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By Sylvia Carter and Sylvia Carter,NEWSDAY | January 2, 2002
In Blue Plate Specials and Blue Ribbon Chefs (Lebhar-Friedman Books, 2001, $24.95), Jane and Michael Stern, the road food enthusiasts, hit the highways in search of more down-home cooks in out-of-the-way places. Frito pie (in the book they call it Fritos pie) was a beloved specialty of the Woolworth's lunch counter on the Plaza in Santa Fe, N.M. Frito pie "dramatically changes consistency while you eat it," the Sterns write, with the crisp corn chips becoming soft as the spicy meat and beans soak into them.
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NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | May 23, 2007
No, it's not a rumor. It's Rumor Mill (8069 Tiber Alley, 410-461-0041), a new restaurant that's opened in Ellicott City where Sidestreets used to be. The space has been redesigned and spruced up, says Matthew Milani, who with his two partners also owns Cacao Lane across the street. (The bartender, he says, painted the Japanese-inspired murals.) Milani describes Rumor Mill's food as "American-Japanese fusion" and "seafood forward." That means entrees like the signature wasabi-crusted snapper with plum sauce served with haricots verts ($25)
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BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | May 21, 1991
It's snack time in America.Because of a boom in East Coasters' appetite for corn chips, popcorn and pretzels, the world's biggest snack-food maker announced yesterday that it would build a plant in Aberdeen.Frito-Lay Inc. said it plans to start construction during the summer on a plant that will employ 300 workers by 1992 and may eventually have a work force of 500.To persuade Frito-Lay to build its first plant in Maryland, the state agreed to give Harford County a $500,000 grant to improve its sewer system and to provide up to $100,000 for training for the plant's workers, said Marilyn Corbett, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | July 1, 2006
As in summers past, this year we'll be across the Atlantic in Paris on July 4, but we are planning a dinner for friends, complete with an all-American menu. Our guests will include several American and French friends who live in Paris and are happy to celebrate U.S. Independence Day. The apartment we are renting has a tiny kitchen with an oven without a thermostat and minimal (think 4 square feet) counter space, so I will do the cooking in stages. I already know what I'm going to serve, though.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | July 1, 2006
As in summers past, this year we'll be across the Atlantic in Paris on July 4, but we are planning a dinner for friends, complete with an all-American menu. Our guests will include several American and French friends who live in Paris and are happy to celebrate U.S. Independence Day. The apartment we are renting has a tiny kitchen with an oven without a thermostat and minimal (think 4 square feet) counter space, so I will do the cooking in stages. I already know what I'm going to serve, though.
FEATURES
By Andrew Schloss and Andrew Schloss,Special to The Sun | April 13, 1994
A child's hunger is fleeting. Challenge it with a spinach-speckled casserole and it will vanish, but greet it with some fun and it just might explode in excitement.It is a cruel irony of my profession that the less I cook the better my three children like it. They reject without tasting anything sauced or leafy, but have praise unending for naked pasta (Is there cheese on this spaghetti?) and canned baked beans (This is the best you ever made, Dad!). For many years I resented every meal I uncanned for them, but then everything changed.
NEWS
By SUSAN NICHOLSON and SUSAN NICHOLSON,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | June 20, 1999
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost- cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick.Sunday/FamilyMake Dad happy today and watch him prepare his own Grilled Steaks.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | May 23, 2007
No, it's not a rumor. It's Rumor Mill (8069 Tiber Alley, 410-461-0041), a new restaurant that's opened in Ellicott City where Sidestreets used to be. The space has been redesigned and spruced up, says Matthew Milani, who with his two partners also owns Cacao Lane across the street. (The bartender, he says, painted the Japanese-inspired murals.) Milani describes Rumor Mill's food as "American-Japanese fusion" and "seafood forward." That means entrees like the signature wasabi-crusted snapper with plum sauce served with haricots verts ($25)
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | September 29, 1992
Do you control your food cravings, or do they control you?Everybody has cravings -- for chocolate, for sweets, for salty or crunchy foods. Some people handle them well, others go berserk and "eat the whole thing."Here are a few things you can do to restore a little sanity to your eating.* Trash the "forbidden foods' list.Do you have a mental list of foods you believe you shouldn't eat? Often, abstinence makes the heart grow fonder. When you finally give in, the bottom of the bag is the only place to stop.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | March 25, 1992
CHICAGO -- You've heard of potato chips? Microchips? Poker chips? Blue chips? Even cow chips?Now, compliments of a Los Angeles toy company called Street Kids and just in time for the "Batman" movie sequel, we will have Bat Chips, a corn tortilla chip in the shape of the caped crusader.The chips will be the first in a wave of licensed products that are set to debut with the movie "Batman Returns," which premieres June 19. The Warner Brothers movie stars Michael Keaton, Michelle Pfeiffer and Danny DeVito.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Carter and Sylvia Carter,NEWSDAY | January 2, 2002
In Blue Plate Specials and Blue Ribbon Chefs (Lebhar-Friedman Books, 2001, $24.95), Jane and Michael Stern, the road food enthusiasts, hit the highways in search of more down-home cooks in out-of-the-way places. Frito pie (in the book they call it Fritos pie) was a beloved specialty of the Woolworth's lunch counter on the Plaza in Santa Fe, N.M. Frito pie "dramatically changes consistency while you eat it," the Sterns write, with the crisp corn chips becoming soft as the spicy meat and beans soak into them.
