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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1996
She has rallied from reactions to too much medication, an irregular heartbeat, a chip in her ankle, a slew of different training methods and a forgettable 4-year-old campaign.Cormorant's Flight has been through a lot, but when they leave the gate in the Grade II, $200,000 Barbara Fritchie Handicap today at Laurel Park, she will be among the horses to beat.The 6-year-old mare, a study in persistence, has been made the 4-to-1 overnight favorite by track handicapper Clem Florio in a field dotted by high-quality invaders from elsewhere.
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2002
Nancy Alberts, her weathered 56-year-old face looking dazed, nearly floated into the winner's circle, as if this were a dream. Her magic gelding, Magic Weisner, had won the $100,000 Maryland Juvenile Championship Stakes on the last day of the year at Laurel Park. For Alberts, a trainer, no, a nurturer, of thoroughbreds for three decades, this was her crowning achievement. She had dedicated her life to horses. She regarded them as her children, hanging stockings at Christmas for each horse alongside the stocking for her son. Four years ago, she nearly died when a horse kicked her across a stall.
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SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1996
If Cormorant's Flight's recent performances are any indication, Peter Angelos may be headed for a very successful year.The Orioles owner's mare delivered another top-flight effort at Laurel Park yesterday, leading from wire to wire over 1 1/8 miles to dominate the $75,000 Maryland Race Writers Handicap.Distance was the question for the daughter of Cormorant out of Double Suez. She had won the Francis Scott Key Stakes three weeks earlier -- but at six furlongs.But, after getting distracted briefly at the three-eighths pole, Cormorant's Flight responded to jockey Mario Pino's urging with another strong move and won going away.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 1, 1998
Officially, the double-crested cormorant is a protected species, its safety guarded by federal law. But on the Lake Ontario shoreline west of Watertown, N.Y., the long-necked black birds have become a pest to anglers, who say the growing colonies of cormorants are devouring smallmouth bass and, along with them, the livelihood of people who sell bait and run charter fishing trips.This week, wildlife officials visiting an island nesting ground discovered an unusually shocking environmental crime: more than 800 cormorants slaughtered by shotgun fire.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1996
A ground-saving trip and a wealth of late kick enabled Cormorant's Flight to rally from fifth yesterday to win the $53,950 Francis Scott Key Stakes at Laurel Park.In a field bulging with speed horses going six furlongs, jockey Mario Pino settled his mount to the inside behind pacesetters Calipha and Pleasant Dilemma and came with a rush to prevail by 1 3/4 lengths over another late-running long shot, Princess Could Be.The two entries who drew the heaviest play, Calipha and Two Punch Lil, finished at the back of the seven-horse pack.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | November 4, 1992
Every year, Hal Clagett seems to come up with a stakes runner.But only one of his homebreds, Little Bold John, has been a year-end Maryland-bred champion.Now Clagett-bred Carnirainbow could be the second.The stout-looking filly, with a massive chest and chunky hindquarters, sprinted away from Cormorant's Flight at about the half-mile pole yesterday and won the $60,000 What A Summer Stakes at Laurel Race Course.Her time -- 1 minute, 26 4/5 seconds -- for the seven furlongs was not especially fast.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | November 12, 1993
Laurel-Pimlico president Joe De Francis was not discouraged by the track's handle on the first Wednesday of live racing this fall."We did about $1 million in state and I thought that was good, considering that the same Wednesday last year was Veterans Day," said De Francis. "It was a relevant start."What you have to compare is what we did recently with simulcasts on Wednesday and live racing Sunday and the live card Wednesday and Sunday simulcasts we're now running. The total gross business is about equal.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2002
Nancy Alberts, her weathered 56-year-old face looking dazed, nearly floated into the winner's circle, as if this were a dream. Her magic gelding, Magic Weisner, had won the $100,000 Maryland Juvenile Championship Stakes on the last day of the year at Laurel Park. For Alberts, a trainer, no, a nurturer, of thoroughbreds for three decades, this was her crowning achievement. She had dedicated her life to horses. She regarded them as her children, hanging stockings at Christmas for each horse alongside the stocking for her son. Four years ago, she nearly died when a horse kicked her across a stall.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | August 8, 1993
