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NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 2, 2005
The long, cold nights of winter are made for comforting soups like my mother's corn chowder. She had clipped the recipe out of a woman's magazine some 40 years ago. The recipe epitomizes the convenience-driven attitude of the era: Nearly everything comes out of a can. Yet the chowder tastes home-cooked and makes a wonderfully affordable one-dish meal. While this recipe calls for hot dogs, you can gussy up the chowder by using a commercially available gourmet sausage, either chicken, turkey or duck.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
Sweet corn is at its seasonal peak, and its abundance is a great (and inexpensive) reason to get cooking. Sweet corn has a place in every cookout this time of year, whether in a salad, a side dish or, more likely, on the cob with butter and salt and pepper (or better yet, Old Bay). Jesse Albright, general manager at Albright farms in Monkton, sells sweet corn at the Fells Point Farmers' Market for $6 a dozen and offers preservation techniques for those of us who like to have a little bit of summer during the winter months.
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NEWS
By Bev Bennett and By Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | July 21, 2002
Shopping my neighborhood farmers' market is as much a part of my Saturday mornings as sipping a large latte. Taking an early morning stroll through the displays of fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs puts me in a food frame of mind for the rest of the day. And that's beneficial because I often stock up on produce before I know what I'm cooking during the week. As I stop for my morning coffee, I can decide what to do with my bounty. I know that herbs will go on everything from the breakfast eggs to a homemade dessert sorbet.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2011
Arnetta Paulin from Schuylkill Haven, Pa., was looking for a recipe for what she called rivel soup. She said her mother made this soup often when she was growing up in Pennsylvania Dutch country near Hershey. This simple but hearty soup, also sometimes called dough ball soup, was and still is a popular Amish comfort food. The recipe sent in by Bette Considine from Timonium comes from a Pennsylvania Dutch cookbook published in 1966. The word "rivel" means "lump," and this soup is full of lumps that look like rice when cooked.
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | August 23, 1992
In her book, "The Story of Corn," author Betty Fussell tells readers just about anything they might need to know about corn -- except how to cook it -- or not cook it, as the case may be. The original manuscript of the book contained recipes, but they didn't make the final cut.Sprinkled throughout, though, are vital bits of information about cooking with corn. For example, Ms. Fussell tells readers that from the moment it is plucked from the spiky stalk, corn's natural sugar begins converting to starch.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | April 14, 1993
A barbecue, an impossible pie and a corn souffle are spicy, sweet offerings from the oven.Hannah Miller of Salisbury asked for a recipe for "an oven-baked brisket barbecue," and Jessica Lawrence of Baltimore responded with the recipe.Lawrence's oven-baked brisket barbecueServes 8 to 10.1 beef brisket, 7 to 9 pounds1 teaspoon minced garlic1 teaspoon celery seeds3 tablespoons ground black pepper1 teaspoon ground ginger4 bay leaves crumbled1 12-ounce can tomato paste1 cup dark soy sauce1/2 cup Worcestershire sauce1 cup dark brown sugar2 medium onions, thinly sliced1 to 3 tablespoons beer or wine (optional)
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | August 25, 2002
This is the time of year when vegetables assume starring roles in my menus. In late summer seductive produce is only minutes away from my house. At local roadside stands as well as at our town's weekly farmers' market, and even in my big chain neighborhood supermarket, I am tempted by the season's crops. Heirloom tomatoes, native corn, home-grown summer squash, countless varieties of beans, and potatoes of varying hues are irresistible, and that's just a short list. Cucumbers, peppers -- both sweet and hot -- arugula and other salad greens, and fennel are also among the local offerings.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 3, 2005
Jessie Thomas of Ellicott City was looking for a recipe for corn fritters made with canned or frozen corn. Rita Gifford from Timonium sent in a recipe that her mother gave her back in the '50s, when she got married. She remembers her mother's making them throughout her childhood. These fritters are surprisingly light - almost like a corn pancake. They are not difficult to prepare if you don't mind the mess of frying in oil. This time of year, while the sweet corn is in season, I would make them using fresh corn and save the canned or frozen for winter.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | May 9, 2007
The Glory of Southern Cooking By James Villas Cypress By Craig Deihl Wyrick & Co. / 2007 / $34.95 There's a reason people pay big bucks to dine at great restaurants. Not only do they give us a respite from cooking, they offer a showcase for the best chefs to create works of edible art, using fantastic ingredients most diners don't have the time or wherewithal to obtain. For the same reason, cookbooks like Cypress, by the noted young chef of a Charleston, S.C., restaurant, can be hard to penetrate.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2011
Arnetta Paulin from Schuylkill Haven, Pa., was looking for a recipe for what she called rivel soup. She said her mother made this soup often when she was growing up in Pennsylvania Dutch country near Hershey. This simple but hearty soup, also sometimes called dough ball soup, was and still is a popular Amish comfort food. The recipe sent in by Bette Considine from Timonium comes from a Pennsylvania Dutch cookbook published in 1966. The word "rivel" means "lump," and this soup is full of lumps that look like rice when cooked.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | May 9, 2007
