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Coretta Scott King

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By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2011
The creation of a memorial garden to honor Coretta Scott King will ensure "that generations are going to know this incredible woman," King's daughter told a crowd of hundreds Thursday. "The extraordinary thing about Coretta Scott King was that before she met Martin Luther King Jr., she was already on a mission to change the face of America," Bernice A. King told those assembled in Edgewater for the unveiling of the memorial. Her mother, who died in 2006 at the age of 84, had been an activist before marrying the civil rights leader and became his greatest fan, greatest adviser and greatest supporter, she said.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
The pastor who works with some of Anne Arundel County's poorest residents and a longtime civil rights activist will be the keynote speakers at coming events in the county honoring the work of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Both the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Breakfast and the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Awards Dinner, which have become traditional January functions in the county, also recognize residents for work that follows the spirit...
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NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | December 10, 1999
MEMPHIS -- Beneath the motel balcony where a sniper's bullet killed the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., a granite plaque has long borne a Biblical passage that hints at one of his family's strongest beliefs: His assassin did not act alone."
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2012
As a small-business owner on Clay Street, the rough-and-tumble Annapolis community where he grew up, Michael McFarland was keenly aware of the need for mentors for the neighborhood's youth. In the early 1970s, when he owned a laundromat there, he began an athletic club that allowed hundreds of low-income kids from the area to compete in organized sports like basketball and flag football. As a coach, McFarland, nicknamed "Little Buck" for his short stature, not only taught sportsmanship; he exalted the importance of education.
NEWS
April 5, 2006
The Maryland Memorial Tribute to Mrs. Coretta Scott King and Dr. Martin Lu ther King Jr. combined speeches, music, poetry, film and prayer in an event Sun day at Anne Arundel Community College. The event, which also marked the 38th anniversary of the Rev. King's assassination, helped raise $5,000 toward a memorial to the couple planned on the college's Arnold campus.
NEWS
February 29, 1996
The 10th Duke of Atholl, 64, one of Scotland's richest landowners and the head of the only private army in Britain, died of a stroke Tuesday in London. Born George Iain Murray, he succeeded to the title in 1957. He had served as president of the Scottish Landowners Federation, president of the National Trust for Scotland, chairman of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution and captain of the House of Lords bridge team.Bernice McMurry Scott, 91, mother of Coretta Scott King and mother-in-law of Martin Luther King Jr., died Monday in Atlanta.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | April 3, 2006
On an occasion of remembrance for the civil rights struggles of the late Coretta Scott King and of her slain husband, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., one of the most stirring tributes came from the smallest speaker to address the crowd. "I stand here before you," said DeRon Young, 10, "and I say I want to be another Dr. Martin Luther King." The audience of almost 400 people at Anne Arundel Community College whooped, jumped to their feet and applauded. The boy was one of a dozen speakers and performers who participated in a two-hour celebration of the lives of the first couple of the civil rights movement.
FEATURES
By FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | January 18, 1999
On Independence Day, families watch fireworks. Thanksgiving's devoted to turkey and football.But what to do on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday, an American holiday so new that there aren't widespread traditions?King led the movement for civil rights for African-Americans and equality for all. So his family wants the holiday to be more than a day off. They want it to be a national day of service on which people do hands-on things to help others."People working together and getting to know each other, that's improving the quality of relationships among people," says Coretta Scott King, 71, King's widow.
NEWS
March 30, 1998
The stories of the Evers, King and Shabazz families ar entwined with the decades-long struggle to integrate American society. Over the next two days, the landmark events of those years will be chronicled.1975Jan. 24: The Washington Post reports that the FBI wiretapped Dr. King's phones during the 1964 Democratic National Convention.Feb. 28: A U.S. District Court judge in Memphis denies Ray's motion to withdraw his guilty plea.Oct. 23: Martin Luther King III turns 18.1976Nov. 16: Attallah Shabazz turns 18.1978Jan.
