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By Luke Broadwater | July 25, 2011
On weekday mornings, I'll post the most controversial, shocking and (of course) ridiculous stories for your reading pleasure. That way, when you walk into work, you'll be the master of witty conversation. Articles  • Don't worry. He doesn't call me back either: Cornel West pissed Obama won't call him back. ( New York Times )  • Gotta say I'm rooting for T-Paw: Bachmann vs. Pawlenty feud gets ugly. ( ABC)   • Well, this sucks: Time travel's not possible, scientists say. ( Gawker )
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah LaCorte, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
The razor-sharp satirists behind "The Onion" and a former director of the embattled National Security Agency are among this spring's speakers in the Johns Hopkins University's Foreign Affairs Symposium, a series of free public lectures. Students selected the guests for the symposium, titled "Confronting Global Dissonance: The Balance between Realism and Idealism. " The schedule features: •Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, Feb. 19. The two-term governor has given indications of a potential run for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016.
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NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | December 2, 2007
Cornel West sits on a bare stage at the Baltimore Museum of Art, bobbing his trademark Afro hard to the voice of Prince. Talk-show host and political commentator Tavis Smiley is beside his scholarly friend, nodding his head with equal exuberance. During a recent listening party in Baltimore, West has put aside his Princeton University classroom for the world of hip-hop music. He is promoting his second album, Never Forget: A Journey of Revelations, at a fundraiser for the Baltimore nonprofit Civic Frame, which uses media arts and intellectual work to encourage civic dialogue and critical thinking about social issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | July 25, 2011
On weekday mornings, I'll post the most controversial, shocking and (of course) ridiculous stories for your reading pleasure. That way, when you walk into work, you'll be the master of witty conversation. Articles  • Don't worry. He doesn't call me back either: Cornel West pissed Obama won't call him back. ( New York Times )  • Gotta say I'm rooting for T-Paw: Bachmann vs. Pawlenty feud gets ugly. ( ABC)   • Well, this sucks: Time travel's not possible, scientists say. ( Gawker )
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah LaCorte, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
The razor-sharp satirists behind "The Onion" and a former director of the embattled National Security Agency are among this spring's speakers in the Johns Hopkins University's Foreign Affairs Symposium, a series of free public lectures. Students selected the guests for the symposium, titled "Confronting Global Dissonance: The Balance between Realism and Idealism. " The schedule features: •Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, Feb. 19. The two-term governor has given indications of a potential run for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | January 9, 2002
Tavis Smiley has launched his new program on National Public Radio in style. Smiley's debut show Monday featured a lengthy interview with Cornel West, the distinguished Harvard University professor who is in a public tangle with the university's new president. After Harvard President Lawrence Summers' pointed inquiries about West's political activities, West and several of his colleagues issued a statement saying they would consider leaving the Cambridge, Mass., campus. But Smiley was the first to interview West, and his remarks were excerpted on NPR's main newscasts and quoted widely elsewhere.
NEWS
March 3, 2002
Professor David Carrasco of Harvard University will present the 2002 Honors Program Lecture at 8 p.m. Tuesday in McDaniel Lounge at Western Maryland College. The lecture, "Education for Liberation: God, Cornel West and Latinos at Harvard University," is free. Carrasco, a 1967 graduate of Western Maryland College, will discuss the educational vision of African-American philosopher of religion Cornel West, also a Harvard professor. He also will address the recent confrontation between West and Harvard President Lawrence H. Summers.
NEWS
March 3, 2002
Bush to name 4 to board at Naval Academy President Bush has announced his intention to appoint four new members to the Naval Academy Board of Visitors. The appointees are: Michael S. Steele of Maryland, for the remainder of a three-year term ending Dec. 30, 2003; Tirso Del Junco of California, for the remainder of a three-year term ending Dec. 30, 2002; Frederick Meyer of Texas, for the remainder of a three-year term ending Dec. 30, 2003; and Jane E. Newman of New Hampshire, for the remainder of a three-year term, ending Dec. 30, 2003.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 9, 2002
MIAMI - Cornel West, one of the nation's most prominent black intellectuals, told black professionals yesterday that they must have the courage to keep fighting for members of their community still trapped by poverty and injustice. Telling about 100 executives participating in the two-day Impact Marketing Retreat that "you can take off the masks you wear during the week," West said he recognized that many middle-class blacks are caught between "a calling and a career. We walk a tightrope."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts | September 5, 2008
Most Americans know about James West and Kanye West and maybe even Cornel West. This fall, they'll be introduced to Franz West, an Austrian artist with a penchant for turning sculpture into a social experience. The Baltimore Museum of Art is mounting the first major U.S. retrospective on the work of this internationally acclaimed artist, who manipulates found objects, papier mache and furniture to create forms that become environments unto themselves, and whose collages reflect the influence of mass media, comic books, pop culture and advertising.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts | September 5, 2008