The Glory of Southern Cooking By James Villas Cypress By Craig Deihl Wyrick & Co. / 2007 / $34.95 There's a reason people pay big bucks to dine at great restaurants. Not only do they give us a respite from cooking, they offer a showcase for the best chefs to create works of edible art, using fantastic ingredients most diners don't have the time or wherewithal to obtain. For the same reason, cookbooks like Cypress, by the noted young chef of a Charleston, S.C., restaurant, can be hard to penetrate.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 9, 2006
A spur-of-the-moment dinner for friends is often far simpler and a lot more fun than one I've planned two weeks in advance. I feel less pressured to have the house cleaned to the nines, thus avoiding the usual tiff with my spouse about his picking up piles of books and pairs of shoes strewn throughout our home. Last-minute menus require simplicity, so I base mine on what's in the fridge and on what I can quickly pick up at the store -- I don't even make a grocery list. Best of all, though, inviting someone to come and share a meal with you at the last moment seems to give host and guest alike a lift, adding a spark to an ordinary day. This was the experience I had last week.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 3, 2005
Jessie Thomas of Ellicott City was looking for a recipe for corn fritters made with canned or frozen corn. Rita Gifford from Timonium sent in a recipe that her mother gave her back in the '50s, when she got married. She remembers her mother's making them throughout her childhood. These fritters are surprisingly light - almost like a corn pancake. They are not difficult to prepare if you don't mind the mess of frying in oil. This time of year, while the sweet corn is in season, I would make them using fresh corn and save the canned or frozen for winter.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 2, 2005
The long, cold nights of winter are made for comforting soups like my mother's corn chowder. She had clipped the recipe out of a woman's magazine some 40 years ago. The recipe epitomizes the convenience-driven attitude of the era: Nearly everything comes out of a can. Yet the chowder tastes home-cooked and makes a wonderfully affordable one-dish meal. While this recipe calls for hot dogs, you can gussy up the chowder by using a commercially available gourmet sausage, either chicken, turkey or duck.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | March 2, 2003
Although my husband and I do not belong to a gourmet eating club, we do have a small circle of friends with whom we occasionally share potluck suppers. Our group follows no particular schedule. Instead, we assemble at random times of the year, when one of us proposes a date. Several days ago, I initiated a get-together to counter the midwinter blahs. I suggested that we collect at our house for a Friday night supper and, adding a new twist, that we watch a movie afterward. Our clan, made up of devoted movie fans, met this idea enthusiastically and chose the classic comedy Some Like It Hot as the evening's entertainment.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2002
TAKOMA PARK - The corn-burning stove that Mike Tidwell put in his living room last winter kept most of his 87-year-old, two-story bungalow toasty warm - so much, in fact, that his furnace never came on. But Tidwell and some other local residents who use the stoves realized they still had one big hurdle to overcome this winter: how to store enough corn in this Washington suburb. Their solution was a 25-foot-tall grain silo that holds nearly 21 tons of shelled field corn. Used mainly as animal feed, this type of corn has become more popular in recent years as a clean-burning, economical alternative to natural gas, oil and wood.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 9, 2006
A spur-of-the-moment dinner for friends is often far simpler and a lot more fun than one I've planned two weeks in advance. I feel less pressured to have the house cleaned to the nines, thus avoiding the usual tiff with my spouse about his picking up piles of books and pairs of shoes strewn throughout our home. Last-minute menus require simplicity, so I base mine on what's in the fridge and on what I can quickly pick up at the store -- I don't even make a grocery list. Best of all, though, inviting someone to come and share a meal with you at the last moment seems to give host and guest alike a lift, adding a spark to an ordinary day. This was the experience I had last week.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | March 2, 2003
Although my husband and I do not belong to a gourmet eating club, we do have a small circle of friends with whom we occasionally share potluck suppers. Our group follows no particular schedule. Instead, we assemble at random times of the year, when one of us proposes a date. Several days ago, I initiated a get-together to counter the midwinter blahs. I suggested that we collect at our house for a Friday night supper and, adding a new twist, that we watch a movie afterward. Our clan, made up of devoted movie fans, met this idea enthusiastically and chose the classic comedy Some Like It Hot as the evening's entertainment.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | August 25, 2002
This is the time of year when vegetables assume starring roles in my menus. In late summer seductive produce is only minutes away from my house. At local roadside stands as well as at our town's weekly farmers' market, and even in my big chain neighborhood supermarket, I am tempted by the season's crops. Heirloom tomatoes, native corn, home-grown summer squash, countless varieties of beans, and potatoes of varying hues are irresistible, and that's just a short list. Cucumbers, peppers -- both sweet and hot -- arugula and other salad greens, and fennel are also among the local offerings.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and By Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | July 21, 2002
Shopping my neighborhood farmers' market is as much a part of my Saturday mornings as sipping a large latte. Taking an early morning stroll through the displays of fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs puts me in a food frame of mind for the rest of the day. And that's beneficial because I often stock up on produce before I know what I'm cooking during the week. As I stop for my morning coffee, I can decide what to do with my bounty. I know that herbs will go on everything from the breakfast eggs to a homemade dessert sorbet.
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