NEWS
February 5, 2006
MARYLAND Water supplies under threat Maryland's growing population is straining water-supply networks, experts say, and making them increasingly vulnerable to drought. Unless steps are taken to find new sources, conserve the supply and manage growth, they warn, shortages and restrictions could become chronic. pg 1a Proposal targets group homes State officials and legislators are moving to tighten oversight of privately run group homes caring for 2,700 troubled foster children in Maryland.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2011
The creation of a memorial garden to honor Coretta Scott King will ensure "that generations are going to know this incredible woman," King's daughter told a crowd of hundreds Thursday. "The extraordinary thing about Coretta Scott King was that before she met Martin Luther King Jr., she was already on a mission to change the face of America," Bernice A. King told those assembled in Edgewater for the unveiling of the memorial. Her mother, who died in 2006 at the age of 84, had been an activist before marrying the civil rights leader and became his greatest fan, greatest adviser and greatest supporter, she said.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2011
After retiring recently as a teacher's assistant for the Anne Arundel County schools system, Idamae Sims says she's far from wealthy. But when she learned about plans to create a memorial honoring human rights activist Coretta Scott King, she donated $1,000. "I felt that I had to do it," Sims, 72, said Sunday. "I was born in 1938. I lived through the civil rights era. Dr. [Martin Luther] King and his wife did a lot. I felt I should give back. " Sims is one of dozens of Marylanders who gathered Sunday in Edgewater to attend a groundbreaking ceremony for the Coretta Scott King Memorial Gardens, a $200,000 "living memorial" to the activist, who died on January 31, 2006.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | April 5, 2007
An elderly Maryland woman who grew up in the same neighborhood as the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. wants to sell 25 of the civil rights leader's writings through an Atlanta auction house, an action that King's heirs say they will fight. The woman does not want to be identified, said Paul Brown, owner of Gallery 63, a consignment arm of the auction house Red Baron. Reached on a cruise ship yesterday in the Caribbean, Brown said the auction is set for April 15. The news was first reported in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Tuesday.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun staff | September 3, 2006
When a coalition of Atlanta business leaders and philanthropists pledged to purchase 7,000 pages of the private papers of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in June for $32 million, its efforts were hailed by many as a step toward preserving an important chapter of American - and Atlanta - history. The collection, which was headed for the auction block at Sotheby's, serves as a virtual timeline - for the civil rights movement, the turbulent 1960s and King's personal life. The agreement, which lets Morehouse College house the documents in a library it shares with three other schools, spared the papers from possible purchase by a private collector.
NEWS
April 5, 2006
The Maryland Memorial Tribute to Mrs. Coretta Scott King and Dr. Martin Lu ther King Jr. combined speeches, music, poetry, film and prayer in an event Sun day at Anne Arundel Community College. The event, which also marked the 38th anniversary of the Rev. King's assassination, helped raise $5,000 toward a memorial to the couple planned on the college's Arnold campus.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | April 3, 2006
On an occasion of remembrance for the civil rights struggles of the late Coretta Scott King and of her slain husband, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., one of the most stirring tributes came from the smallest speaker to address the crowd. "I stand here before you," said DeRon Young, 10, "and I say I want to be another Dr. Martin Luther King." The audience of almost 400 people at Anne Arundel Community College whooped, jumped to their feet and applauded. The boy was one of a dozen speakers and performers who participated in a two-hour celebration of the lives of the first couple of the civil rights movement.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | February 14, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Conservatives pride themselves, accurately or not, on grounding their arguments in fact, not emotion. Yet some comments at Coretta Scott King's nationally televised funeral that were critical of President Bush, as he and first lady Laura Bush sat silently at center stage, made some of our country's most prominent right-of-center voices turn passionate to the point of silliness. Rush Limbaugh called the Democratic Party "funeral crashers" at the services. With breathtaking clairvoyance, he opined during an appearance on the Fox News Channel, "I think Coretta Scott King and Martin Luther King Jr., if there was to be any anger from above looking down at that, it would be from them."
NEWS
February 2, 2006
It takes a formidable personality to remain in the spotlight nearly 40 years after the death of her internationally prominent husband. But Coretta Scott King, who died this week at 78, was considered the first lady of the civil rights movement not only because she was married to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., but because she was a fierce fighter for social justice causes on her own. She knew injustice firsthand as a child growing up in rural Alabama where...
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | February 14, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Conservatives pride themselves, accurately or not, on grounding their arguments in fact, not emotion. Yet some comments at Coretta Scott King's nationally televised funeral that were critical of President Bush, as he and first lady Laura Bush sat silently at center stage, made some of our country's most prominent right-of-center voices turn passionate to the point of silliness. Rush Limbaugh called the Democratic Party "funeral crashers" at the services. With breathtaking clairvoyance, he opined during an appearance on the Fox News Channel, "I think Coretta Scott King and Martin Luther King Jr., if there was to be any anger from above looking down at that, it would be from them."
NEWS
By SHAILA DEWAN AND ELISABETH BUMILLER and SHAILA DEWAN AND ELISABETH BUMILLER,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 8, 2006
LITHONIA, Ga. -- Coretta Scott King was laid to rest yesterday, after a funeral where white-gloved ushers welcomed 15,000 people, including four presidents, three governors, three planeloads of Congress members, celebrities, gospel stars and figures of the civil rights movement. The six-hour service, held in the vast two-tiered sanctuary of the New Birth Missionary Baptist Church in suburban Atlanta, was marked by elegiac moments, standing ovations, and, with the Clintons and Bushes sharing a podium, some overt political gibes about the war in Iraq and the Bush administration's response to Hurricane Katrina.
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