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NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2010
Jackie Cassel from Baltimore was seeking a recipe she had misplaced for a very simple corn pudding that she said appeared in a Dundalk community magazine about 10 years ago. Alberta McLaughlin , also from Baltimore, sent in a recipe from the Dundalk Centennial Cookbook 1895-1995 that was submitted by Ella Mae Helmick . She said that there were several corn pudding recipes in the book but that this seemed to be the simplest. And simple it is. In fact, it took longer for my oven to preheat then it did for me to put this casserole together.
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NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2010
Jackie Cassel from Baltimore was seeking a recipe she had misplaced for a very simple corn pudding that she said appeared in a Dundalk community magazine about 10 years ago. Alberta McLaughlin , also from Baltimore, sent in a recipe from the Dundalk Centennial Cookbook 1895-1995 that was submitted by Ella Mae Helmick . She said that there were several corn pudding recipes in the book but that this seemed to be the simplest. And simple it is. In fact, it took longer for my oven to preheat then it did for me to put this casserole together.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | August 28, 2008
Have you been following Slow Food Baltimore's Eat in Season Challenge? If it ended up producing nothing except this crazily cream and corntastic dish from Donna's chef Andy Thomas and sous-chef Brian Price, it would have been worth it. Thomas used local cream, too, in this silky smooth dish, and the basil was just the rough edge it needed. Donna's whole Eat in Season menu was admirable (but succotash without corn - sacre bleu!), and they've promised to try to keep the corn pudding (or is it a flan?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | August 28, 2008
Have you been following Slow Food Baltimore's Eat in Season Challenge? If it ended up producing nothing except this crazily cream and corntastic dish from Donna's chef Andy Thomas and sous-chef Brian Price, it would have been worth it. Thomas used local cream, too, in this silky smooth dish, and the basil was just the rough edge it needed. Donna's whole Eat in Season menu was admirable (but succotash without corn - sacre bleu!), and they've promised to try to keep the corn pudding (or is it a flan?
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | September 23, 1992
Corn pudding is a regular treat for many families as evidenced by the number of responses to a recipe request by Julia Hall of Pasadena.Most recipes sent in were similar, easy-to-make mixtures for baking, which called for fresh or canned regular and cream-style corn with eggs, milk, sugar and flour.Letters with the responses offered interesting tidbits about corn pudding such as one from Janet Johansen of Glen Burnie who noted that three generations of her family have enjoyed corn pudding, learning how to make it by watching an older family member.
NEWS
By Barbara Sparks | November 21, 1990
Sea of parked carsObligatory turkeyWhole-house aromaOyster stuffingToddlers in patent leatherCranberry sauceAntiquated carving toolsMashed potato cloudsNon-denominational graceGlossy green beansRows of straight-back chairsHarvard beetsLinen tableclothsCorn puddingTinkling wine glassesCandied sweet potatoesFussy babiesCelery sticksRecipe swappingButtery hot rollsCousin loveMama's corn muffinsFootballSteaming coffeeUncle John's cigarLatticed apple piesWar storiesMulled...
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | August 25, 2002
This is the time of year when vegetables assume starring roles in my menus. In late summer seductive produce is only minutes away from my house. At local roadside stands as well as at our town's weekly farmers' market, and even in my big chain neighborhood supermarket, I am tempted by the season's crops. Heirloom tomatoes, native corn, home-grown summer squash, countless varieties of beans, and potatoes of varying hues are irresistible, and that's just a short list. Cucumbers, peppers -- both sweet and hot -- arugula and other salad greens, and fennel are also among the local offerings.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1997
Delicious and different Nanaimo bars were the request of Judy Henderson of Bend, Ore., who wrote that she believed the recipe came from Canada.She was right. Nanaimo is the name of a city on Vancouver Island, and the recipe originated there. Ann Dahne of Towson sent in a recipe that came from the Vancouver Sun and was written by Barbara McQuade.Joanne Wolverton of Prineville, Ore., sent in a similar recipe, and she noted that there is no known date for the original Nanaimo bar nor a name of who introduced it. Whoever did, she says, put Nanaimo on the map. Some accounts say the Ladies Auxiliary of the Harewood Neighborhood Volunteer Fire Department made the first presentation at a benefit dance.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1999
Thanksgiving raises some of life's deeper questions.How do you know the bird isn't overcooking? How much should the pie filling be stirred? White or dark meat? Baked or mashed?Don't be stressed. As a group of 5-year-olds is learning, those facing such daunting decisions today are quite lucky. It means they can probably read well enough to cook.Friendship Valley Elementary kindergarten classes in Westminster spent this week preparing a menu for a Thanksgiving feast and cooking. Yesterday, after reading " `Twas the Night Before Thanksgiving," they dressed as pilgrims and Indians and enjoyed their supper at 9 a.m. (They attend morning kindergarten)
