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By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2011
Ken Jackson of Knoxville, Tenn., wrote seeking help in finding a recipe for making a vegan whole-grain cornbread. While I did not receive any responses from readers to his query, I was able to locate a good recipe for him on a food blog written by Morgan Anger called Little House of Veggies (littlehouseofveggies.blogspot.com). Anger, a vegan living in Southern California, says that she developed this recipe to accompany her vegan chili. I tested her recipe using sugar instead of evaporated cane juice.
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By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Lawrence Prather from St. Albans, W.Va., was seeking a recipe for a making a cornbread salad. Beatrice McElhinny from Dunbar, W. Va., sent in a recipe for a cornbread salad that she thought Prather might like to try. While a cornbread salad may sound a little odd, it is surprisingly good. This colorful, layered side dish would be terrific for a potluck or picnic and is a great way to use up left over cornbread. It would also make a nice addition to a tailgate or Super Bowl gathering.
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NEWS
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Lawrence Prather from St. Albans, W.Va., was seeking a recipe for a making a cornbread salad. Beatrice McElhinny from Dunbar, W. Va., sent in a recipe for a cornbread salad that she thought Prather might like to try. While a cornbread salad may sound a little odd, it is surprisingly good. This colorful, layered side dish would be terrific for a potluck or picnic and is a great way to use up left over cornbread. It would also make a nice addition to a tailgate or Super Bowl gathering.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2011
Ken Jackson of Knoxville, Tenn., wrote seeking help in finding a recipe for making a vegan whole-grain cornbread. While I did not receive any responses from readers to his query, I was able to locate a good recipe for him on a food blog written by Morgan Anger called Little House of Veggies (littlehouseofveggies.blogspot.com). Anger, a vegan living in Southern California, says that she developed this recipe to accompany her vegan chili. I tested her recipe using sugar instead of evaporated cane juice.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Carter and Sylvia Carter,NEWSDAY | May 22, 1996
"Shuck Beans, Stack Cakes and Honest Fried Chicken" by Ronni Lundy (Atlantic Monthly Press, $15) was published in 1991, but somehow I made its acquaintance only recently. The book, subtitled "The Heart and Soul of Southern Country Kitchens, Seasoned With Memories and Melodies From Country Music Stars," is, happily, still in print.Some of the most appealing recipes are the ones for cornbread, biscuits and other hot breads -- the kinds of things country cooks have always whipped up from a few ingredients to stretch meals when unexpected company drops by.Country people treasure stories and love to retell them.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | November 24, 2005
From what Freddi Spruille describes as the beginning of time, her mother has made the Thanksgiving cornbread dressing. She breaks up the unsweetened cornbread, smothers it with turkey juices and chicken broth, and adds sauteed vegetables, seasoning and chopped oysters. Then the whole dish is re-baked and, in its final, glorious form, is "more important than the turkey," Spruille said. Fortunately, wind, rain and floods can't obliterate traditions such as cornbread dressing. Holiday How Thanksgiving will help two other families cope with the loss of their homes in Hurricane Katrina.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | November 15, 2000
Item: Butterball One-Step Stuffing What you get: 4 one-half cup servings Cost: About $1.89 Nutritional content: Cornbread - 150 calories; 3 grams fat; 0.5 gram saturated fat; 590 milligrams sodium Preparation time: About 8 to 8 1/2 minutes in microwave, 10 minutes on stove top, 25 to 35 minutes in conventional oven Review: I had an ulterior motive when I bought this new stuffing mix from Butterball. I wondered if the one-step directions would decrease the Thanksgiving Day workload.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | January 4, 1994
The facts are finally out.Inquiring minds attached to expanding middles want to know. Is rotisserie chicken really a low-fat treat? Or at least lower fat than fried? The fact that folks are asking these questions is a good sign.We do keep hoping, though, that something that tastes this good could be good for us. We need the facts. And the facts have been slow in coming.Kentucky Fried Chicken and Roy Rogers have published data on all their products, including rotisserie chicken. Two newer companies, Kenny Rogers Roasters and Boston Chicken have not.So Tufts University Diet and Nutrition Letter did some testing on its own. Its researchers went to Boston and New York outlets of those last two, bought standard meals, and sent them off to a certified food laboratory to be analyzed for fat, calories and sodium.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | January 13, 1999
* Item: Healthy Choice Bowl Creations* What you get: 1 serving* Cost: About $2* Preparation time: Five to eight minutes microwave, 42 minutes in oven* Review: For those of us who worry about what we eat, these all-in-one meals are low in fat and calories. Unfortunately, some flavors are uneven. The Chili and Cornbread (made with beef and pork) brimmed with a variety of beans and had just enough bite to make it interesting. The Roasted Potatoes with Ham offered hearty flavor but was disappointing with pieces of gristle mixed in with the ham. The Turkey Divan had lots of broccoli, but the not-very-tender pressed chunks of meat weren't helped by gravy that tasted like brown paste.
