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NEWS
December 14, 2012
While the Sugar Association applauds efforts to combat childhood obesity, delivering 10 tons of sugar (or white sand as the case may be) to illustrate what people are putting in their bodies when they drink a soda unfortunately misses the mark, as does The Sun's headline: "Howard bans sales of sugary drinks on county property" (Dec. 12). Sugar is sucrose - the all-natural sweetener you keep on your kitchen counter, not the sweetener in most beverages. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, more than 90 percent of all caloric sweetener used in beverages in the United States is high fructose corn syrup (HFCS)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
Paula Pumphrey from Glen Burnie was hoping someone would have the recipe for the fudge that was made and sold for a fundraiser for Public School 84 and the Salem Lutheran Church around the corner when she was growing up in South Baltimore. She said her mother, who is 90, also attended P.S. 84 and remembers the fudge fondly. She said the fudge was about a half-inch thick and snapped when you bit into it. It immediately melted in your mouth. Marilyn Vogel from Baltimore had the recipe Pumphrey was searching for. She said she was the secretary at P.S. 84, also known as the Thomas Johnson School, for 30 years and was a member of the school's "Mother's Club," which made the fudge.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2011
Around 1,000 gallons of corn syrup escaped from a South Baltimore storage tank Friday night, and 300 gallons of the sticky substance wound up in the Inner Harbor before a leaking valve was plugged, fire officials say. The leak occurred at Westway Feed Products in Locust Point, said fire operation aide Kris Floyd. Fire officials originally reported the location as the nearby Domino Sugar factory. By 10:30 p.m. Friday, firefighters had set up blockades on Hull Street to keep the syrup from reaching storm drains, Cartwright said Friday night.
NEWS
December 14, 2012
While the Sugar Association applauds efforts to combat childhood obesity, delivering 10 tons of sugar (or white sand as the case may be) to illustrate what people are putting in their bodies when they drink a soda unfortunately misses the mark, as does The Sun's headline: "Howard bans sales of sugary drinks on county property" (Dec. 12). Sugar is sucrose - the all-natural sweetener you keep on your kitchen counter, not the sweetener in most beverages. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, more than 90 percent of all caloric sweetener used in beverages in the United States is high fructose corn syrup (HFCS)
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | June 19, 2005
I started taking turmeric to help my psoriasis. Then I developed a severe rash and stopped the turmeric. My biggest concern is that I take Coumadin. When I went in for a routine blood test, my doctor told me that my blood was extremely thin. I was told to come in immediately for a vitamin-K shot to reverse this effect. Thanks for alerting us to a potentially life-threatening interaction between Coumadin (warfarin) and turmeric. Another reader reported liver-enzyme elevation with this spice.
FEATURES
December 13, 1998
Before measuring syrupy sweeteners such as honey and corn syrup, lightly coat the measuring cup or spoon with vegetable oil. Every drop of the syrup will easily slip out. The same result can be obtained if you measure the fat called for in a recipe and then use the same (unwashed) utensil as the measure for the sweetener.- The Food Lover's TiptionaryPub Date: 12/13/98@
FEATURES
By Minnie Bernardino and Minnie Bernardino,Los Angeles Times | December 6, 1992
A few hazelnuts go a long way. We roast the nuts to heighten their flavor and aroma.Hazelnut coffee cakeMakes 12 servings.1/2 cup hazelnuts1 1/2 cups flour1 teaspoon baking powder1 teaspoon baking soda1/2 cup sugar1/2 teaspoon salt1 egg yolk1/3 cup light corn syrup1 (6-ounce) carton light peach yogurt1 teaspoon vanilla3 egg whitescrumb topping (see below)additional peach yogurt, optionalSet hazelnuts on baking sheet and roast at 350 degrees 5 to 10 minutes. Remove from oven, place nuts in kitchen towel and rub back and forth to remove skins.
FEATURES
April 24, 1991
Fresh Fruit Shortcake is a fat-free white cake. For an everyday treat, sprinkle the cake with confectioners' sugar.Fat-free ShortcakeNon-stick vegetable cooking spray1 cup flour2/3 cup sugar1/3 cup cornstarch2 teaspoons baking powder1/2 teaspoon salt2 egg whites2/3 cup skim milk1/3 cup light corn syrup1 teaspoon vanilla1 pint strawberries, hulled and sliced3 medium oranges, peeled and sectionedConfectioners' sugarApricot-Orange SauceSpray a nine-inch square...
FEATURES
November 25, 1992
Pumpkin may have been the Pilgrims' pride, but in many homes today, it just isn't Thanksgiving without pecan pie.The basic recipe -- eggs, corn syrup, sugar, vanilla and lots of pecans -- is ripe for experiment.Chocolate and bourbon come to mind as successful additions. Simply sprinkle in a few chocolate chunks along with the pecans; or, soak the nuts in bourbon for a day or so before making the pie.Golden ambrosia pecan pie combines elements of a Southern staple, ambrosia salad, with pecan pie.Classic pecan pie3 eggs3 heaping tablespoons sugar1 tablespoon flour1 cup white corn syrup1 cup pecans1 teaspoon vanillaunbaked pastry for a 9-inch pieHeat oven to 350 degrees.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2011
Pat Braun from Mount Pleasant, Wis., said she was at an Amish settlement a few years back and had a soft peanut brittle. She said it tasted just like peanut brittle but was not as hard. She said she has tried several times to duplicate it with no success. Ardice Holbrook of Manchester sent in a recipe she came across on the Internet from CDKitchen (www.cdkitchen.com) that she thought Braun might want to try. I tested the recipe and found it was fairly easy to make, provided you have a working candy thermometer and don't mind a bit of a mess in your kitchen.