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | July 1, 2006
As in summers past, this year we'll be across the Atlantic in Paris on July 4, but we are planning a dinner for friends, complete with an all-American menu. Our guests will include several American and French friends who live in Paris and are happy to celebrate U.S. Independence Day. The apartment we are renting has a tiny kitchen with an oven without a thermostat and minimal (think 4 square feet) counter space, so I will do the cooking in stages. I already know what I'm going to serve, though.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | October 11, 2006
One of Baltimore's best-known chefs, Nancy Longo, has finally come to Baltimore County. The space at Greenspring Station that housed the popular Harvey's restaurant, and then has gone through several incarnations in recent years - including City Crab and Mick & Tony's - is now Longo's. Longo said that over the years, she's had numerous customers of her Fells Point eatery, Pierpoint, ask her to come to the county. "And there were only two places there I've ever been interested in moving to - the Valley Inn [on Falls Road]
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | July 1, 2006
As in summers past, this year we'll be across the Atlantic in Paris on July 4, but we are planning a dinner for friends, complete with an all-American menu. Our guests will include several American and French friends who live in Paris and are happy to celebrate U.S. Independence Day. The apartment we are renting has a tiny kitchen with an oven without a thermostat and minimal (think 4 square feet) counter space, so I will do the cooking in stages. I already know what I'm going to serve, though.
NEWS
By Tracy Sahler and Tracy Sahler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 10, 2003
CRISFIELD - In an era when crabbers struggle to make a living from the Chesapeake Bay, when the crab meat in supermarkets may come from the Far East and whole crabs from down South, it was perhaps fitting that the winner of the Crab Cooking Contest here came from across Maryland's northern border. Marrita Blatchley, a retiree and active volunteer from Shrewsbury, Pa., applied her love of cooking and good food to Maryland blue crab and came up with a winner. Her Crab-and-Corn Pudding With Sweet Red-Pepper Cream was novel enough and tasty enough to earn her first place among main dishes and grand prize in the cook-off, which drew 18 cooks to the classroom stoves at Woodson Middle School in Crisfield during the Labor Day weekend.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | August 25, 2002
This is the time of year when vegetables assume starring roles in my menus. In late summer seductive produce is only minutes away from my house. At local roadside stands as well as at our town's weekly farmers' market, and even in my big chain neighborhood supermarket, I am tempted by the season's crops. Heirloom tomatoes, native corn, home-grown summer squash, countless varieties of beans, and potatoes of varying hues are irresistible, and that's just a short list. Cucumbers, peppers -- both sweet and hot -- arugula and other salad greens, and fennel are also among the local offerings.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | April 8, 2001
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick. SUNDAY / Family Gather the family for your own or store-bought roast turkey breast.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1999
Thanksgiving raises some of life's deeper questions.How do you know the bird isn't overcooking? How much should the pie filling be stirred? White or dark meat? Baked or mashed?Don't be stressed. As a group of 5-year-olds is learning, those facing such daunting decisions today are quite lucky. It means they can probably read well enough to cook.Friendship Valley Elementary kindergarten classes in Westminster spent this week preparing a menu for a Thanksgiving feast and cooking. Yesterday, after reading " `Twas the Night Before Thanksgiving," they dressed as pilgrims and Indians and enjoyed their supper at 9 a.m. (They attend morning kindergarten)
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | April 8, 2001
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick. SUNDAY / Family Gather the family for your own or store-bought roast turkey breast.
FEATURES
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | June 21, 1998
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick.Sunday/FamilyFor a thrill on the grill, fix Teriyaki Steak for the gang (see recipe)
FEATURES
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | June 21, 1998
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick.Sunday/FamilyFor a thrill on the grill, fix Teriyaki Steak for the gang (see recipe)
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1997
Delicious and different Nanaimo bars were the request of Judy Henderson of Bend, Ore., who wrote that she believed the recipe came from Canada.She was right. Nanaimo is the name of a city on Vancouver Island, and the recipe originated there. Ann Dahne of Towson sent in a recipe that came from the Vancouver Sun and was written by Barbara McQuade.Joanne Wolverton of Prineville, Ore., sent in a similar recipe, and she noted that there is no known date for the original Nanaimo bar nor a name of who introduced it. Whoever did, she says, put Nanaimo on the map. Some accounts say the Ladies Auxiliary of the Harewood Neighborhood Volunteer Fire Department made the first presentation at a benefit dance.
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