which make up 68 percent of the calories in the dish. There are few ingredients, other than a splash of milk and a few tablespoons of flour, to cut the proportion of fat. A single serving has more than 18 grams of fat and 246 calories.However, with a little tweaking, even souffle can be made lighter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2013
With about 10 jalapenos already in the fridge and a small basket of fresh tomatillos coming in the new weekly pickup from Cockeysville's Moon Valley Farm, I knew I had some sort of Tex-Mex meal in my future. But I'd never cooked with tomatillos before and wasn't quite sure what to do with them. I searched the cookbooks on my shelf and in "Just Tacos: 100 Delicious Recipes for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner," by Shelley Wiseman (Taunton Press, 2011) found a recipe for tacos with chopped fish and tomatillo "salad.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | October 16, 1991
POLENTA IS a trendy dish.Once considered a "poor man's food," polenta now shows up on fine china in the most elegant of restaurants in Baltimore and throughout the country as an appetizer or the centerpiece of a main course. A highly satisfying food made from cornmeal, polenta is preferred over pasta or bread in certain regions of Italy, notably the Veneto and Friuli regions.Depending on the cornmeal used, the texture of polenta can be either coarse or fine. Using a mixture of both can result in a just-right combination.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun reporter | June 6, 2007
On the tip of his finger, Matt Lee balances a corn kernel. Candlelight travels through the translucent grain, turning it into a Day-Glo specimen for Lee's discourse on the "anatomy of a grit." The powdery stuff on the kernel's ridge that "looks like a French pedicure" is corn flour, he says. Then, sifting through a cup of coarse, stone-ground corn, Lee finds the "hard, glassy protein part" that comprises grits, along with bits of hull and black specks of stem-ends, where the kernel grew from the cob. When Matt Lee and his brother Ted hold cooking demonstrations to promote their recent cookbook, they make their own grits with a hand grinder and give this same lesson.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | May 27, 2007
It's soft-shell crab season in Maryland. Benjamin Erjavec, executive chef of the Oceanaire Seafood Room in Harbor East, has this simple way to dress them up. CORNMEAL-CRUSTED MARYLAND SOFT-SHELL CRABS WITH TARRAGON BEURRE BLANC Serves 6 as an appetizer or 3 as a main course 6 soft-shell crabs, cleaned 2 cups buttermilk 1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns 1 bay leaf 1 tablespoon chopped garlic 1/2 cup white wine 1/4 cup heavy cream 1/2 pound...
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2005
Scott Lane from Des Moines, Iowa, was looking for a recipe for Indian pudding, a dessert he remembers fondly from his college days in New England. There are many variations to Indian pudding, but it always is made using cornmeal and milk and sometimes eggs. Barbara Ruffner from Greensburg, Pa., had a recipe for the classic comfort food that Lane is sure to enjoy. It does not contain eggs but does use maple syrup and raisins, both of which gave the pudding a wonderful flavor and aroma. It's best to serve it warm with vanilla ice cream.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,special to the sun | September 21, 2005
Jerry Barkdoll from Baltimore was trying to track down a recipe for a Cajun dish that her husband used to enjoy when he lived in Louisiana years ago. It was a fluffy cornmeal mush that was commonly served for breakfast or as a light supper. Several readers seemed to recognize this dish, which is called Couche-Couche. Elizabeth Gay of Baltimore sent in a recipe from her Cajun cookbook that fits the description perfectly. The dish is quite similar to grits but it has a courser texture and a distinctive cornmeal taste.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2004
An enormous pot blows off steam on Susanna Cruz's stove as her extended family trickles in from work and school. If it were summertime in any other Maryland household, the 36-quart vaporera might hold that day's crab harvest. But it is Christmastime, and in Anne Arundel County, where the Hispanic population has more than doubled in the last decade, Susanna Cruz and her sister Rosalie are making dozens of tamales - cornmeal dough stuffed with something spicy or sweet, wrapped in corn husks and steamed.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | September 28, 2003
Please help. I say ovens, electric frying pans and the like should be brought up to temperature before you put whatever you are going to cook in them. My wife says put the food in and then turn it on. Who is right, and why? Before I begin, let me just say that there are exceptions to every rule. Let's start with frying pans, both electric and conventional. There are many reasons to start with a hot pan, such as preventing your food from sticking and getting it to form a nice brown crust.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | May 27, 2007
It's soft-shell crab season in Maryland. Benjamin Erjavec, executive chef of the Oceanaire Seafood Room in Harbor East, has this simple way to dress them up. CORNMEAL-CRUSTED MARYLAND SOFT-SHELL CRABS WITH TARRAGON BEURRE BLANC Serves 6 as an appetizer or 3 as a main course 6 soft-shell crabs, cleaned 2 cups buttermilk 1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns 1 bay leaf 1 tablespoon chopped garlic 1/2 cup white wine 1/4 cup heavy cream 1/2 pound...
FEATURES
By Joan Drake and Joan Drake,Los Angeles Times | April 19, 1992
Italian polenta is very similar to American cornmeal mush. In fact, when polenta meal isn't available, stone-ground yellow cornmeal, available in many health food stores, may be substituted.But polenta wasn't always made from corn. Before corn was introduced from the Americas, polenta was made from barley (in Latin, "polenta" meant simply "barley flour"), millet or even ground chestnuts.Traditionally, polenta is cooked in a round-bottomed copper pan, or "paiolo." But you can get good results using a heavy saucepan.
NEWS
October 30, 2002
NOW THAT evening temperatures are diving into the 30s, it is time to pick the green tomatoes. That raises the question of whether to fry them Yankee-style, with flour and low-fat milk, or fry them Southern-style, with cornmeal and buttermilk. It is a question addressed by Crescent Dragonwagon in her new cookbook, Passionate Vegetarian (Workman Publishing Co. Inc., 2002, $24.95). Dragonwagon is a Yankee by birth who has become a longtime resident of the South. Born as Ellen Zolotow, she grew up in New York but changed her name as a teen-ager to Crescent Dragonwagon and moved to Arkansas.
NEWS
By JIM COLEMAN AND CANDACE HAGAN and JIM COLEMAN AND CANDACE HAGAN,Knight Ridder / Tribune | September 22, 2002
Q. Restaurants that serve "poppers" (fried, breaded hot peppers stuffed with cheese) must buy them from commercial suppliers. The brands in the freezer section of grocery stores are not as good. The peppers are tough and do not seem to be truly stuffed. I have tried making poppers at home, but I have trouble with the breading -- it does not stick, the peppers get soggy, etc. What am I doing wrong? A. Yes, restaurants (and even more bars) do buy poppers from large distributors. The best commercial brand is called Anchor, so if you ever see them in a store, that's the one to buy. However, these little guys are easy to make at home.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.