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By Seattle Times | October 2, 1991
The following quick and easy recipe was prepared by CeCe Sullivan, home economist on the staff of The Seattle Times, based on an idea from Mitch Sullivan.) Salmon with Coriander Pesto1 medium clove garlic, peeled and minced2 tablespoons pine nuts1 cup packed coriander (cilantro) leaves1 tablespoon margarineteaspoon saltFreshly ground black pepper to taste2 pounds salmon filletPut the garlic and pine nuts into a food processor; mince finely. Add the coriander and chop finely. Add the margarine, salt and several grindings of black pepper.
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By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | October 17, 2007
Where can I find an herb plant known as Vietnamese coriander or daun laksa, "laksa leaf"? I found the fresh herb in an Asian market, but I'd prefer to have my own plant. Finding this herb really can be tricky because it goes by so many names: Vietnamese coriander, Vietnamese mint, daun laksa, daun kesam and rau ram, among others. All those common names boil down to one botanical name, polygonum odoratum, a member of the buckwheat family. Its flavor is distinctive, and the herb is used in cooking in Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand.
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By Barbara Albright and Barbara Albright,Contributing Writer | September 5, 1993
Thai cooking and restaurants seem to be the latest Asian cuisine to tantalize the taste buds of Americans.Just as we are beginning to understand the lingo of Chinese restaurants, along comes a brand new set of ingredients and mystifying menu items to be deciphered.Fortunately, there are some overlapping ingredients between the cuisines. The following is a list of a few of the most common ingredients.* Fresh coriander: Also known as cilantro and Chinese parsley. It is probably one of the most heavily consumed herbs in the world.
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By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | May 9, 2007
Charmoula is the traditional Moroccan seasoning for fish, and having a version in your repertoire makes a North African-influenced dinner as close as your food processor. Here's one we like. Robin Mather Jenkins writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Moroccan Baked Fish Serves 4 -- Total time: 28 minutes 2 cloves garlic 1 piece (1-inch long) ginger root, grated 3/4 cup each, loosely packed: flat-leaf parsley, cilantro leaves 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons orange juice plus more for thinning 1 teaspoon each: cumin, hot paprika, lemon zest 1/2 teaspoon coriander seed 1/8 teaspoon each: saffron (optional)
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By GAIL FORMAN | August 28, 1994
Cumin smells like old socks. Yet what would chili be without cumin -- or curry or sausages or pickles or Edam cheese? The predominant scent in most curry powders and chili powders is cumin.Cumin is the yellowish-brown, dried fruit of a small plant in the parsley family that is native to the Upper Nile.A lot of experts say cumin tastes like caraway but that makes me wonder what's wrong with their taste buds. To me cumin tastes earthy, pungent, even a little bitter. The seeds of cumin do look something like caraway seeds -- at least they are both small and oval.
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By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | October 17, 2007
Where can I find an herb plant known as Vietnamese coriander or daun laksa, "laksa leaf"? I found the fresh herb in an Asian market, but I'd prefer to have my own plant. Finding this herb really can be tricky because it goes by so many names: Vietnamese coriander, Vietnamese mint, daun laksa, daun kesam and rau ram, among others. All those common names boil down to one botanical name, polygonum odoratum, a member of the buckwheat family. Its flavor is distinctive, and the herb is used in cooking in Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand.
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By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 2005
Marie Auer from Catonsville was hoping to find the recipe for the delicious pumpkin soup that is served at the Au Bon Pan restaurant chain. While we were unable to locate the recipe for the soup served at the restaurant, the recipe sent in by Leo Forsberg from Bordentown, N.J., that I tested made a very tasty soup. Unlike many pumpkin soup recipes, his contains no cream, yet when pureed is beautifully thick and smooth. The addition of the lemon juice and the spices, the coriander in particular, gives the soup a savory, instead of sweet, flavor.
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April 1, 1992
This weekend is a real treat for cooking show junkies because two popular television chefs, Pierre Franey and Nathalie Dupree, introduce their new shows."
