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NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,NEWSDAY | September 13, 2006
How many different kinds of oil do I need in my kitchen? You can get by with as few as two - a good extra-virgin olive oil and an inexpensive unflavored oil such as canola or corn. Oil essentially serves three roles in the kitchen. As a texture provider, it creates moistness in baked goods and lends sauces and soups a silky quality. When you saute or fry in oil, you are using it as a cooking medium. Aromatic oils - olive oil and unrefined nut oils among them - enhance flavor when drizzled raw over a finished dish or used in a salad dressing or mayonnaise.
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NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,NEWSDAY | September 13, 2006
How many different kinds of oil do I need in my kitchen? You can get by with as few as two - a good extra-virgin olive oil and an inexpensive unflavored oil such as canola or corn. Oil essentially serves three roles in the kitchen. As a texture provider, it creates moistness in baked goods and lends sauces and soups a silky quality. When you saute or fry in oil, you are using it as a cooking medium. Aromatic oils - olive oil and unrefined nut oils among them - enhance flavor when drizzled raw over a finished dish or used in a salad dressing or mayonnaise.
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NEWS
By Dru Sefton | July 16, 1998
IF YOU have an e-mail account, you may have chuckled over one of these ditties.Call them Web witticisms if you will because there's really no name for them. They're amusing little electronic tidbits that ricochet all over the Internet as recipients guffaw and e-mail them on to their pals.Where do they come from? Who knows? Where did the first "knock-knock" joke come from?So in case you've missed them, or if you're not yet part of the computer revolution, here are some especially wacky ones:If corn oil comes from corn, where does baby oil come from?
NEWS
By ELAINE GLUSAC and ELAINE GLUSAC,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | July 26, 2006
Upscale restaurants have gone the convenience food stores one better, by making their own nibbles for sophisticates. Ideal for cool summer entertaining around the pool, these homemade bites are simple but loaded with impact. Popcorn, for example, is the blank slate of snack foods, changing with the addition of everything from fresh chopped herbs to sriracha hot sauce and kosher salt. Nuts take a variety of spices well. And deviled eggs can go Asian with wasabi and soy in the yolks or Tex-Mex with chilies.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | May 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- After telling makers of spaghetti sauce, orange juice concentrate and cooking oil that their product labels are misleading, the Food and Drug Administration is now working its way up the grocery aisle -- toward snack foods, peanut butter and mayonnaise.FDA spokesmen said yesterday that it would be "logical" to assume that some manufacturers of the three products, along with margarine and salad dressing, soon will betold the agency believes consumers are being misled by claims that the products are "cholesterol-free."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dru Sefton and Dru Sefton,KANSAS CITY STAR | July 6, 1998
If you have an e-mail account, you may have chuckled over one of these ditties.Call them Web witticisms if you will, because there's really no name for them. They're amusing little electronic tidbits that ricochet all over the Internet as recipients guffaw and e-mail them on to their pals.Where do they come from? Who knows? Where did the first "knock-knock" joke come from?So in case you've missed them, or if you're not yet part of the computer revolution, here are some especially strange ones:You can't trust dogs to watch your food.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | April 29, 1994
For fans of movie-theater popcorn -- "the Godzilla of snack foods," according to a report released earlier this week -- there may be a kernel of hope. At least in Baltimore.Here, theater-goers have a good chance of sitting down with a tub of corn popped in vegetable oil, which in health terms, is better for you than that popped with the saturated-fat coconut oil cited in a study released Monday by the Center for Science in the Public Interest.The watchdog group reports that a 16-cup serving of unbuttered, coconut-oil-popped corn has 901 calories and 43 grams of cholesterol.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | February 18, 2004
Banish the winter blahs with the smell of an oat-and-almond quick bread wafting through your kitchen. This recipe, from the Almond Board, contains 253 calories, 1 gram of saturated fat, 29 grams of carbohydrate, 4 grams of fiber and no cholesterol per serving. To make, preheat oven to 400 degrees. Grease a 5-inch-by-9-inch glass loaf pan with corn oil. Combine 2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour, 1 cup oat bran, 1/2 cup All-Bran cereal, 1 1/2 teaspoons ground nutmeg, 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder, 1/2 teaspoon baking soda and 1/2 teaspoon salt in a bowl and set aside.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 17, 1991
Almost anyone can whip up a dish when he has the necessary ingredients. The challenge comes when most of the fixin's are missing.The other night, for instance, I made stir-fried Chinese broccoli with beef, without the broccoli, but with a pair of pliers.It happened in a time frame well-known around our house for its dramatic culinary events. That would be when Mom is out of town. In the midst of fulfilling my parental responsibilities I had forgotten one small item: Fixing supper. I arrived home from work and realized that my two kids were expecting me to feed them.
