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Core Curriculum

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NEWS
July 26, 2013
Those fortunate enough to have met Lillian Lowery, Maryland's state superintendent of schools, know first-hand how brilliant, dedicated, realistic and effective an educational leader she is in preparing a wide range of students for school and life ( "Officials call for MSA moratorium," July 25). Furthermore, the Core Curriculum is not taught uniformly across the nation. However, anyone can go online, search each Maryland county for Core Curriculum, and see, for example, some seemingly fifth-grade content now assigned to first-graders.
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NEWS
October 1, 2013
I am concerned by the way the Baltimore County schools are implementing the new Core Curriculum ( "Charges dropped against Maryland parent who spoke against Common Core standards," Sept. 23). Having retired after teaching mathematics in the county for 36 years, I know how the job of putting a new curriculum in place was handled in the past. Curriculum workshops were held in the summer. Teachers, department chairs and subject area supervisors worked to publish a workable guide for teachers.
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NEWS
May 5, 2013
It is premature to attribute gains in kindergarten readiness to basing pre-K on the common core curriculum introduced two years ago ("City's revamped pre-K showing promise," April 27). Contrary to The Sun's report, the rise in readiness scores was not "unprecedented. " Examination of the data available from a recent Baltimore City Public Schools press release shows that the 4 percent gain seen from 2011 to 2012 is part of a general trend of increased readiness in test scores since 2007 for all children entering kindergarten in Baltimore, whether enrolled in common core aligned pre-K or not. In fact, most of the gains in non-common-core-aligned pre-K programs were larger than those seen in common-core pre-K programs.
NEWS
September 18, 2013
The Sun's recent editorial regarding student testing ("Md. should skip the MSA," Sept. 17) offered thought-provoking insight, yielding additional perspective. Citizens are already advised that test scores will flatten next year as they did this year. No Child Left Behind has been underfunded, students may not be taught Maryland School Assessment material but will receive MSA testing, and the Core Curriculum asks teachers to teach critical thinking without specific guidelines as to how to do so. Education majors study lesson planning, not curriculum development and implementation, although their teacher evaluations and their jobs will depend on teaching Core Curriculum well.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,Sun Staff Writer | May 30, 1995
Who discovered America?Those of a certain age can answer the question almost without thinking. We might have learned it in the first or second grade, along with other pertinent facts -- "Pilgrims, 1620," we know, or VTC "Jamestown, first English colony in the New World."But the question about discovering America infuriates historical purists. All three words, they say, are incorrect: A single "who" didn't "discover" anything, and it wasn't America that Columbus didn't discover (as my 1970 edition of Webster's New World Dictionary says he did)
NEWS
September 18, 2013
The Sun's recent editorial regarding student testing ("Md. should skip the MSA," Sept. 17) offered thought-provoking insight, yielding additional perspective. Citizens are already advised that test scores will flatten next year as they did this year. No Child Left Behind has been underfunded, students may not be taught Maryland School Assessment material but will receive MSA testing, and the Core Curriculum asks teachers to teach critical thinking without specific guidelines as to how to do so. Education majors study lesson planning, not curriculum development and implementation, although their teacher evaluations and their jobs will depend on teaching Core Curriculum well.
NEWS
June 1, 2013
Anne Neal's recent commentary about St. Mary's College of Maryland misrepresents our curriculum ("Cautionary campus tale," May 30). Far from "anything goes," our Core Curriculum is anchored in four fundamental skills: critical thinking, information literacy, written expression and oral expression - skills that employers regularly implore us to build in our students. We are well aware that current economic conditions require colleges and universities to prepare our students for a competitive and dynamic work environment.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 14, 2004
American high school students are no better prepared for college than they were 10 years ago, according to a new study by ACT, one of the two big organizations that offer college entrance tests. ACT said that of the 1.2 million students throughout the country who took its tests this year, only 22 percent were ready for college-level work in English, mathematics and science. An additional 19 percent were prepared in two of the three areas and could succeed in the third area "by doing just a little bit more," the study found.
NEWS
June 2, 2013
The recent commentary about St. Mary's College of Maryland, written by Anne Neal, the president of the American Council of Trustees and Alumni, is troubling on a number of levels - not least of which is that it's not really about St. Mary's ("Cautionary campus tale," May 30). Instead, through a combination of outright factual inaccuracies and very selectively chosen information, Ms. Neal seizes upon the college's 100-student enrollment shortfall to hammer home one of the ACTA's core messages: that American colleges and universities are failing students by turning away from an education focused on western civilization and traditional American values.
NEWS
June 6, 2013
I recently read an article from the Baltimore Sun entitled "St. Mary's College: a cautionary tale for America's bloated higher education system" by Annie Neal. I would like to express my distaste for this article and it's obvious misinformation. I am a student of St. Mary's College, Class of 2014, Anthropology major, Lambda Alpha member, financial aid assistant, resident assistant and peer mentor. I would like to inform the newspaper and the author about how unhappy I am with the Baltimore Sun for publishing these blatant lies about an institution that I hold dear to my heart.