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By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | May 9, 2007
Charmoula is the traditional Moroccan seasoning for fish, and having a version in your repertoire makes a North African-influenced dinner as close as your food processor. Here's one we like. Robin Mather Jenkins writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Moroccan Baked Fish Serves 4 -- Total time: 28 minutes 2 cloves garlic 1 piece (1-inch long) ginger root, grated 3/4 cup each, loosely packed: flat-leaf parsley, cilantro leaves 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons orange juice plus more for thinning 1 teaspoon each: cumin, hot paprika, lemon zest 1/2 teaspoon coriander seed 1/8 teaspoon each: saffron (optional)
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By Rob Kasper | January 18, 1998
I CAME TO AN appreciation of cauliflower late in life.When I was a kid, cauliflower was one of those foods I was "supposed to eat." My dad, in an effort to stir up interest in the winter vegetable, would recite a couple of lines of corny poetry -- "See the little cauliflower, growing sweeter by the hour" -- as the steamed forms were placed before our assembled clan. My brothers and I would push the dreaded florets of cauliflower to the edges of our plates, and roll our eyes at our dad's performance.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 2005
Marie Auer from Catonsville was hoping to find the recipe for the delicious pumpkin soup that is served at the Au Bon Pan restaurant chain. While we were unable to locate the recipe for the soup served at the restaurant, the recipe sent in by Leo Forsberg from Bordentown, N.J., that I tested made a very tasty soup. Unlike many pumpkin soup recipes, his contains no cream, yet when pureed is beautifully thick and smooth. The addition of the lemon juice and the spices, the coriander in particular, gives the soup a savory, instead of sweet, flavor.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2005
You come home from work tired, hungry and with no idea of what to make for dinner. You don't even crack open a cookbook during these daily crises, because you know that somewhere in every recipe's list of ingredients is something you do not have. Instead, you make that tried-and-true grilled chicken breast with an improvised mustard sauce. But you could use more ideas for meals whose ingredients will, without fail, be in your head and at your fingertips. That's where the brother-and-sister team Robert Hildebrand and Carol Hildebrand come in, with 500 3-Ingredient Recipes (Fair Winds Press, 2004, $19.95)
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By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2005
At first glance, The World of Spice (Kyle Books, 2004, $29.95) seems almost as mysterious as its title subject. Like a display of spices, colorful and full of secret potential, the book teases with beautiful pictures, detailed food histories and exotically named recipes. But as with a tantalizing item on the spice rack, it is not quite clear at first what to do with it. When I first flipped through the index and skimmed some of the book's 200 recipes, organized by world region, few jumped out as realistic cooking projects.
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By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2002
Some cooks dream of roaming through the outdoor markets of exotic lands and learning regional specialties from the locals. If you've never lived that fantasy you can at least benefit from the experiences of Chris and Carolyn Caldicott, who have produced an ambitious, beautiful and informative book that will whet the appetites of both cooks and travelers. In The Spice Routes (Publishers Group West, $35) they offer an accessible culinary guide to the most famous of these routes: the overland Silk Route and China, the Mediterranean path the Phoenicians traveled carrying spices through Europe and the routes taken by Arab caravans and the Venetians.
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | October 1, 2000
Some like it hot. But some like an interplay of flavors, with lime and fresh coriander balancing cumin and red chile; marinades made from achiote and sour orange; and tacos stuffed with seared tilapia fillets, shredded cabbage and tomatillo salsa. Those people should head straight to Blue Agave, Federal Hill's new restaurant and tequila bar. Chef-owner Michael Marx's highly seasoned but complex creations will come as a shock -- a pleasant one -- to those who equate Southwestern and Mexican food with enchiladas and refried beans.
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By Rob Kasper | January 18, 1998
I CAME TO AN appreciation of cauliflower late in life.When I was a kid, cauliflower was one of those foods I was "supposed to eat." My dad, in an effort to stir up interest in the winter vegetable, would recite a couple of lines of corny poetry -- "See the little cauliflower, growing sweeter by the hour" -- as the steamed forms were placed before our assembled clan. My brothers and I would push the dreaded florets of cauliflower to the edges of our plates, and roll our eyes at our dad's performance.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2005
You come home from work tired, hungry and with no idea of what to make for dinner. You don't even crack open a cookbook during these daily crises, because you know that somewhere in every recipe's list of ingredients is something you do not have. Instead, you make that tried-and-true grilled chicken breast with an improvised mustard sauce. But you could use more ideas for meals whose ingredients will, without fail, be in your head and at your fingertips. That's where the brother-and-sister team Robert Hildebrand and Carol Hildebrand come in, with 500 3-Ingredient Recipes (Fair Winds Press, 2004, $19.95)
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By Steven Raichlen and Steven Raichlen,Contributing Writer | August 12, 1992
Ten years ago, few Americans had ever heard of or tasted cilantro. Today, progressive cooks can't seem to cook without it. This pungent green herb has been turning up in everything from salsas to salads and stir-fries. Once available only at ethnic markets, it has crept into restaurants and supermarkets.Cilantro (pronounced see-LAN-tro) may be a relative newcomer to the United States, but it has long been a mainstay of many of the world's great cuisines. The pungent leaf is a cornerstone of Mexican cooking.
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By Maria Hiaasen and Maria Hiaasen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 1997
In the Kitchen Encounters feature in yesterday's A La Carte section, the name of systems analyst Ron Leve was misspelled.The Sun regrets the error.Who says single men don't cook? Ron Lev prepares soups and stews your mother would envy. In fact, he expects his epitaph will label him "Souperman," thanks to all the soups he's shared with neighbors and friends.Lev, a systems analyst at Fort Meade, made the transformation from mere recipe-reading chemist to verified cook years ago while hovering over a soup pot."
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By GAIL FORMAN | August 28, 1994
Cumin smells like old socks. Yet what would chili be without cumin -- or curry or sausages or pickles or Edam cheese? The predominant scent in most curry powders and chili powders is cumin.Cumin is the yellowish-brown, dried fruit of a small plant in the parsley family that is native to the Upper Nile.A lot of experts say cumin tastes like caraway but that makes me wonder what's wrong with their taste buds. To me cumin tastes earthy, pungent, even a little bitter. The seeds of cumin do look something like caraway seeds -- at least they are both small and oval.
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