NEWS
By SUSAN NICHOLSON and SUSAN NICHOLSON,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | June 20, 1999
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost- cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick.Sunday/FamilyMake Dad happy today and watch him prepare his own Grilled Steaks.
FEATURES
By EATING WELL | September 18, 1996
There's not a jar of salsa on the market that can't be improved with a squeeze of lime or a little fresh cilantro. A tireless partner for tortilla chips, salsa really begins to swing with the addition of chopped vegetables, beans or even fruits. Add two or three simple ingredients and commercial salsa becomes an inventive homemade condiment to dress up grilled meat, seafood or vegetables.Serve this salsa as a dip for chips or as a relish to accompany grilled pork tenderloin or chicken.Roasted corn salsaMakes about 1 1/2 cups2 small ears fresh corn, shucked3/4 cup prepared tomato salsa1 tablespoon fresh lime juice1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro, or to taste1/8 teaspoon ground cuminHeat a large, heavy skillet, preferably cast-iron, over medium-high heat.
FEATURES
By Andrew Schloss and Andrew Schloss,Special to The Sun | April 13, 1994
A child's hunger is fleeting. Challenge it with a spinach-speckled casserole and it will vanish, but greet it with some fun and it just might explode in excitement.It is a cruel irony of my profession that the less I cook the better my three children like it. They reject without tasting anything sauced or leafy, but have praise unending for naked pasta (Is there cheese on this spaghetti?) and canned baked beans (This is the best you ever made, Dad!). For many years I resented every meal I uncanned for them, but then everything changed.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | September 29, 1992
Do you control your food cravings, or do they control you?Everybody has cravings -- for chocolate, for sweets, for salty or crunchy foods. Some people handle them well, others go berserk and "eat the whole thing."Here are a few things you can do to restore a little sanity to your eating.* Trash the "forbidden foods' list.Do you have a mental list of foods you believe you shouldn't eat? Often, abstinence makes the heart grow fonder. When you finally give in, the bottom of the bag is the only place to stop.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | March 25, 1992
CHICAGO -- You've heard of potato chips? Microchips? Poker chips? Blue chips? Even cow chips?Now, compliments of a Los Angeles toy company called Street Kids and just in time for the "Batman" movie sequel, we will have Bat Chips, a corn tortilla chip in the shape of the caped crusader.The chips will be the first in a wave of licensed products that are set to debut with the movie "Batman Returns," which premieres June 19. The Warner Brothers movie stars Michael Keaton, Michelle Pfeiffer and Danny DeVito.
BUSINESS
By Tom Schmitz and TC and Tom Schmitz and TC,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 16, 1992
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- When Intel Corp. announced plans to launch a $250 million advertising campaign to peddle its integrated circuits on national television last fall, some thought the premier maker of electronic computer brains had lost its corporate mind.These were silicon chips, the critics protested, not corn snacks. The public would never understand. And besides, semiconductor companies were supposed to compete over who had the best technology, not the best TV spot.It hasn't evolved into a Coke and Pepsi war -- yet. But marketing experts say Silicon Valley companies have a lot more in common with soft-drink manufacturers than they used to. And to get their message across, they are increasingly turning to consumer-oriented advertising, including television.
FEATURES
By EATING WELL | September 18, 1996
There's not a jar of salsa on the market that can't be improved with a squeeze of lime or a little fresh cilantro. A tireless partner for tortilla chips, salsa really begins to swing with the addition of chopped vegetables, beans or even fruits. Add two or three simple ingredients and commercial salsa becomes an inventive homemade condiment to dress up grilled meat, seafood or vegetables.Serve this salsa as a dip for chips or as a relish to accompany grilled pork tenderloin or chicken.Roasted corn salsaMakes about 1 1/2 cups2 small ears fresh corn, shucked3/4 cup prepared tomato salsa1 tablespoon fresh lime juice1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro, or to taste1/8 teaspoon ground cuminHeat a large, heavy skillet, preferably cast-iron, over medium-high heat.
BUSINESS
By Tom Schmitz and TC and Tom Schmitz and TC,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 16, 1992
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- When Intel Corp. announced plans to launch a $250 million advertising campaign to peddle its integrated circuits on national television last fall, some thought the premier maker of electronic computer brains had lost its corporate mind.These were silicon chips, the critics protested, not corn snacks. The public would never understand. And besides, semiconductor companies were supposed to compete over who had the best technology, not the best TV spot.It hasn't evolved into a Coke and Pepsi war -- yet. But marketing experts say Silicon Valley companies have a lot more in common with soft-drink manufacturers than they used to. And to get their message across, they are increasingly turning to consumer-oriented advertising, including television.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | May 21, 1991
It's snack time in America.Because of a boom in East Coasters' appetite for corn chips, popcorn and pretzels, the world's biggest snack-food maker announced yesterday that it would build a plant in Aberdeen.Frito-Lay Inc. said it plans to start construction during the summer on a plant that will employ 300 workers by 1992 and may eventually have a work force of 500.To persuade Frito-Lay to build its first plant in Maryland, the state agreed to give Harford County a $500,000 grant to improve its sewer system and to provide up to $100,000 for training for the plant's workers, said Marilyn Corbett, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development.
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