Most Americans know about James West and Kanye West and maybe even Cornel West. This fall, they'll be introduced to Franz West, an Austrian artist with a penchant for turning sculpture into a social experience. The Baltimore Museum of Art is mounting the first major U.S. retrospective on the work of this internationally acclaimed artist, who manipulates found objects, papier mache and furniture to create forms that become environments unto themselves, and whose collages reflect the influence of mass media, comic books, pop culture and advertising.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | December 2, 2007
Cornel West sits on a bare stage at the Baltimore Museum of Art, bobbing his trademark Afro hard to the voice of Prince. Talk-show host and political commentator Tavis Smiley is beside his scholarly friend, nodding his head with equal exuberance. During a recent listening party in Baltimore, West has put aside his Princeton University classroom for the world of hip-hop music. He is promoting his second album, Never Forget: A Journey of Revelations, at a fundraiser for the Baltimore nonprofit Civic Frame, which uses media arts and intellectual work to encourage civic dialogue and critical thinking about social issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lizzie Skurnick and Lizzie Skurnick,Special to the Sun | February 13, 2005
The Professor's Daughter By Emily Raboteau. Henry Holt & Co. 278 pages. $24. The author whose biography nearly mirrors that of her protagonist plays a dangerous game. Memories have as good a chance as imaginings to bloom into a successful piece of fiction, but a novel in which circumstances and characters are readily identified can seem like a half-hearted memoir. In Emily Raboteau's The Professor's Daughter, the sections that diverge from the author's life are by far the most absorbing, and the specter of the author -- who, like Emma Boudreaux, was raised in Princeton, attended Yale and, as the product of a black father and a white mother, looks neither white nor black -- rises so frequently, one wonders why one genre won out over the other.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 9, 2002
MIAMI - Cornel West, one of the nation's most prominent black intellectuals, told black professionals yesterday that they must have the courage to keep fighting for members of their community still trapped by poverty and injustice. Telling about 100 executives participating in the two-day Impact Marketing Retreat that "you can take off the masks you wear during the week," West said he recognized that many middle-class blacks are caught between "a calling and a career. We walk a tightrope."
NEWS
March 3, 2002
Bush to name 4 to board at Naval Academy President Bush has announced his intention to appoint four new members to the Naval Academy Board of Visitors. The appointees are: Michael S. Steele of Maryland, for the remainder of a three-year term ending Dec. 30, 2003; Tirso Del Junco of California, for the remainder of a three-year term ending Dec. 30, 2002; Frederick Meyer of Texas, for the remainder of a three-year term ending Dec. 30, 2003; and Jane E. Newman of New Hampshire, for the remainder of a three-year term, ending Dec. 30, 2003.
NEWS
March 3, 2002
Professor David Carrasco of Harvard University will present the 2002 Honors Program Lecture at 8 p.m. Tuesday in McDaniel Lounge at Western Maryland College. The lecture, "Education for Liberation: God, Cornel West and Latinos at Harvard University," is free. Carrasco, a 1967 graduate of Western Maryland College, will discuss the educational vision of African-American philosopher of religion Cornel West, also a Harvard professor. He also will address the recent confrontation between West and Harvard President Lawrence H. Summers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By M. Dion Thompson and By M. Dion Thompson,Sun Staff | November 12, 2000
"The African-American Century: How Black Americans Have Shaped Our Country," by Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Cornel West. The Free Press. 414 pages. $30. This is a great book for the coffee table. It's the kind of volume you flip through while your host goes off to the kitchen to make cappucino, or perhaps pour an aperitif. Rather than produce a narrative tome, Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Cornel West have written 100 snapshots. Taken individually, these short pieces offer just enough to tantalize the curious mind.
FEATURES
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | February 17, 1994
As a former New Left student leader of the 1960s, Michael Lerner remembers when blacks and Jews often fought for the same causes. Now they often seem to be fighting each other.The recent furor over Louis Farrakhan's Nation of Islam, its hate-filled attacks on Jews and black leaders' sometimes ambivalent response to those attacks is only the latest symptom of a gradual deterioration in the black-Jewish relationship.How to reconnect African-Americans and Jewish Americans? Mr. Lerner, who is writing a book on the question with black philosopher Cornel West, comes to the University of Maryland Baltimore County tonight to offer suggestions.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | January 9, 2002
Tavis Smiley has launched his new program on National Public Radio in style. Smiley's debut show Monday featured a lengthy interview with Cornel West, the distinguished Harvard University professor who is in a public tangle with the university's new president. After Harvard President Lawrence Summers' pointed inquiries about West's political activities, West and several of his colleagues issued a statement saying they would consider leaving the Cambridge, Mass., campus. But Smiley was the first to interview West, and his remarks were excerpted on NPR's main newscasts and quoted widely elsewhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
By M. Dion Thompson and By M. Dion Thompson,Sun Staff | November 12, 2000
"The African-American Century: How Black Americans Have Shaped Our Country," by Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Cornel West. The Free Press. 414 pages. $30. This is a great book for the coffee table. It's the kind of volume you flip through while your host goes off to the kitchen to make cappucino, or perhaps pour an aperitif. Rather than produce a narrative tome, Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Cornel West have written 100 snapshots. Taken individually, these short pieces offer just enough to tantalize the curious mind.
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