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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1998
Mercedes Mott of Albuquerque, N.M., wrote to us awhile back: "Years ago, in the 1950s, I had an apple crisp made with corn flakes and it was the best I have ever had. Would anyone have such a recipe?"Mary Ellen Lippy of Lutherville shared her recipe, which she said was sent to her from the Kellogg Co. "They checked their files and sent it to me. Hope it helps," she said.Apple CrispMakes 9 servings3/4 cup Kellogg's Corn Flake Crumbs1/2 cup all-purpose flour1/2 teaspoon salt1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar1/3 cup chopped nuts1/2 cup margarine or butter, softened1 can (1 pound, 4 ounces)
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NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | March 8, 2006
The Kellogg Co. didn't begin with a snap, crackle or a pop. It began with an accident. According to corporate legend, in 1894 the Kellogg brothers, W.K. and John Harvey, were boiling a batch of wheatberries in their experimental kitchen when they were called away. By the time they returned, the wheatberries had turned stale, but the enterprising siblings forced the grain through the rollers anyway. Voila! The first flaked cereal. A few years later, W.K.'s experiments led to the development of flaked corn.
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SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler | May 19, 1991
Cereal manufacturers used to put all sorts of strange and wonderful (if you were a child) things in their boxes to entice people to buy their products -- baking-powder submarines, fanciful space creatures that rode on a spoon and rings.Kellogg's is doing it again with something that may have collectors of all ages shaking their Corn Flakes boxes for hidden treasure.For the first time since 1983, Kellogg's is putting out a baseball set. This year's is one of the smallest by the cereal maker, and it marks the only appearance this season of Sportflics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David W. Marston and By David W. Marston,Special to the Sun | December 31, 2000
"Hollywood v. Hardcore: How the Struggle Over Censorship Created the Modern Film Industry," by Jon Lewis. New York University Press. 359 pages. $26.95. Sex sells. Jon Lewis had to be thinking that when he decided that hardcore pornography should be the focus of his Hollywood history. But "Hollywood v. Hardcore" proves that ponderous writing and a fatally flawed premise can kill the sizzle. Writing about Tinseltown, where they routinely make drama out of cornflakes, Lewis manages to do the opposite.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1995
The 13-year-old appeared in the kitchen at 7:15 in the morning, holding his head and clutching his stomach. In mournful tones, he announced that he was too sick to go to school.L "Nice try," I said, and quickly went back to my corn flakes.The thing about corn flakes is, you have to get to them the instant the milk is poured in the bowl. Otherwise they quickly become soaked and you're left with a brown mush that tastes like Purina Puppy Chow.The point is, if I'm eating my corn flakes and the person next to me has anything less than a grand mal seizure, I won't even look up.Unless you're twitching on the floor and turning blue, don't bother me, pal.Anyway, I thought I'd made this policy clear, but apparently I didn't make it clear enough.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 17, 1997
BATTLE CREEK, Mich. -- Kellogg Co. was in a jam. Sales of its cereals were already slowing as consumers switched to alternatives such as bagels and granola bars. Then its rivals started slashing prices.That left the world's biggest cereal maker little choice but to follow suit, and hope the lower prices would lure back customers.It's not working. Kellogg's portion of the breakfast cereal market continues to shrink to historic lows.To make matters worse, gains by No. 2 General Mills Inc. threaten to topple Kellogg's dominance over the industry it invented a century ago.The price cuts have taken a toll on Kellogg's earnings, which have dropped three straight quarters and aren't expected to improve until after the first quarter.
NEWS
By Dave Edelman | July 19, 1993
THE ROAD TO WELLVILLE. By T. Coraghessan Boyle. Viking Penguin. 476 pages. $22.50. ANY doctor who prescribed five enemas a day, sexual abstinence and high doses of radium for an ulcer would be kicked out of town before sunset.Unless, of course, that doctor was Dr. John Harvey Kellogg and his town was Battle Creek, Mich., in 1907. There, Kellogg, the self-proclaimed health messiah and inventor of corn flakes and peanut butter, reigned supreme. For more than 20 years, Kellogg's sanitarium devoted to "scientific living" attracted the best and brightest of Americans looking for the magic cure.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | December 29, 1993
Over the past year, this column has received hundreds of friendly, chatty and informative notes bringing recipe requests and responses, from readers from all over the country.The most sought-after recipes have been the old favorites which have been enjoyed by a family for many years but were lost in a move or thrown out by mistake.And, those favorites are also the favorites of many who want to share and have not lost the recipe.Cakes and cookies seem to dominate, but close on their sugary platters come pies, custards and candies such as the Hershey almond pie published Feb. 3 and the egg custard June 9. The sugar queens of them all were the decadent chocolate cake published Jan. 27 and Tiramisu July 21. Both brought a flood of responses.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | March 8, 2006
The Kellogg Co. didn't begin with a snap, crackle or a pop. It began with an accident. According to corporate legend, in 1894 the Kellogg brothers, W.K. and John Harvey, were boiling a batch of wheatberries in their experimental kitchen when they were called away. By the time they returned, the wheatberries had turned stale, but the enterprising siblings forced the grain through the rollers anyway. Voila! The first flaked cereal. A few years later, W.K.'s experiments led to the development of flaked corn.
FEATURES
June 21, 1998
If an entire entertainment empire could be built around a mouse with a squeaky voice, why not one dedicated to breakfast cereal?Besides, just as the realm of Walt Disney's Mickey is more than a celebration of mousedom, Kellogg's Cereal City USA, which opened this month in downtown Battle Creek, Mich., promises to be more than a $22-million monument to snap, crackle and pop.It's been 100 years since W.K. Kellogg devised a way of making airy little flakes out of corn and revolutionized the American breakfast and life in Battle Creek.