Overnight, Peter G. Angelos went from a low-profile Maryland thoroughbred owner to an instant sports celebrity when he became the new majority owner of the Orioles.Even though the Baltimore lawyer bid $173 million for the team, he has not had the reputation as a big spender in the horse business.He purchased his most successful runner, Cormorant's Flight, privately for a reported $17,500. It was an astute buy. The filly is a multiple stakes winner and has earned more than $150,000."It's good to see that he is getting some nice horses," said Matthew Kern, who along with his wife, Deane, boards most of Angelos' horses at Marathon South Training Center in Hydes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 1, 1998
Officially, the double-crested cormorant is a protected species, its safety guarded by federal law. But on the Lake Ontario shoreline west of Watertown, N.Y., the long-necked black birds have become a pest to anglers, who say the growing colonies of cormorants are devouring smallmouth bass and, along with them, the livelihood of people who sell bait and run charter fishing trips.This week, wildlife officials visiting an island nesting ground discovered an unusually shocking environmental crime: more than 800 cormorants slaughtered by shotgun fire.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1996
She has rallied from reactions to too much medication, an irregular heartbeat, a chip in her ankle, a slew of different training methods and a forgettable 4-year-old campaign.Cormorant's Flight has been through a lot, but when they leave the gate in the Grade II, $200,000 Barbara Fritchie Handicap today at Laurel Park, she will be among the horses to beat.The 6-year-old mare, a study in persistence, has been made the 4-to-1 overnight favorite by track handicapper Clem Florio in a field dotted by high-quality invaders from elsewhere.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1996
If Cormorant's Flight's recent performances are any indication, Peter Angelos may be headed for a very successful year.The Orioles owner's mare delivered another top-flight effort at Laurel Park yesterday, leading from wire to wire over 1 1/8 miles to dominate the $75,000 Maryland Race Writers Handicap.Distance was the question for the daughter of Cormorant out of Double Suez. She had won the Francis Scott Key Stakes three weeks earlier -- but at six furlongs.But, after getting distracted briefly at the three-eighths pole, Cormorant's Flight responded to jockey Mario Pino's urging with another strong move and won going away.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1996
A ground-saving trip and a wealth of late kick enabled Cormorant's Flight to rally from fifth yesterday to win the $53,950 Francis Scott Key Stakes at Laurel Park.In a field bulging with speed horses going six furlongs, jockey Mario Pino settled his mount to the inside behind pacesetters Calipha and Pleasant Dilemma and came with a rush to prevail by 1 3/4 lengths over another late-running long shot, Princess Could Be.The two entries who drew the heaviest play, Calipha and Two Punch Lil, finished at the back of the seven-horse pack.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | November 12, 1993
Laurel-Pimlico president Joe De Francis was not discouraged by the track's handle on the first Wednesday of live racing this fall."We did about $1 million in state and I thought that was good, considering that the same Wednesday last year was Veterans Day," said De Francis. "It was a relevant start."What you have to compare is what we did recently with simulcasts on Wednesday and live racing Sunday and the live card Wednesday and Sunday simulcasts we're now running. The total gross business is about equal.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | August 8, 1993
Overnight, Peter G. Angelos went from a low-profile Maryland thoroughbred owner to an instant sports celebrity when he became the new majority owner of the Orioles.Even though the Baltimore lawyer bid $173 million for the team, he has not had the reputation as a big spender in the horse business.He purchased his most successful runner, Cormorant's Flight, privately for a reported $17,500. It was an astute buy. The filly is a multiple stakes winner and has earned more than $150,000."It's good to see that he is getting some nice horses," said Matthew Kern, who along with his wife, Deane, boards most of Angelos' horses at Marathon South Training Center in Hydes.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | November 4, 1992
Every year, Hal Clagett seems to come up with a stakes runner.But only one of his homebreds, Little Bold John, has been a year-end Maryland-bred champion.Now Clagett-bred Carnirainbow could be the second.The stout-looking filly, with a massive chest and chunky hindquarters, sprinted away from Cormorant's Flight at about the half-mile pole yesterday and won the $60,000 What A Summer Stakes at Laurel Race Course.Her time -- 1 minute, 26 4/5 seconds -- for the seven furlongs was not especially fast.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1997
By the time Seattle Slew arrived at Pimlico for the 102nd Preakness on May 21, 1977, the fairy tale was one-third told.A modest $17,500 purchase as a yearling, Seattle Slew had starred in the rags-to-riches story of winning the Kentucky Derby. His owners -- two fun-loving couples in their 30s dubbed the "Slew Crew" -- were the darlings of American racing.The nation's sports fans watched eagerly as Seattle Slew -- this dark-brown blaze of speed so awkward as a baby that his handlers called him "Baby Huey" after the clumsy comic-strip character -- tried to do what no horse had ever done: win the Triple Crown without having lost a race.
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