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Corn Fritters

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May 14, 2012
Sharon Brazell from Severna Park was hoping someone would have the recipe for the hush puppies that were served at the Peter Pan Inn in Urbana. The restaurant, which closed in 1986, was famous for its plentiful family-style meals and beautiful setting. Brazell said her family, like many in the 1950s, '60s and '70s, would make the drive to the country restaurant near Frederick for special occasions to enjoy the food and setting, which included peacocks parading in the gardens.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2012
Sharon Brazell from Severna Park was hoping someone would have the recipe for the hush puppies that were served at the Peter Pan Inn in Urbana. The restaurant, which closed in 1986, was famous for its plentiful family-style meals and beautiful setting. Brazell said her family, like many in the 1950s, '60s and '70s, would make the drive to the country restaurant near Frederick for special occasions to enjoy the food and setting, which included peacocks parading in the gardens.
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FEATURES
By Jane Snow and Jane Snow,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 19, 1998
This summer is a beaut. The weather is warm and the corn has been coming in like gangbusters.The first corn of the season tastes like a miracle. The earthy, grassy aroma of a just-stripped ear reminds us that nature not only renews itself, it frolics.The only way to eat corn in the early going, of course, is lightly steamed, heavily buttered and sprinkled with salt. But we're deep into the corn season now, and you're probably ready for fresh corn fritters with grilled shrimp and dollops of chipotle-spiked chevre.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 3, 2005
Jessie Thomas of Ellicott City was looking for a recipe for corn fritters made with canned or frozen corn. Rita Gifford from Timonium sent in a recipe that her mother gave her back in the '50s, when she got married. She remembers her mother's making them throughout her childhood. These fritters are surprisingly light - almost like a corn pancake. They are not difficult to prepare if you don't mind the mess of frying in oil. This time of year, while the sweet corn is in season, I would make them using fresh corn and save the canned or frozen for winter.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1997
Have a happy, happy New Year, and be thankful for the two recipes in today's column.Aileen E. Bird of Pipestone, Minn., wants to make deep-fried fritters for her grandchildren. "I'm losing my eyesight, and I've about given up, but I would love this recipe, which my mother loved with sugar on top and served with green tea," she wrote.Roy Wood of Edgemere was looking for a recipe for corn oysters, which "are very similar to corn fritters."Mary Flutka of Ellicott City responded with a corn-fritters recipe that fits both bills and can be served with maple syrup or a sprinkle of confectioners' sugar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 20, 1991
Good old Peter Pan still hasn't grown up.Remember Peter Pan? For kids who grew up in the Baltimore, Washington and Frederick areas, Peter Pan-the-restaurant was nearly as memorable as Peter Pan-the-literary-classic. (The book, the Mary Martin version or the Disney cartoon, take your pick.) This was the definitive special occasion dinner place. The old country house with its scrolly New Orleans ironwork, fountains and statuary was delightfully wacky and decadent -- not a bit like our suburban homes.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 3, 2005
Jessie Thomas of Ellicott City was looking for a recipe for corn fritters made with canned or frozen corn. Rita Gifford from Timonium sent in a recipe that her mother gave her back in the '50s, when she got married. She remembers her mother's making them throughout her childhood. These fritters are surprisingly light - almost like a corn pancake. They are not difficult to prepare if you don't mind the mess of frying in oil. This time of year, while the sweet corn is in season, I would make them using fresh corn and save the canned or frozen for winter.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2003
You might worry about a restaurant like Vince's Carry Out that sells Alka-Seltzer out of a vending machine in the waiting area. But, I'm happy to report no stomach relief was needed after our recent meal at this Harford County carryout in Joppa. Indeed, we were satisfied, if not overwhelmed, by our outing to Vince's. With one sad-looking plant and absolutely no decoration on the walls, this small carryout isn't much to look at. But the service was both friendly and efficient, there was a bench for customers waiting for orders, and the food was reasonably priced.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 1, 1993
I sat through 73 bleeping minutes of "Children of the Corn 2: The Final Sacrifice" for one reason only: to see "He Who Walks Behind the Rows" because I just assumed that He Who Walks Behind the Rows would be Orville Redenbacher.But it wasn't, and I'm ticked. I want my 73 minutes back.Anyway, this one is a retread of an earlier corn dog of a movie, which evidently originated in a Stephen King short story, which in turn must have had its origins in a peculiar brand of rural horror tradition.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2004
E. Eugene Frock, a caterer and musician who operated Frock's Sunnybrook Farm for more than 30 years, died Tuesday of a ruptured aortic aneurysm at Carroll Hospital Center. The Westminster native was 74. Gene Frock, as he was known, took over the family business in 1964 and expanded what had started in the 1930s as a swimming hole into a full-scale banquet facility. Lenders were skeptical that he could fill the banquet room that could hold more than 600, Mr. Frock told The Sun in 1997 as he prepared to retire and sell the 20-acre property near Westminster's business district.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2004
E. Eugene Frock, a caterer and musician who operated Frock's Sunnybrook Farm for more than 30 years, died Tuesday of a ruptured aortic aneurysm at Carroll Hospital Center. The Westminster native was 74. Gene Frock, as he was known, took over the family business in 1964 and expanded what had started in the 1930s as a swimming hole into a full-scale banquet facility. Lenders were skeptical that he could fill the banquet room that could hold more than 600, Mr. Frock told The Sun in 1997 as he prepared to retire and sell the 20-acre property near Westminster's business district.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2003
You might worry about a restaurant like Vince's Carry Out that sells Alka-Seltzer out of a vending machine in the waiting area. But, I'm happy to report no stomach relief was needed after our recent meal at this Harford County carryout in Joppa. Indeed, we were satisfied, if not overwhelmed, by our outing to Vince's. With one sad-looking plant and absolutely no decoration on the walls, this small carryout isn't much to look at. But the service was both friendly and efficient, there was a bench for customers waiting for orders, and the food was reasonably priced.