NEWS
By ELAINE GLUSAC and ELAINE GLUSAC,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | July 26, 2006
Upscale restaurants have gone the convenience food stores one better, by making their own nibbles for sophisticates. Ideal for cool summer entertaining around the pool, these homemade bites are simple but loaded with impact. Popcorn, for example, is the blank slate of snack foods, changing with the addition of everything from fresh chopped herbs to sriracha hot sauce and kosher salt. Nuts take a variety of spices well. And deviled eggs can go Asian with wasabi and soy in the yolks or Tex-Mex with chilies.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | February 18, 2004
Banish the winter blahs with the smell of an oat-and-almond quick bread wafting through your kitchen. This recipe, from the Almond Board, contains 253 calories, 1 gram of saturated fat, 29 grams of carbohydrate, 4 grams of fiber and no cholesterol per serving. To make, preheat oven to 400 degrees. Grease a 5-inch-by-9-inch glass loaf pan with corn oil. Combine 2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour, 1 cup oat bran, 1/2 cup All-Bran cereal, 1 1/2 teaspoons ground nutmeg, 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder, 1/2 teaspoon baking soda and 1/2 teaspoon salt in a bowl and set aside.
NEWS
By Dru Sefton | July 16, 1998
IF YOU have an e-mail account, you may have chuckled over one of these ditties.Call them Web witticisms if you will because there's really no name for them. They're amusing little electronic tidbits that ricochet all over the Internet as recipients guffaw and e-mail them on to their pals.Where do they come from? Who knows? Where did the first "knock-knock" joke come from?So in case you've missed them, or if you're not yet part of the computer revolution, here are some especially wacky ones:If corn oil comes from corn, where does baby oil come from?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dru Sefton and Dru Sefton,KANSAS CITY STAR | July 6, 1998
If you have an e-mail account, you may have chuckled over one of these ditties.Call them Web witticisms if you will, because there's really no name for them. They're amusing little electronic tidbits that ricochet all over the Internet as recipients guffaw and e-mail them on to their pals.Where do they come from? Who knows? Where did the first "knock-knock" joke come from?So in case you've missed them, or if you're not yet part of the computer revolution, here are some especially strange ones:You can't trust dogs to watch your food.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | April 29, 1994
For fans of movie-theater popcorn -- "the Godzilla of snack foods," according to a report released earlier this week -- there may be a kernel of hope. At least in Baltimore.Here, theater-goers have a good chance of sitting down with a tub of corn popped in vegetable oil, which in health terms, is better for you than that popped with the saturated-fat coconut oil cited in a study released Monday by the Center for Science in the Public Interest.The watchdog group reports that a 16-cup serving of unbuttered, coconut-oil-popped corn has 901 calories and 43 grams of cholesterol.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | November 3, 1993
It's golden or bronze, silky-textured, it tastes great and it's good for you -- or at least, better for you than some alternatives. Can you guess what it is? A hint: It's positively ancient in origin. Another hint: It's No. 2 in dollar sales in its category.If you guessed olive oil, you are most likely a savvy, health-conscious, taste-conscious consumer -- or someone who grew up in a household where olive oil is a tradition as old as the family."There's no question about it," says Arlene Wanderman, a dietitian who works with the International Olive Oil Council.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 17, 1991
Almost anyone can whip up a dish when he has the necessary ingredients. The challenge comes when most of the fixin's are missing.The other night, for instance, I made stir-fried Chinese broccoli with beef, without the broccoli, but with a pair of pliers.It happened in a time frame well-known around our house for its dramatic culinary events. That would be when Mom is out of town. In the midst of fulfilling my parental responsibilities I had forgotten one small item: Fixing supper. I arrived home from work and realized that my two kids were expecting me to feed them.
FEATURES
By GAIL FORMAN | September 29, 1991
A salad is only as good as its dressing. And a salad dressing is only as good as the oil used to make it.Conflicting studies about the health benefits of polyunsaturated vs. monosaturated oils and the variety of oils in the supermarkets make choosing one a game of roulette. Recent studies favor monosaturated oils such as olive oil but with the data still inconclusive, why not let taste -- and quality -- be your guide?Though the array of oils may be confusing at first, remembering that each oil has its own character, taste and suitable culinary function makes the choice easier.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | November 3, 1993
It's golden or bronze, silky-textured, it tastes great and it's good for you -- or at least, better for you than some alternatives. Can you guess what it is? A hint: It's positively ancient in origin. Another hint: It's No. 2 in dollar sales in its category.If you guessed olive oil, you are most likely a savvy, health-conscious, taste-conscious consumer -- or someone who grew up in a household where olive oil is a tradition as old as the family."There's no question about it," says Arlene Wanderman, a dietitian who works with the International Olive Oil Council.
FEATURES
By GAIL FORMAN | September 29, 1991
A salad is only as good as its dressing. And a salad dressing is only as good as the oil used to make it.Conflicting studies about the health benefits of polyunsaturated vs. monosaturated oils and the variety of oils in the supermarkets make choosing one a game of roulette. Recent studies favor monosaturated oils such as olive oil but with the data still inconclusive, why not let taste -- and quality -- be your guide?Though the array of oils may be confusing at first, remembering that each oil has its own character, taste and suitable culinary function makes the choice easier.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | May 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- After telling makers of spaghetti sauce, orange juice concentrate and cooking oil that their product labels are misleading, the Food and Drug Administration is now working its way up the grocery aisle -- toward snack foods, peanut butter and mayonnaise.FDA spokesmen said yesterday that it would be "logical" to assume that some manufacturers of the three products, along with margarine and salad dressing, soon will betold the agency believes consumers are being misled by claims that the products are "cholesterol-free."
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