FEATURES
June 21, 1998
If an entire entertainment empire could be built around a mouse with a squeaky voice, why not one dedicated to breakfast cereal?Besides, just as the realm of Walt Disney's Mickey is more than a celebration of mousedom, Kellogg's Cereal City USA, which opened this month in downtown Battle Creek, Mich., promises to be more than a $22-million monument to snap, crackle and pop.It's been 100 years since W.K. Kellogg devised a way of making airy little flakes out of corn and revolutionized the American breakfast and life in Battle Creek.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1998
Mercedes Mott of Albuquerque, N.M., wrote to us awhile back: "Years ago, in the 1950s, I had an apple crisp made with corn flakes and it was the best I have ever had. Would anyone have such a recipe?"Mary Ellen Lippy of Lutherville shared her recipe, which she said was sent to her from the Kellogg Co. "They checked their files and sent it to me. Hope it helps," she said.Apple CrispMakes 9 servings3/4 cup Kellogg's Corn Flake Crumbs1/2 cup all-purpose flour1/2 teaspoon salt1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar1/3 cup chopped nuts1/2 cup margarine or butter, softened1 can (1 pound, 4 ounces)
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 17, 1997
BATTLE CREEK, Mich. -- Kellogg Co. was in a jam. Sales of its cereals were already slowing as consumers switched to alternatives such as bagels and granola bars. Then its rivals started slashing prices.That left the world's biggest cereal maker little choice but to follow suit, and hope the lower prices would lure back customers.It's not working. Kellogg's portion of the breakfast cereal market continues to shrink to historic lows.To make matters worse, gains by No. 2 General Mills Inc. threaten to topple Kellogg's dominance over the industry it invented a century ago.The price cuts have taken a toll on Kellogg's earnings, which have dropped three straight quarters and aren't expected to improve until after the first quarter.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1995
The 13-year-old appeared in the kitchen at 7:15 in the morning, holding his head and clutching his stomach. In mournful tones, he announced that he was too sick to go to school.L "Nice try," I said, and quickly went back to my corn flakes.The thing about corn flakes is, you have to get to them the instant the milk is poured in the bowl. Otherwise they quickly become soaked and you're left with a brown mush that tastes like Purina Puppy Chow.The point is, if I'm eating my corn flakes and the person next to me has anything less than a grand mal seizure, I won't even look up.Unless you're twitching on the floor and turning blue, don't bother me, pal.Anyway, I thought I'd made this policy clear, but apparently I didn't make it clear enough.
BUSINESS
By Chicago Tribune | May 22, 1995
HODGE, La. -- At Plant 56, the sensory assault is unrelenting.Fueled by special potions like black liquor, white liquor and a host of other chemicals that pulverize wood into paper, the smells waft around the thundering machinery like little pockets of pungence -- first piercingly sweet, then acrid, then hot, then sulfureous. Powerful enough to taste, the odors are at once specifically distinct and generally obnoxious."My kids complain about it when they come down here," said Marion Burn, the general manager at Stone Container Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 28, 1994
One of the base canards of American film culture argues that the problem with the movies is that they're run by businessmen, not artists. If only the artists ran the movies, all that would be different.Not so, not even close. Here's "The Road to Wellville," by British auteur Alan Parker, in which Columbia Pictures invested approximately $30 million or so and let him go wherever his muse would take him. Where it has taken him is down the road to hell, which, like "The Road to Wellville," is paved with good intentions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 28, 1994
One of the base canards of American film culture argues that the problem with the movies is that they're run by businessmen, not artists. If only the artists ran the movies, all that would be different.Not so, not even close. Here's "The Road to Wellville," by British auteur Alan Parker, in which Columbia Pictures invested approximately $30 million or so and let him go wherever his muse would take him. Where it has taken him is down the road to hell, which, like "The Road to Wellville," is paved with good intentions.
BUSINESS
By Chicago Tribune | May 22, 1995
HODGE, La. -- At Plant 56, the sensory assault is unrelenting.Fueled by special potions like black liquor, white liquor and a host of other chemicals that pulverize wood into paper, the smells waft around the thundering machinery like little pockets of pungence -- first piercingly sweet, then acrid, then hot, then sulfureous. Powerful enough to taste, the odors are at once specifically distinct and generally obnoxious."My kids complain about it when they come down here," said Marion Burn, the general manager at Stone Container Corp.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | December 29, 1993
Over the past year, this column has received hundreds of friendly, chatty and informative notes bringing recipe requests and responses, from readers from all over the country.The most sought-after recipes have been the old favorites which have been enjoyed by a family for many years but were lost in a move or thrown out by mistake.And, those favorites are also the favorites of many who want to share and have not lost the recipe.Cakes and cookies seem to dominate, but close on their sugary platters come pies, custards and candies such as the Hershey almond pie published Feb. 3 and the egg custard June 9. The sugar queens of them all were the decadent chocolate cake published Jan. 27 and Tiramisu July 21. Both brought a flood of responses.
NEWS
By Dave Edelman | July 19, 1993
THE ROAD TO WELLVILLE. By T. Coraghessan Boyle. Viking Penguin. 476 pages. $22.50. ANY doctor who prescribed five enemas a day, sexual abstinence and high doses of radium for an ulcer would be kicked out of town before sunset.Unless, of course, that doctor was Dr. John Harvey Kellogg and his town was Battle Creek, Mich., in 1907. There, Kellogg, the self-proclaimed health messiah and inventor of corn flakes and peanut butter, reigned supreme. For more than 20 years, Kellogg's sanitarium devoted to "scientific living" attracted the best and brightest of Americans looking for the magic cure.
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