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NEWS
By Linda Marsa and Linda Marsa,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 29, 2006
The cornea of the eye seems so simple a structure - yet it's so important and so tricky to re-create in a lab. It is the eye's protective window, keeping out dirt, debris and germs. It's a lens that helps focus light so that we can see. But when a cornea becomes cloudy or scarred from disease, injury or infection, the path of light into the eye can be distorted or blocked, resulting in blindness. Transplanting human corneas from cadavers can restore someone's vision. But because of a tissue shortage, only 100,000 corneal transplants are performed worldwide annually - serving just 1 percent of the 10 million people who are stricken with corneal blindness.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | December 6, 2012
Anderson Cooper recently shared a picture of himself on Instagram with a patch over one of his eyes after he was blinded while on assignment off the coast of Portugal. The CNN host said UV light bounced off the water and burned his eye, resulting in 36 hours of blindness in one eye. "I wake up in the middle of the night and it feels like my eyes are on fire," People Magazine reported he said. Janet Sunness, a retina and low vision specialist at Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Towson, said it is likely the ultraviolet light burned Cooper's cornea.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | December 6, 2012
Anderson Cooper recently shared a picture of himself on Instagram with a patch over one of his eyes after he was blinded while on assignment off the coast of Portugal. The CNN host said UV light bounced off the water and burned his eye, resulting in 36 hours of blindness in one eye. "I wake up in the middle of the night and it feels like my eyes are on fire," People Magazine reported he said. Janet Sunness, a retina and low vision specialist at Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Towson, said it is likely the ultraviolet light burned Cooper's cornea.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2011
Blepharitis, usually identified by a sufferer's red, irritated eyelids, is becoming more common. And while doctors aren't sure why, it can be controlled with vigilance, according to Dr. Laura K. Green, residency program director of cornea, cataract and refractive surgery at the Krieger Eye Institute at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore. She said there are some simple things sufferers can do at home, such as keeping the eyelids clean, that can help ease the irritation. What is blepharitis and what causes it?
NEWS
June 23, 1995
Yves Congar, 91, a theologian punished by the Vatican in the 1950s for his reformist views but rewarded last year by being named a cardinal, died Thursday in Paris after a long neurological illness. He entered the Dominican order in 1925, became a priest in 1930 and developed into one of the pioneering Roman Catholic theologians of the century.As early as 1937, he was espousing ecumenical themes that would not win broad acceptance among the Catholic hierarchy for another 25 years. His writings in the early 1950s -- suggesting that other churches also could claim to represent the theological truth -- incurred the wrath of some church traditionalists.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2000
At first, they couldn't tell what it was. The pink blob that appeared on the television screen was too fuzzy to discern. A touch of focus, and voila: "That's Mr. Mahon's eye!" About a dozen students from the McDonogh School got a look at laser eye surgery yesterday when they witnessed their science teacher, Robert J. Mahon Jr., undergo treatment for a serious case of nearsightedness. "I've been waiting 35 years for this," said Mahon, during a pre-operation meeting with Tina Bodine, a patient consultant, at the TLC Laser Eye Center in Towson.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan and Mary Beth Regan,Special to the Sun | December 10, 2004
When Cheryl Flood's husband had laser eye surgery to correct poor vision a few years ago, she was more than envious. "I was downright resentful," said the 40-year-old mother of two. "He qualified for the surgery, but I didn't. It seemed unfair." Like many people, Flood wasn't a good candidate for conventional LASIK or other laser procedures because of corneal irregularities. Still, she persevered in her quest for a glasses-free existence. She called her doctor, Sheri Rowen, every few months for nearly three years.
FEATURES
By Richard Saltus and Richard Saltus,Distributed by Universal Press Syndicate | January 1, 1991
In five years or so, the offices of eye doctors may well be crowded with people who have no interest in glasses or contact lenses. Instead, they'll be queuing up to have a laser beam etch a permanent vision correction into their eyes.With eyelids propped open and eyeballs anesthetized by numbing drops, they'll face the laser as it fires as many as 200 pulses of ultraviolent light with a rapid snapping sound. In a minute or less, it will have vaporized a thin layer of tissue from the cornea, the eye's transparent, lenslike covering, leaving it flattened by just the amount needed to refocus the patient's vision.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2011
Blepharitis, usually identified by a sufferer's red, irritated eyelids, is becoming more common. And while doctors aren't sure why, it can be controlled with vigilance, according to Dr. Laura K. Green, residency program director of cornea, cataract and refractive surgery at the Krieger Eye Institute at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore. She said there are some simple things sufferers can do at home, such as keeping the eyelids clean, that can help ease the irritation. What is blepharitis and what causes it?
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 11, 2001
Get out the cocktail wieners and settle back for a pleasant "read," because it's time for our fun feature, "Body Parts Making the News." Our first body part is featured in an Aug. 8 article from the Seattle Times, written by Ian Ith (yes, "Ian Ith") and sent in by alert medically trained reader Christine Robertson, M.D. The article states that a janitor at a Bellevue, Wash., apartment complex saw "crows pecking at something" in the parking lot; he shooed the crows away, and saw what they had been pecking on: a human thumb.
