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NEWS
by Annie Linskey | December 4, 2012
When Gov. Martin O'Malley is stumped for a fact or a word, he typically cocks his head, turns to the side and says: "Rick. " That would be long-time aide Rick Abbruzzese, a staffer so deeply familiar with O'Malley's thinking that -- more often than not -- he can cough up the answer even if he hardly seems to be paying attention. No more. Word spread today that Abbruzzese is leaving O'Malley-land to work for the lobbying firm Rifkin, Livingston, Levitan and Silver. There Abbruzzese will join O'Malley alum Josh White , who managed the governor's 2006 gubernatorial campaign.
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NEWS
by Annie Linskey | December 4, 2012
When Gov. Martin O'Malley is stumped for a fact or a word, he typically cocks his head, turns to the side and says: "Rick. " That would be long-time aide Rick Abbruzzese, a staffer so deeply familiar with O'Malley's thinking that -- more often than not -- he can cough up the answer even if he hardly seems to be paying attention. No more. Word spread today that Abbruzzese is leaving O'Malley-land to work for the lobbying firm Rifkin, Livingston, Levitan and Silver. There Abbruzzese will join O'Malley alum Josh White , who managed the governor's 2006 gubernatorial campaign.
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NEWS
By Stephen Hunter and Special to The Sun | May 10, 2012
I still fear the Gray Man. Three out of five days, he invades my dreams. It's always the same. I'm running after him down the mausoleum-dark hallway of the fifth floor of The Sun building. He's solitary, his slumped spine signifying disappointment. "I'm sorry!" I'm yelling, "I'll never do it again!" But he disappears into the elevator and I am left without absolution. I first met the Gray Man in May, possibly June, of 1971. He was the editor of a curious journalistic entity known as The Sunday Sun , internally and culturally distinct from The Sun or The Evening Sun . He had a corner office in a newsroom that seemed staffed by corpses and ghosts.
NEWS
By Stephen Hunter and Special to The Sun | May 10, 2012
I still fear the Gray Man. Three out of five days, he invades my dreams. It's always the same. I'm running after him down the mausoleum-dark hallway of the fifth floor of The Sun building. He's solitary, his slumped spine signifying disappointment. "I'm sorry!" I'm yelling, "I'll never do it again!" But he disappears into the elevator and I am left without absolution. I first met the Gray Man in May, possibly June, of 1971. He was the editor of a curious journalistic entity known as The Sunday Sun , internally and culturally distinct from The Sun or The Evening Sun . He had a corner office in a newsroom that seemed staffed by corpses and ghosts.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
Right after Veterans Day, volunteers at the Dundalk- Patapsco Neck Historical Society Museum drag out the ladder and lower dozens of boxes stowed in a hard-to-reach attic. Then they get to work building a train garden, piece by piece, that includes some 10,000 tiny trees, houses, figures and, of course, locomotives, cars and cabooses. It takes about three weeks to set up the elaborate scenes, many of which are animated, in what are probably the smallest quarters in the area for such a display.
NEWS
By David Simon, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
His great sin is that he never looked the part: The ruddy complexion and the insubordinate hair and that godawful mustache that should never have belonged to anyone with more solemnity and poise than an East Baltimore Street pimp, drunk and luckless, down to his last working girl. The wardrobe was disastrous. He made the rest of the slumming metro veterans look almost plausible. His laugh was a cackle, employed liberally against the farts and foibles of the important and famous.
NEWS
October 12, 1991
The routine exclusion of blacks from the region's corporate power structure continues. A year-long study released last month by the Investing in Baltimore Committee, a non-profit business group, pegs the number of black managers in the Baltimore metropolitan area at about 5 percent. That compares with 14 percent for whites.This report contains few surprises. It confirms the absence of black players in the upper echelons of management. In doing so, it refutes the fantasy that equal opportunity has translated into anything but the status quo in the corner offices and board rooms of the region's largest companies.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2010
Corporate Office Properties Trust of Columbia announced Tuesday that it has acquired The Rappahannock Building, a 152,000-square-foot office building in Tysons Corner, Va., for $40 million. The six-story building at 1550 Westbranch Drive is 100 percent leased to the MITRE Corp. This is COPT's second acquisition in Tysons Corner, after the Pinnacle Towers, which it bought in 2005. COPT now controls about 600,000 square feet of space in Tysons Corner. COPT officials say the latest acquisition is consistent with the company's strategy of developing and acquiring properties leased primarily to tenants in the U. S. government, defense and data sectors.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1997
Anne Arundel County's new courthouse is still being built, but a tour of the site provides two lessons: Seniority has its benefits, and security has its price.The five-story complex that will transform the Annapolis skyline is slated to open Aug. 1, said Robert G. Wallace, court administrator.A walk through the unfinished brick-and-glass structure tucked behind the courthouse at Church Circle reveals that the most senior judges will be awarded the choicest office space: corner chambers with views of the water.
