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By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2013
A small plane landed upside down in a Bowie cornfield on Saturday morning, though none of the plane's four occupants were injured, Maryland State Police said. The single engine Cessna Skyhawk plane was attempting to land at the Freeway Airport in the 3900 block of Church Road in Bowie at about 10 a.m. when it missed the runway and landed about 100 feet away, State Police said. Federal aviation officials are investigating the crash and the State Police said it's not yet clear why the plane missed the runway.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2013
A small plane landed upside down in a Bowie cornfield on Saturday morning, though none of the plane's four occupants were injured, Maryland State Police said. The single engine Cessna Skyhawk plane was attempting to land at the Freeway Airport in the 3900 block of Church Road in Bowie at about 10 a.m. when it missed the runway and landed about 100 feet away, State Police said. Federal aviation officials are investigating the crash and the State Police said it's not yet clear why the plane missed the runway.
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NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | September 22, 1992
Troy D. Shellington, the second man charged in last year's "cornfield murder," pleaded guilty in Westminster yesterday to murder in commission of a felony and was immediately sentenced to life in prison.The prosecution reached an agreement with Shellington in which he pleaded guilty in the slaying last summer of Margaret E. Cullen, 74, of Homeland.Her body was found buried in a cornfield near Hampstead, Carroll County.In exchange, Carroll County State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman agreed to dismiss seven other charges against Shellington, of the 3600 block of Cottage Ave., including first-degree murder and kidnapping.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2012
A 56-year-old Maryland man was killed Sunday when a small plane crashed into a cornfield near York, Pa., York County authorities reported. The man, who has not been identified pending notification of his family, was the lone occupant of a Piper PA-28 180 that crashed about 12:42 p.m. near the York airport in Jackson Township. The National Transportation Safety Board announced on Twitter that it would investigate the crash. The small plane crash is the second to occur in the township in the last two months.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | August 19, 1992
Prosecutors in the Carroll County State's Attorney's office call it "the cornfield case."They identify the crime in that manner because the decomposed body of 74-year-old Margaret E. Cullen was found last August in a cornfield along Route 30 in Hampstead.Yesterday, testimony began in the trial of Abras Morrison, 21, one of two men charged in the slaying of Mrs. Cullen, a longtime resident of Homeland in North Baltimore.Mr. Morrison, of the 6000 block of Lanette Road in Baltimore County, and Troy Dominic Shellington, 21, of the 3600 block of Cottage Ave. in Baltimore, were charged last August with first-degree murder and kidnapping in Mrs. Cullen's death.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | August 23, 1992
The defendant in the "cornfield case" testified Friday that Baltimore homicide detectives denied him access to a lawyer, never told him his rights and coerced a taped confession from him admitting participation in the murder of an elderly North Baltimore woman last summer."
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1997
The pilot and a female passenger were injured yesterday when a glider crashed in a cornfield while trying to land at Woodbine Glider Port off Gillis Falls Road, state police said.Cpl. Tim Selby of the Westminster Barracks said the two, in their mid-50s and from Reston, Va., were in a Schweizer twin-seater glider about 3 p.m. when the pilot tried to land. Selby said they had been in the air about 15 to 20 minutes after detaching from the tow plane.Selby said the glider missed the landing strip and crashed into a cornfield near the glider port.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2000
A Washington man was sentenced to life in prison yesterday - with all but 40 years suspended - in a plea agreement in the shooting death of a man whose body was found in a South County cornfield in July 1999. Darron Terrell Williams, 30, of the first block of Riggs Roads N.E. entered an Alford plea to first-degree murder before Judge Clayton Greene Jr. in county Circuit Court - conceding that the state's evidence was strong enough for conviction but not admitting guilt. The victim, Curtis Ray Rawlings, 35, of Southeast Washington, was found shot in the head - his body surrounded by 9 mm shell casings - in a cornfield along Plummer Lane in Lothian on July 9, 1999.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1997
Over a Carroll County cornfield yesterday, kites soared hundreds of feet in the air, fluttered perilously close to treetops and sometimes crashed to the dusty ground.It was the 12th annual "April Kite Sail," courtesy of kite enthusiast Bill Cunningham, who invites friends, family and kite lovers to join him each year for a high-flying rite of spring on a Manchester hilltop.Cunningham, who describes himself as 40-something, always schedules the "kite sail" for the third Sunday in April, when, according to the Farmers Almanac, good weather is a good bet. The almanac isn't always right -- veteran kite sailors recall some rainy, cold days -- but yesterday didn't disappoint.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 3, 2002
You're lost. You don't know where you are, where you've been or where you need to go. In fact, you have been wandering aimlessly for close to two hours. You feel as if you've been going in circles. You have absolutely no idea how to break out of the trap you're in. You're also having the time of your life. Call it the corn-maze craze. People who normally don't like getting lost - and who does? - are entering these confounding cornfields by the thousands. They're all over the country and all around the Baltimore area.
