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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | December 14, 1995
Carole Jean Bertsch's photographs of women and children have been described in the magazine Voices of Women as "Haunting, sometimes absurd and theatrical, sometimes soulful and provocative." She often uses costumes and props with her figures, often hand-colors her photographs, and has used sites as varied as back yards, a corn crib, an abandoned gas station and tents at the Havre de Grace Fourth of July carnival. A show of her work from the last 15 years, called "Succumb to the Magic," is currently on view at the I. Brewster Gallery in Pikesville.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2011
The turbo-charged guy with a head full of swirling salt-and-pepper hair sitting at the lower end of Grand Cru busily sketching most Saturday afternoons, dressed in faded blue jeans, bumpy tweed sport coat, Irish country farmers vest, shirt and tie, is the loquacious Kevin O'Malley. The Belvedere Square bar is O'Malley's home away from home, living room or branch office-studio. He comes here to think, draw, laugh, pick up a few ideas while quaffing a few cold ones with his usual cadre of boon companions.
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NEWS
August 15, 2007
Eleanor F. "Ellie" Vernon-Williams, a retired librarian who restored an Eastern Shore home, died in her sleep Aug. 6 at the Caroline Home for Hospice in Denton. She was 83. Eleanor F. Dunham was born and raised in New Bedford, Mass., and earned a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in library science from what is now Case Western Reserve University. The former Roland Park resident was a librarian at the Enoch Pratt Free Library on Cathedral Street for 30 years until retiring in 1975.
NEWS
August 15, 2007
Eleanor F. "Ellie" Vernon-Williams, a retired librarian who restored an Eastern Shore home, died in her sleep Aug. 6 at the Caroline Home for Hospice in Denton. She was 83. Eleanor F. Dunham was born and raised in New Bedford, Mass., and earned a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in library science from what is now Case Western Reserve University. The former Roland Park resident was a librarian at the Enoch Pratt Free Library on Cathedral Street for 30 years until retiring in 1975.
NEWS
By Muphen R. Whitney | January 29, 1992
Veterinarian Lee Miller says he's worried the horse community doesn't know enough about the moldy corn threat this year.Miller, a vetin Woodsboro, Frederick County, who practices in Carroll, says Maryland horse owners didn't know about moldy corn poisoning during the last outbreak until a dozen horses had died.Moldy corn poisoning is frustrating for several reasons: It is almost impossible to detect; there are no known preventive measures other than not feeding corn; the disease has been considered incurable; and the animal must be dead to confirm the diagnosis.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2011
The turbo-charged guy with a head full of swirling salt-and-pepper hair sitting at the lower end of Grand Cru busily sketching most Saturday afternoons, dressed in faded blue jeans, bumpy tweed sport coat, Irish country farmers vest, shirt and tie, is the loquacious Kevin O'Malley. The Belvedere Square bar is O'Malley's home away from home, living room or branch office-studio. He comes here to think, draw, laugh, pick up a few ideas while quaffing a few cold ones with his usual cadre of boon companions.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1998
The homestead at 124 Bluestone Road is still "spiteful." Still full of a baby's venom. It looks as if it will soon slump into the ground, not with a soft, final sigh, but with an acrid, reverberating thud.Once the place was bright and hopeful, as the set designer for the movie "Beloved" intended. Then, haunted by the cinematic ghost of a murdered baby girl, the home slid into chaotic disrepair. Whitewash gave way to gray, weather-worn boards, and the place came to resemble a sorry rural wreck that spoke only of loss.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | November 12, 1991
Three rare, vintage outbuildings were moved yesterday to the Benson-Hammond House, where they become the first authentic structures in the county historical society's new truck farm museum.The buildings-- a corn crib, wash house and tack house -- have been sitting on the George Cromwell farm in Ferndale since the late 19th century. They were donated to the Ann Arundell County Historical Society by the Circle Cos., a diversified real estate group that is helping to develop the 250-acre Cromwell site.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | May 22, 1995
Shortly after World War II, the truck farming that had driven the economy of northern Anne Arundel County since the 1860s became part of a lost culture.So did the trucks that hauled strawberries, cantaloupes and cucumbers picked by immigrants, most of them Polish, to markets in Baltimore.The Ann Arrundell County Historical Society will provide a glimpse of that life at its fourth annual strawberry festival at the Benson-Hammond House. The festival will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 10. The rain date is June 11. Admission is free.
NEWS
April 19, 1994
The calamitous decline of tobacco farming -- because of low prices and falling demand -- underscores how Maryland's farming legacy is increasingly threatened.If builders of tract housing don't wipe out cultivated fields, changing habits will. Yet tobacco was so dominant in early Maryland that judicial bonds could be paid in cash or tobacco, with 100 pounds of nicotine leaves equaling one English pound of money.Tobacco growing in Anne Arundel County has for decades been a thing of the past.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1998
The homestead at 124 Bluestone Road is still "spiteful." Still full of a baby's venom. It looks as if it will soon slump into the ground, not with a soft, final sigh, but with an acrid, reverberating thud.Once the place was bright and hopeful, as the set designer for the movie "Beloved" intended. Then, haunted by the cinematic ghost of a murdered baby girl, the home slid into chaotic disrepair. Whitewash gave way to gray, weather-worn boards, and the place came to resemble a sorry rural wreck that spoke only of loss.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | December 14, 1995
Carole Jean Bertsch's photographs of women and children have been described in the magazine Voices of Women as "Haunting, sometimes absurd and theatrical, sometimes soulful and provocative." She often uses costumes and props with her figures, often hand-colors her photographs, and has used sites as varied as back yards, a corn crib, an abandoned gas station and tents at the Havre de Grace Fourth of July carnival. A show of her work from the last 15 years, called "Succumb to the Magic," is currently on view at the I. Brewster Gallery in Pikesville.
NEWS
By Muphen R. Whitney | January 29, 1992
Veterinarian Lee Miller says he's worried the horse community doesn't know enough about the moldy corn threat this year.Miller, a vetin Woodsboro, Frederick County, who practices in Carroll, says Maryland horse owners didn't know about moldy corn poisoning during the last outbreak until a dozen horses had died.Moldy corn poisoning is frustrating for several reasons: It is almost impossible to detect; there are no known preventive measures other than not feeding corn; the disease has been considered incurable; and the animal must be dead to confirm the diagnosis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Marissa Lowman | July 31, 2003
Get lost in a corn field at Chincoteague's 7.5-acre corn maze. The whole family can experience walking in circles at this huge maze, created in the shape of a blue crab. After you have completed the large maze, you can try the hay-bale maze, the rope maze or the kids' maze. In addition, there are pony rides, a petting zoo and a "Corn Crib" sandbox. Especially adventurous people can roam the twists and turns by flashlight on Friday and Saturday evenings. The Chincoteague Corn Maze, 36310 Corbin Hall Lane, Horntown, Va., is open 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Wednesdays, Thursdays and Sundays, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Fridays and 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturdays.
FEATURES
By Syd Kearney and Syd Kearney,Houston Chronicle | September 18, 1994
The morning sun is seeping through the weathered wooden walls of the Bunch homestead, and the porch offers a lazy moan as a visitor inspects the century-old construction.General Bunch shared this two-room cabin in Norris, Tenn., with his parents and 11 siblings. "I was just 8 years old but I drug the logs in from the mountains with a yoke of oxen," Bunch once recalled. "We was 12 miles from the nearest store where we could buy a bag of salt."Although Bunch is gone now, his stories are alive and are as much a part of the Museum of Appalachia as his beloved cabin.
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