NEWS
By Norris West and Joe Nawrozki and Norris West and Joe Nawrozki,Evening Sun Staff | August 7, 1991
15-year-old runaway was shot and critically wounded today by a Howard County police officer after the teen allegedly ran into another officer with a stolen car and knocked him down near the community of Lisbon.The youth was flown by Maryland State Police helicopter to the Shock-Trauma Unit in Baltimore, where he was listed in critical condition with an upper-torso wound from the officer's 9mm weapon.The two officers involved in the chase and shooting were taken to Howard County General Hospital, where they were treated for unspecified injuries and released.
NEWS
By David Simon, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
His great sin is that he never looked the part: The ruddy complexion and the insubordinate hair and that godawful mustache that should never have belonged to anyone with more solemnity and poise than an East Baltimore Street pimp, drunk and luckless, down to his last working girl. The wardrobe was disastrous. He made the rest of the slumming metro veterans look almost plausible. His laugh was a cackle, employed liberally against the farts and foibles of the important and famous.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
Right after Veterans Day, volunteers at the Dundalk- Patapsco Neck Historical Society Museum drag out the ladder and lower dozens of boxes stowed in a hard-to-reach attic. Then they get to work building a train garden, piece by piece, that includes some 10,000 tiny trees, houses, figures and, of course, locomotives, cars and cabooses. It takes about three weeks to set up the elaborate scenes, many of which are animated, in what are probably the smallest quarters in the area for such a display.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2010
Corporate Office Properties Trust of Columbia announced Tuesday that it has acquired The Rappahannock Building, a 152,000-square-foot office building in Tysons Corner, Va., for $40 million. The six-story building at 1550 Westbranch Drive is 100 percent leased to the MITRE Corp. This is COPT's second acquisition in Tysons Corner, after the Pinnacle Towers, which it bought in 2005. COPT now controls about 600,000 square feet of space in Tysons Corner. COPT officials say the latest acquisition is consistent with the company's strategy of developing and acquiring properties leased primarily to tenants in the U. S. government, defense and data sectors.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1997
Anne Arundel County's new courthouse is still being built, but a tour of the site provides two lessons: Seniority has its benefits, and security has its price.The five-story complex that will transform the Annapolis skyline is slated to open Aug. 1, said Robert G. Wallace, court administrator.A walk through the unfinished brick-and-glass structure tucked behind the courthouse at Church Circle reveals that the most senior judges will be awarded the choicest office space: corner chambers with views of the water.
NEWS
October 12, 1991
The routine exclusion of blacks from the region's corporate power structure continues. A year-long study released last month by the Investing in Baltimore Committee, a non-profit business group, pegs the number of black managers in the Baltimore metropolitan area at about 5 percent. That compares with 14 percent for whites.This report contains few surprises. It confirms the absence of black players in the upper echelons of management. In doing so, it refutes the fantasy that equal opportunity has translated into anything but the status quo in the corner offices and board rooms of the region's largest companies.
NEWS
By Norris West and Joe Nawrozki and Norris West and Joe Nawrozki,Evening Sun Staff | August 7, 1991
15-year-old runaway was shot and critically wounded today by a Howard County police officer after the teen allegedly ran into another officer with a stolen car and knocked him down near the community of Lisbon.The youth was flown by Maryland State Police helicopter to the Shock-Trauma Unit in Baltimore, where he was listed in critical condition with an upper-torso wound from the officer's 9mm weapon.The two officers involved in the chase and shooting were taken to Howard County General Hospital, where they were treated for unspecified injuries and released.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 12, 1995
Princeton, N.J. -- Edward Witten, who may be the smartest man in the world, seems slightly puzzled by the question put to him: How, his interrogator wants to know, would he describe a typical day in the life of a theoretical physicist? The question is followed by a long silence, one that threatens to turn uncomfortable. It fills his large, corner office at the Institute for Advanced Study, a theoretical research center that is home to a small group of the world's finest thinkers.Which is what Dr. Witten is doing right now: thinking before he answers the question.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and James Drew and Tricia Bishop and James Drew,Sun reporters | June 8, 2008
Millionaire entrepreneur Alan Fabian strode from the main house on his North Carolina beach property last August to deliver the bad news to a colleague vacationing in a guest cottage. In a brief conversation, Fabian told employee Greg Barr that he was leaving for a few days to face an indictment for fraud in a Baltimore federal court. But he assured Barr that things would be OK. "He was supremely confident and saying that it was basically a misunderstanding," said Barr, who worked for Fabian at a Maryland nonprofit.
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