SPORTS
October 13, 2009
'Field of Dreams' 5:30 p.m. [AMC] Sure, historical inaccuracies abound in this Kevin Costner movie about a man who turns a cornfield into a baseball field to reconnect with his father. But who cares that the young Doc Graham has dark brown eyes and the old one has blue eyes if you end up wiping your own in the end?
TRAVEL
By Diane Daniel and Diane Daniel,special to the sun | July 6, 2008
Say Maryland's Eastern Shore, and crab comes to mind. But on a recent trip, 10 traveling cyclists discovered that another four-letter food starting with C is more plentiful in the coastal areas of Maryland and Delaware. Corn, oceans of it, with soybean fields thrown in. "There's too much corn," declared 7-year-old Olivia Howe, arms outstretched toward the fields as we rolled by. "Everywhere I look, there's corn." Granted, Olivia, who lives in Brattleboro, Vt., didn't always have the best view on our six-day bicycle trip.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | July 18, 2006
On Sunday's steamy afternoon, Greg Dean headed north with two friends and three inner tubes for what was supposed to be a cool and lazy float down the Gunpowder. Yesterday, Dean recalled a night of misadventure that left him and one of his pals stranded in a cornfield, coaxing a fire from some husks and trying to stay warm - and calm -as rescuers searched the woods and water for the castaways. "We just sat there and thought, `What can we do?'" said Dean, a 22-year-old stocker at a liquor store.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
Larry and Linda Webster have spent more than two decades transforming a dusty cornfield into 20 acres of lush gardens that they will show off tomorrow to about 700 guests on the annual Maryland House and Garden Pilgrimage. For the past few weeks, the Websters have been planting, pruning, and mulching to prepare their grounds to be one of 12 stops on the Carroll County segment of the tour. The pilgrimage, which includes more than 100 homes and gardens throughout the state, moves Saturday to horse country in Baltimore and Harford counties, the last stops on the 68th annual tour that began April 23 in Kent County, then moved to Calvert and continued through Howard County last week.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | December 7, 2004
NOW IS THE roughest time of the year. Yesterday, as close as Bill Ey can tell, he had a birthday. Next week comes an anniversary. It will be 69 years since the snowy night somebody telephoned the old St. Vincent Infant Home and said there was a baby waiting outside in the dark. A policeman with a flashlight found the little boy wrapped in a blanket in a nearby cornfield, with two warm bottles of milk lying next to him. All labels had been cut from the child's clothes and blankets, to avoid identification.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2004
Volunteers have created an old-fashioned maze using a global positioning system to mow familiar farm scenes into a 17-acre cornfield in Westminster. With flashlights, maps and the promise of rescue, visitors can wend their way through yellowing stalks that give way to patterns of a barn, a silo, a windmill, a steer's horned head and the letters that spell Carroll County. Few will take time to decipher the corny scenery, preferring to concentrate on finding a way out of the tightly planted rows of maize.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 23, 2002
Frederick police are trying to identify a man whose decomposing body was found Saturday afternoon in a recently harvested cornfield off South Market Street. Documents found at the scene indicate that the man was alive in late June. Investigators believe that he was dead when the several-acre field was harvested Sept. 16, said Lt. Thomas Chase. The body was found about 150 yards from the road, in a cornfield between a Costco store and the Maryland School for the Deaf, he said. The state medical examiner's office determined that the man was African-American, between the ages of 20 and 40, and about 6 feet tall, police said.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | August 8, 2004
Caroline Benson's mantra is "This was all a cornfield." y She uses it often as she shows visitors around Knightly Farm, near Easton, where she lives with her husband, Charles, their dog, a horse and 20 peacocks. The fabulous gardens in back of the house -- once a cornfield -- lead the eye down to the water's edge, a quiet creek called Leeds. "The house is a long way from the water by Eastern Shore standards," explains Benson. "We needed a way to get there." The solution was a classic English parterre garden in four parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 3, 2002
You're lost. You don't know where you are, where you've been or where you need to go. In fact, you have been wandering aimlessly for close to two hours. You feel as if you've been going in circles. You have absolutely no idea how to break out of the trap you're in. You're also having the time of your life. Call it the corn-maze craze. People who normally don't like getting lost - and who does? - are entering these confounding cornfields by the thousands. They're all over the country and all around the Baltimore area.
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