FEATURES
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1995
As the bell clangs and the steel gate snaps open, Alberto Delgado feels the familiar surge of adrenalin and backward yank of inertia.The jockey's mount, a reddish-brown colt named Herman's Cornbread, instinctively bolts up and out of the starting gate, its hind legs uncoiling like giant springs. Mr. Delgado's right index finger, twirled in its mane, keeps him from being left behind as the half-ton animal accelerates to more than 30 mph.Mr. Delgado is crouched low over the saddle, peering around the horse's bobbing head.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | January 30, 2008
Baltimore magazine has just come out with a list of 20 "Top Singles." Among them: Del. Jill P. Carter, who is billed as a 40-year-old lawyer and legislator whose worst habit is "avoiding the inevitable." I'd say the habit's working for her. Carter has managed to avoid the passage of time - at least in the magazine. Carter's date of birth, according to the Baltimore City voter registration form she filed in 1982, is June 18, 1963. That makes her 44. Asked why the magazine was under the impression that she'd just hit the big 4-0, Carter said: "Well, it's what I said.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | November 24, 2005
From what Freddi Spruille describes as the beginning of time, her mother has made the Thanksgiving cornbread dressing. She breaks up the unsweetened cornbread, smothers it with turkey juices and chicken broth, and adds sauteed vegetables, seasoning and chopped oysters. Then the whole dish is re-baked and, in its final, glorious form, is "more important than the turkey," Spruille said. Fortunately, wind, rain and floods can't obliterate traditions such as cornbread dressing. Holiday How Thanksgiving will help two other families cope with the loss of their homes in Hurricane Katrina.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | May 12, 2002
I've never been to a restaurant that illustrates the axiom "If you have to ask how much it costs, you can't afford it" as well as Antrim 1844 does. The graceful antebellum mansion, now an inn and restaurant, is particularly beautiful this time of year. The late afternoon sun streams into the elegantly appointed rooms, and a breeze stirs the newly green trees just outside the tall windows. Of course, the setting isn't quite as rural as it used to be. The former plantation is now surrounded by housing developments, which are -- luckily --mostly hidden by the magnificent trees and other plantings on the grounds of the inn. The six-course dinner, served at 7 p.m., is a fixed price; it costs $62.50.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | November 15, 2000
Item: Butterball One-Step Stuffing What you get: 4 one-half cup servings Cost: About $1.89 Nutritional content: Cornbread - 150 calories; 3 grams fat; 0.5 gram saturated fat; 590 milligrams sodium Preparation time: About 8 to 8 1/2 minutes in microwave, 10 minutes on stove top, 25 to 35 minutes in conventional oven Review: I had an ulterior motive when I bought this new stuffing mix from Butterball. I wondered if the one-step directions would decrease the Thanksgiving Day workload.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | January 13, 1999
* Item: Healthy Choice Bowl Creations* What you get: 1 serving* Cost: About $2* Preparation time: Five to eight minutes microwave, 42 minutes in oven* Review: For those of us who worry about what we eat, these all-in-one meals are low in fat and calories. Unfortunately, some flavors are uneven. The Chili and Cornbread (made with beef and pork) brimmed with a variety of beans and had just enough bite to make it interesting. The Roasted Potatoes with Ham offered hearty flavor but was disappointing with pieces of gristle mixed in with the ham. The Turkey Divan had lots of broccoli, but the not-very-tender pressed chunks of meat weren't helped by gravy that tasted like brown paste.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Carter and Sylvia Carter,NEWSDAY | May 22, 1996
"Shuck Beans, Stack Cakes and Honest Fried Chicken" by Ronni Lundy (Atlantic Monthly Press, $15) was published in 1991, but somehow I made its acquaintance only recently. The book, subtitled "The Heart and Soul of Southern Country Kitchens, Seasoned With Memories and Melodies From Country Music Stars," is, happily, still in print.Some of the most appealing recipes are the ones for cornbread, biscuits and other hot breads -- the kinds of things country cooks have always whipped up from a few ingredients to stretch meals when unexpected company drops by.Country people treasure stories and love to retell them.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | January 30, 2008
Baltimore magazine has just come out with a list of 20 "Top Singles." Among them: Del. Jill P. Carter, who is billed as a 40-year-old lawyer and legislator whose worst habit is "avoiding the inevitable." I'd say the habit's working for her. Carter has managed to avoid the passage of time - at least in the magazine. Carter's date of birth, according to the Baltimore City voter registration form she filed in 1982, is June 18, 1963. That makes her 44. Asked why the magazine was under the impression that she'd just hit the big 4-0, Carter said: "Well, it's what I said.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | January 10, 1993
Fried chicken. Corn bread. Pork barbecue. Cheese grits. Hush puppies. Sweet potato souffle. Black-eyed peas. Smoked catfish. Mint juleps. Peach cobbler. Magnolia blossoms. White-washed barn wood. Old family silver . . .No question at all what region of the country we're talking about: It's the place where greens come out of the garden and pigs are at home in the barnyard. Where temperatures are hot and the blues are cool. Where passions run deep and voices run slow. Where manors are still maintained and manners still matter.
FEATURES
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1995
As the bell clangs and the steel gate snaps open, Alberto Delgado feels the familiar surge of adrenalin and backward yank of inertia.The jockey's mount, a reddish-brown colt named Herman's Cornbread, instinctively bolts up and out of the starting gate, its hind legs uncoiling like giant springs. Mr. Delgado's right index finger, twirled in its mane, keeps him from being left behind as the half-ton animal accelerates to more than 30 mph.Mr. Delgado is crouched low over the saddle, peering around the horse's bobbing head.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | January 4, 1994
The facts are finally out.Inquiring minds attached to expanding middles want to know. Is rotisserie chicken really a low-fat treat? Or at least lower fat than fried? The fact that folks are asking these questions is a good sign.We do keep hoping, though, that something that tastes this good could be good for us. We need the facts. And the facts have been slow in coming.Kentucky Fried Chicken and Roy Rogers have published data on all their products, including rotisserie chicken. Two newer companies, Kenny Rogers Roasters and Boston Chicken have not.So Tufts University Diet and Nutrition Letter did some testing on its own. Its researchers went to Boston and New York outlets of those last two, bought standard meals, and sent them off to a certified food laboratory to be analyzed for fat, calories and sodium.
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