NEWS
By Linda Marsa and Linda Marsa,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 29, 2006
The cornea of the eye seems so simple a structure - yet it's so important and so tricky to re-create in a lab. It is the eye's protective window, keeping out dirt, debris and germs. It's a lens that helps focus light so that we can see. But when a cornea becomes cloudy or scarred from disease, injury or infection, the path of light into the eye can be distorted or blocked, resulting in blindness. Transplanting human corneas from cadavers can restore someone's vision. But because of a tissue shortage, only 100,000 corneal transplants are performed worldwide annually - serving just 1 percent of the 10 million people who are stricken with corneal blindness.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan and Mary Beth Regan,Special to the Sun | December 10, 2004
When Cheryl Flood's husband had laser eye surgery to correct poor vision a few years ago, she was more than envious. "I was downright resentful," said the 40-year-old mother of two. "He qualified for the surgery, but I didn't. It seemed unfair." Like many people, Flood wasn't a good candidate for conventional LASIK or other laser procedures because of corneal irregularities. Still, she persevered in her quest for a glasses-free existence. She called her doctor, Sheri Rowen, every few months for nearly three years.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2002
Chung-Ho Chen, a scientist and inventor who created a way to extend the viability of human corneas intended for transplants, died May 4 at University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center of injuries he suffered in an automobile accident. He was 64 and lived in Phoenix. His car was struck by another vehicle at Beaver Dam Road and Industry Lane in Baltimore County on April 25, according to a police report. In the 1990s, he formulated a nutrient-rich solution he named the Chen Medium for the preservation and storage of the human cornea -- the transparent tissue over the front of the eyeball.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 11, 2001
Get out the cocktail wieners and settle back for a pleasant "read," because it's time for our fun feature, "Body Parts Making the News." Our first body part is featured in an Aug. 8 article from the Seattle Times, written by Ian Ith (yes, "Ian Ith") and sent in by alert medically trained reader Christine Robertson, M.D. The article states that a janitor at a Bellevue, Wash., apartment complex saw "crows pecking at something" in the parking lot; he shooed the crows away, and saw what they had been pecking on: a human thumb.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2000
At first, they couldn't tell what it was. The pink blob that appeared on the television screen was too fuzzy to discern. A touch of focus, and voila: "That's Mr. Mahon's eye!" About a dozen students from the McDonogh School got a look at laser eye surgery yesterday when they witnessed their science teacher, Robert J. Mahon Jr., undergo treatment for a serious case of nearsightedness. "I've been waiting 35 years for this," said Mahon, during a pre-operation meeting with Tina Bodine, a patient consultant, at the TLC Laser Eye Center in Towson.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 4, 1996
During the hours before TWA Flight 800 left on its final journey, a courier from a local eye bank delivered a box to the TWA Express commuter-airline counter in Baltimore, marked to show that it held emergency medical supplies.A short time later, a TWA employee at Kennedy International Airport delivered the box to Flight 800. It was carefully stowed in the cockpit, and federal investigators say they do not believe the box was ever opened for inspection.While investigators say they have no evidence that there was anything wrong with the shipment, they say its very presence aboard the aircraft represents a gaping hole in airline security.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2002
Chung-Ho Chen, a scientist and inventor who created a way to extend the viability of human corneas intended for transplants, died May 4 at University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center of injuries he suffered in an automobile accident. He was 64 and lived in Phoenix. His car was struck by another vehicle at Beaver Dam Road and Industry Lane in Baltimore County on April 25, according to a police report. In the 1990s, he formulated a nutrient-rich solution he named the Chen Medium for the preservation and storage of the human cornea -- the transparent tissue over the front of the eyeball.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 4, 1996
During the hours before TWA Flight 800 left on its final journey, a courier from a local eye bank delivered a box to the TWA Express commuter-airline counter in Baltimore, marked to show that it held emergency medical supplies.A short time later, a TWA employee at Kennedy International Airport delivered the box to Flight 800. It was carefully stowed in the cockpit, and federal investigators say they do not believe the box was ever opened for inspection.While investigators say they have no evidence that there was anything wrong with the shipment, they say its very presence aboard the aircraft represents a gaping hole in airline security.
NEWS
June 23, 1995
Yves Congar, 91, a theologian punished by the Vatican in the 1950s for his reformist views but rewarded last year by being named a cardinal, died Thursday in Paris after a long neurological illness. He entered the Dominican order in 1925, became a priest in 1930 and developed into one of the pioneering Roman Catholic theologians of the century.As early as 1937, he was espousing ecumenical themes that would not win broad acceptance among the Catholic hierarchy for another 25 years. His writings in the early 1950s -- suggesting that other churches also could claim to represent the theological truth -- incurred the wrath of some church traditionalists.
FEATURES
By Richard Saltus and Richard Saltus,Distributed by Universal Press Syndicate | January 1, 1991
In five years or so, the offices of eye doctors may well be crowded with people who have no interest in glasses or contact lenses. Instead, they'll be queuing up to have a laser beam etch a permanent vision correction into their eyes.With eyelids propped open and eyeballs anesthetized by numbing drops, they'll face the laser as it fires as many as 200 pulses of ultraviolent light with a rapid snapping sound. In a minute or less, it will have vaporized a thin layer of tissue from the cornea, the eye's transparent, lenslike covering, leaving it flattened by just the amount needed to refocus the patient's vision.
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