FEATURES
By Jane Snow and Jane Snow,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 19, 1998
This summer is a beaut. The weather is warm and the corn has been coming in like gangbusters.The first corn of the season tastes like a miracle. The earthy, grassy aroma of a just-stripped ear reminds us that nature not only renews itself, it frolics.The only way to eat corn in the early going, of course, is lightly steamed, heavily buttered and sprinkled with salt. But we're deep into the corn season now, and you're probably ready for fresh corn fritters with grilled shrimp and dollops of chipotle-spiked chevre.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1997
Have a happy, happy New Year, and be thankful for the two recipes in today's column.Aileen E. Bird of Pipestone, Minn., wants to make deep-fried fritters for her grandchildren. "I'm losing my eyesight, and I've about given up, but I would love this recipe, which my mother loved with sugar on top and served with green tea," she wrote.Roy Wood of Edgemere was looking for a recipe for corn oysters, which "are very similar to corn fritters."Mary Flutka of Ellicott City responded with a corn-fritters recipe that fits both bills and can be served with maple syrup or a sprinkle of confectioners' sugar.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | November 7, 1996
THE LAST TIME a Kansas Republican ran for president, he got beat worse than Bob Dole did. But he got a terrific consolation prize. That was Gov. Alf Landon, who was invited to a life-enhancing Maryland dinner with various editors and executives of The Sunpapers at Baltimore's Southern Hotel in the aftermath of the 1936 election.Landon had lost in one of the biggest landslides of all time. President Franklin D. Roosevelt got 61 percent of the popular vote and 523 electoral votes, to Landon's 37 percent and 8electoral votes.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 1, 1993
I sat through 73 bleeping minutes of "Children of the Corn 2: The Final Sacrifice" for one reason only: to see "He Who Walks Behind the Rows" because I just assumed that He Who Walks Behind the Rows would be Orville Redenbacher.But it wasn't, and I'm ticked. I want my 73 minutes back.Anyway, this one is a retread of an earlier corn dog of a movie, which evidently originated in a Stephen King short story, which in turn must have had its origins in a peculiar brand of rural horror tradition.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | November 7, 1996
THE LAST TIME a Kansas Republican ran for president, he got beat worse than Bob Dole did. But he got a terrific consolation prize. That was Gov. Alf Landon, who was invited to a life-enhancing Maryland dinner with various editors and executives of The Sunpapers at Baltimore's Southern Hotel in the aftermath of the 1936 election.Landon had lost in one of the biggest landslides of all time. President Franklin D. Roosevelt got 61 percent of the popular vote and 523 electoral votes, to Landon's 37 percent and 8electoral votes.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,Restaurant Critic | March 13, 1993
Westminster Inn, 5 S. Center St., Westminster, (410 876-2893. This isn't the kind of country inn that serves fried chicken and corn fritters. The Westminster Inn specializes in contemporary American food: Blackened redfish with crab meat and creme fraiche. Tournedos and fried green tomatoes. Quail stuffed with wild rice and sun-dried cranberries. Sun-dried cranberries don't come cheap, but if price isn't a consideration, you can have a fine, even elegant, meal in one of the inn's two handsome dining rooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 20, 1991
Good old Peter Pan still hasn't grown up.Remember Peter Pan? For kids who grew up in the Baltimore, Washington and Frederick areas, Peter Pan-the-restaurant was nearly as memorable as Peter Pan-the-literary-classic. (The book, the Mary Martin version or the Disney cartoon, take your pick.) This was the definitive special occasion dinner place. The old country house with its scrolly New Orleans ironwork, fountains and statuary was delightfully wacky and decadent -- not a bit like our suburban homes.
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