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Coriolanus

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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- It's difficult to believe that until now, Shakespeare's political tragedy, "Coriolanus," has never been professionally produced in Washington, political hub of the nation.It can't be for lack of relevance. The play's commentary is timeless. An examination of military nobility vs. the common masses, it just happened to open at the Shakespeare Theatre at the Folger on the same day charges were dropped against former Marine Corps Lt. Col. Oliver L. North.Admittedly, when you see this production, you begin to understand why "Coriolanus" is one of Shakespeare's least produced plays.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Baltimore's continually blossoming theater scene has another bud. Cohesion Theatre Company , to be based in the Highlandtown Arts and Culture District, will debut in November with a production of Shakespeare's "Coriolanus. " (Given the arrival of Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, the Bard appears to be on a roll this season in Baltimore.) The Cohesion ensemble also plans to stage two Baltimore premieres: Tom Horan's "Thirteen Dead Husbands" in March, Anna Moench's "The Pillow Book" next summer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Baltimore's continually blossoming theater scene has another bud. Cohesion Theatre Company , to be based in the Highlandtown Arts and Culture District, will debut in November with a production of Shakespeare's "Coriolanus. " (Given the arrival of Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, the Bard appears to be on a roll this season in Baltimore.) The Cohesion ensemble also plans to stage two Baltimore premieres: Tom Horan's "Thirteen Dead Husbands" in March, Anna Moench's "The Pillow Book" next summer.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 22, 2007
Just about the only character who comes off well in the Royal Shakespeare Company's Coriolanus is the title character's mother, Volumnia. And in the production at the Kennedy Center - part of the Shakespeare in Washington festival - she comes off better than well. She's a titan. Negotiating for peace on the Washington stage, Janet Suzman's staunch, determined Volumnia is the type of shrewd, relentless diplomat who could broker treaties on any level - from the family dinner table to the Middle East.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 17, 2005
The ancient Roman protagonist of Shakespeare's Coriolanus is a leader in desperate need of an image makeover. Judging from its freewheeling, modern-dress production of the play, the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company clearly felt the same way about this script. I am hardly one to object to taking liberties with Shakespeare, and few would claim that Coriolanus is one of the Bard's masterpieces (the two other productions I've seen were also updated). But liberties should contribute to, not detract from, the work.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 22, 2007
Just about the only character who comes off well in the Royal Shakespeare Company's Coriolanus is the title character's mother, Volumnia. And in the production at the Kennedy Center - part of the Shakespeare in Washington festival - she comes off better than well. She's a titan. Negotiating for peace on the Washington stage, Janet Suzman's staunch, determined Volumnia is the type of shrewd, relentless diplomat who could broker treaties on any level - from the family dinner table to the Middle East.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 26, 2000
Shakespeare reveals so little of the characters' inner life in "Coriolanus" that a director can sway an audience's sympathy with his interpretation. However, at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre, Michael Kahn takes a cold, cynical drama and turns the temperature down even farther. Updating the action to pre-World War II Italy, Kahn's opening scene shows an angry group of working-class protesters bearing placards with such slogans as "Food for the people" and "Free corn now." You might think you were watching a play by Clifford Odets, instead of Shakespeare's last tragedy.
NEWS
By WILLIAM HYDER and WILLIAM HYDER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 2005
Shakespeare's Coriolanus, presented by the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company through Nov. 19, is a tragedy about politics and personalities. The title character is a strong man who is destroyed because he won't play the political game. Director Ian Gallanar, in a program note, says he treated the script the way jazz musicians treat a melody: "riffing on it rather than playing it note for note with technical perfection." In his version, the dialogue is trimmed, scenes are rearranged, speeches are swapped.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 20, 2000
Shakespeare's last tragedy, "Coriolanus," currently in previews at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre, traces the journey of an arrogant Roman military leader from hero to traitor. The production, directed by Michael Kahn, stars Andrew Long. It features the largest cast in the Shakespeare Theatre's history. The updated design features costumes by Jess Goldstein that suggest the fascist regime of Mussolini and a set by Walt Spangler highlighted by a giant staircase that combines the feel of both classical Rome and art deco.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2007
HISTORY CIVIL WAR DAYS Whether you're a Civil War buff or just interested in Maryland history, you'll want to visit Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine or Hampton National Historic Site this weekend for the annual Civil War Days. Visitors can see a huge Union encampment, observe cannon-firing demonstrations, watch a tattoo ceremony (7 p.m. Saturday at the fort), hear a concert by the 2nd South Carolina String Band (2 p.m. Sunday at Hampton) and learn about Maryland's role in the war, including why citizens were arrested for singing "Maryland, My Maryland" and how Union soldiers imposed martial law in Baltimore City and County.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 17, 2005
The ancient Roman protagonist of Shakespeare's Coriolanus is a leader in desperate need of an image makeover. Judging from its freewheeling, modern-dress production of the play, the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company clearly felt the same way about this script. I am hardly one to object to taking liberties with Shakespeare, and few would claim that Coriolanus is one of the Bard's masterpieces (the two other productions I've seen were also updated). But liberties should contribute to, not detract from, the work.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 26, 2000
Shakespeare reveals so little of the characters' inner life in "Coriolanus" that a director can sway an audience's sympathy with his interpretation. However, at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre, Michael Kahn takes a cold, cynical drama and turns the temperature down even farther. Updating the action to pre-World War II Italy, Kahn's opening scene shows an angry group of working-class protesters bearing placards with such slogans as "Food for the people" and "Free corn now." You might think you were watching a play by Clifford Odets, instead of Shakespeare's last tragedy.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- It's difficult to believe that until now, Shakespeare's political tragedy, "Coriolanus," has never been professionally produced in Washington, political hub of the nation.It can't be for lack of relevance. The play's commentary is timeless. An examination of military nobility vs. the common masses, it just happened to open at the Shakespeare Theatre at the Folger on the same day charges were dropped against former Marine Corps Lt. Col. Oliver L. North.Admittedly, when you see this production, you begin to understand why "Coriolanus" is one of Shakespeare's least produced plays.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 8, 2006
Shakespeare in Washington Move over, Stratford-Upon-Avon, England. Make way, Stratford, Ontario. Washington will be the international Shakespeare hub for the first six months of 2007. That's when the city hosts "Shakespeare in Washington," a multidisciplinary festival featuring plays, films, operas, concerts and exhibits by almost 50 organizations ranging from Russia's Kirov Ballet to New York's Tiny Ninja Theater and Washington's National Building Museum.
FEATURES
By Peter Marks and Peter Marks,Newsday | April 20, 1992
TV or not TV, that was the question. Whether it was nobler for an acclaimed English classical actor to play a tormented Shakespearean antihero in Stratford-upon-Avon or a two-faced millionaire on a hit sitcom in Hollywood . . .Actually, if you watch "Cheers," you know how Roger Rees answered the question. He declined "Coriolanus," said yes to prime time, and for a year and a half immersed himself in Robin Colcord, the charmingly despicable playboy who re-broke Kirstie Alley's all-too-battered heart.
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