NEWS
August 23, 2012
Eighteen billion dollars. That is how much money American taxpayers have paid since 1995 to subsidize the production of four junk food ingredients: high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, corn starch, and soy oil. Instead of using our tax money to produce healthy fruits and vegetables, the dollars major agribusinesses receive from the federal government too often ends up as empty calories. This is government waste at its finest. It's even more ridiculous given that rates of childhood obesity have tripled in the past three decades.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | December 8, 2011
Despite the best efforts of the Calorie and Cholesterol Cops (CCC) to shame us, there are still those of us who really love to give gifts of goodies made by our own hands in our own kitchens. In order to be dietarily correct, however, I suppose we now have to carry on this annual culinary tradition (well, semi-annual, if you count our summertime zucchini bread orgy) with an eye to those on our gift list. Over-indulgers are definitely out. We probably should only give our homemade love to those who have managed to retain a grip on the old saw, "Moderation in all things.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2011
Around 1,000 gallons of corn syrup escaped from a South Baltimore storage tank Friday night, and 300 gallons of the sticky substance wound up in the Inner Harbor before a leaking valve was plugged, fire officials say. The leak occurred at Westway Feed Products in Locust Point, said fire operation aide Kris Floyd. Fire officials originally reported the location as the nearby Domino Sugar factory. By 10:30 p.m. Friday, firefighters had set up blockades on Hull Street to keep the syrup from reaching storm drains, Cartwright said Friday night.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2011
Pat Braun from Mount Pleasant, Wis., said she was at an Amish settlement a few years back and had a soft peanut brittle. She said it tasted just like peanut brittle but was not as hard. She said she has tried several times to duplicate it with no success. Ardice Holbrook of Manchester sent in a recipe she came across on the Internet from CDKitchen (www.cdkitchen.com) that she thought Braun might want to try. I tested the recipe and found it was fairly easy to make, provided you have a working candy thermometer and don't mind a bit of a mess in your kitchen.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
Larney Birkenbach from Parkville was looking for a recipe for making chocolate toffee apples. He said that back in the 1950s there was a street vendor in downtown Baltimore who made them and sold them on sticks. Nowadays, these goodies are available this time of year in many grocery stores and farmers' markets, but they can be a bit expensive, and it's easy to make them at home. Dorothy Griffith from Sparks sent in a recipe she clipped some years ago from the Recipe Finder column.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | March 17, 2010
Sarah Higgins stocks up on kosher-for- Passover Coke this time of year, and even though she's not Jewish, her shopping habits are a matter of faith. She believes in sugar. And the high-fructose corn syrup that sweetens regular soda? "It is the devil," said Higgins, 30, of Owings Mills. "It's in everything. If you were to go to your fridge right now, it has corn syrup in everything. It's in A-1. It's in salad dressing. I spend so much time in the supermarket - flip it over, if it has high-fructose corn syrup in it, it's not going in the basket."
NEWS
August 23, 2012
Eighteen billion dollars. That is how much money American taxpayers have paid since 1995 to subsidize the production of four junk food ingredients: high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, corn starch, and soy oil. Instead of using our tax money to produce healthy fruits and vegetables, the dollars major agribusinesses receive from the federal government too often ends up as empty calories. This is government waste at its finest. It's even more ridiculous given that rates of childhood obesity have tripled in the past three decades.
FEATURES
By Patricia Jamieson and Patricia Jamieson,United Feature Syndicate | August 4, 1993
The homespun goodness of freshly baked cinnamon rolls does not have to be lost when you eliminate the fat. We started out with an original recipe in which the sweet yeast dough was enriched with butter (or margarine) and eggs. We replaced a portion of the butter with pressed non-fat cottage cheese and added a small amount of vegetable oil to ensure tenderness. We also eliminated one egg yolk and used skim milk instead of whole to make a leaner dough.But it is the rich, sticky sweetness oozing from the cinnamon rolls that makes them truly memorable.
NEWS
February 9, 2009
Cheers! Study sees more wine benefits You've heard about the health benefits of red wine, which is rich in antioxidants. Now there is even more good news for moderate drinkers: A recent study by researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles found that healthy people age 50 and older who drink small-to-moderate amounts of alcohol appear less likely to suffer from age-related physical disabilities than people who don't drink. The report, published in the most recent issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology, defines light-to-moderate drinking as less than 15 drinks per week with a daily maximum of five drinks for men and four for women.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | August 20, 2008
ARTHUR SCHWARTZ'S NEW YORK CITY FOOD An Opinionated History and More Than 100 Legendary Recipes By Arthur Schwartz Stewart, Tabori & Chang / 2008 / $27.50 Defining New York cuisine is as difficult as listing which are our most American dishes, for New York reflects the country's breadth, and its food is truly a sum of its parts, cooked by the immigrant cultures, new and old, that continue to make this teeming city great. Veteran food writer and New York native Arthur Schwartz fittingly details a culinary history from the Native Americans and Dutch straight through to final chapters on soul food, contemporary classics and the fare favored by the Russians, Koreans, West Indians, Greeks, South Asians, Poles and Mexicans who have flocked to the city in more recent decades.
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