NEWS
July 26, 2013
Those fortunate enough to have met Lillian Lowery, Maryland's state superintendent of schools, know first-hand how brilliant, dedicated, realistic and effective an educational leader she is in preparing a wide range of students for school and life ( "Officials call for MSA moratorium," July 25). Furthermore, the Core Curriculum is not taught uniformly across the nation. However, anyone can go online, search each Maryland county for Core Curriculum, and see, for example, some seemingly fifth-grade content now assigned to first-graders.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
Maryland schools Superintendent Lillian Lowery, a self-described optimist, had hoped students would excel on this year's state assessments because they were being taught under a more rigorous curriculum. Instead, test scores plunged. Lowery now says the new curriculum actually led to the decline, as tests weren't updated to match what students were learning. The poor showing on the Maryland School Assessment spurred calls this week for a moratorium on testing, and led to questions about student preparedness and whether the new curriculum was being made a scapegoat.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
Opponents of national standardization and centralized control of education could quibble with the analysis of Kalman R. Hettleman, a former member of the Baltimore School Board ("The brewing battle over the Common Core," July 14). However, it was refreshing to read the take of one "ardent fan of national standards and tests" who recognizes (1) the existence of a bipartisan, conservative-liberal coalition opposing the Common Core juggernaut, and (2) the reasonableness of at least slowing down the train to let classrooms adjust before authorities start holding students and teachers accountable for scores from the online testing.
NEWS
June 7, 2013
Anne D. Neal apparently thinks that because St. Mary's College of Maryland has been unable to fill 150 seats in its incoming freshman class, its curriculum must be flawed and its students ill-educated ("Cautionary campus tale," May 30). As a student of St. Mary's College of Maryland, I strongly disagree with Ms. Neal's stance, and I am appalled by the complete lack of basis on which she constructs her argument. In her commentary, Ms. Neal pulls her evidence of St. Mary's apparent failure in curriculum from the "American Council of Trustees and Alumni's 'What Will They Learn?
NEWS
June 6, 2013
I recently read an article from the Baltimore Sun entitled "St. Mary's College: a cautionary tale for America's bloated higher education system" by Annie Neal. I would like to express my distaste for this article and it's obvious misinformation. I am a student of St. Mary's College, Class of 2014, Anthropology major, Lambda Alpha member, financial aid assistant, resident assistant and peer mentor. I would like to inform the newspaper and the author about how unhappy I am with the Baltimore Sun for publishing these blatant lies about an institution that I hold dear to my heart.
NEWS
June 6, 2013
This letter is in response to Anne Neal's recent commentary, "Cautionary campus tale," (May 30). As a 2008 St. Mary's alumna, I, like many of my fellow alumni, took great umbrage to the broad strokes Ms. Neal attempts to use in painting our alma mater as a poster child of that "bloated wastrel" which according to her is higher education. Like many of today's social and political commentators, Ms. Neal takes two facts - St. Mary's lower than anticipated incoming freshman class and the college's comparatively high in-state tuition - to draw her dubious, agenda-ridden conclusions.
NEWS
June 6, 2013
This letter is in response to Anne Neal's recent commentary, "Cautionary campus tale," (May 30). As a 2008 St. Mary's alumna, I, like many of my fellow alumni, took great umbrage to the broad strokes Ms. Neal attempts to use in painting our alma mater as a poster child of that "bloated wastrel" which according to her is higher education. Like many of today's social and political commentators, Ms. Neal takes two facts - St. Mary's lower than anticipated incoming freshman class and the college's comparatively high in-state tuition - to draw her dubious, agenda-ridden conclusions.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Susan Reimer | January 7, 1992
Presidents want stiffer admissions and ongoing eligibility standards, but the Big East Conference wants to make it easier for freshmen to play right away.In the name of fiscal sanity, some smaller Division I members want to play non-scholarship football, a concept generally opposed by larger Division I institutions. In a related issue, the football powers in Division I-A want smaller, private colleges to spend more scholarship money on sports other than basketball.Battle lines are being redrawn for what should be another heated NCAA Convention.
NEWS
June 2, 2013
The recent commentary about St. Mary's College of Maryland, written by Anne Neal, the president of the American Council of Trustees and Alumni, is troubling on a number of levels - not least of which is that it's not really about St. Mary's ("Cautionary campus tale," May 30). Instead, through a combination of outright factual inaccuracies and very selectively chosen information, Ms. Neal seizes upon the college's 100-student enrollment shortfall to hammer home one of the ACTA's core messages: that American colleges and universities are failing students by turning away from an education focused on western civilization and traditional American values.
NEWS
June 1, 2013
Anne Neal's recent commentary about St. Mary's College of Maryland misrepresents our curriculum ("Cautionary campus tale," May 30). Far from "anything goes," our Core Curriculum is anchored in four fundamental skills: critical thinking, information literacy, written expression and oral expression - skills that employers regularly implore us to build in our students. We are well aware that current economic conditions require colleges and universities to prepare our students for a competitive and dynamic work environment.
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