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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Trying to figure out the reasons for Marty Cordova's fade last season brings Orioles manager Mike Hargrove to two conclusions: The outfielder was pressing, a natural reaction to the horrendous team-wide slump that produced 32 losses in the last 36 games, and a painful right foot limited his effectiveness at the plate and in the field. "I'd like to believe most of it was the foot," Hargrove said. "It's more comforting." If that's true, Hargrove should be pretty relaxed this spring.
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By Kevin Cowherd, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2012
Tyler Hughes always liked to go fast. At age 3, he was powering a little go-kart around an asphalt track in a neighbor's backyard on the Eastern Shore. At 5 years old, he was whipping quarter-midget racecars around dirt tracks in Maryland and Delaware. At age 10, he was racing 600cc modified lite dwarf cars around Seaford, Del., picking up seven wins as the youngest rookie driver. Now, the 16-year-old from Cordova in Talbot County has been named NASCAR's 2012 Virginia Rookie of the Year in the Whelen All-American Series, a points championship for local NASCAR-sanctioned racetracks.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2002
Orioles manager Mike Hargrove had to make one small concession yesterday while praising Melvin Mora's versatility and trumpeting his value to the team. "I haven't seen him catch," Hargrove said, "so I'm not sure he can do that." Mora's ability to move around the field like a hot dog wrapper on a windy day made it easy for Hargrove to put him in left field once Marty Cordova went on the disabled list. Expected to be used in a utility role this season, Mora again has become a regular presence in the Orioles' lineup.
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By G. JEFFERSON PRICE III | November 8, 2005
Quibdo, Colombia -- The last time Eleana Cordova saw her husband was nine years ago today. His torso was lying in the dirt near the family's modest dwelling in a farming community called Bojaya near the banks of the Atrato River. Nearby lay his legs, and his arms and his head, which, Mrs. Cordova said, had been severed one at a time by a Colombian paramilitary militiaman. Why? Because her husband hesitated when he was ordered to cut the hair of his 1-year-old son. A tradition exists among her people, she explained, in which a boy's hair is not cut until he reaches a certain age, 1 1/2 or 2. But the paramilitary did not care.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2002
One of the American League's hottest hitters can turn cold as quickly as he turns on a fastball. Marty Cordova will talk about how the Orioles are playing. Just keep the subject off him specifically. Otherwise, his locker comes with a frost warning. It's just not part of his personality to ramble on about himself, even after hitting a three-run homer yesterday in the Orioles' 10-0 win over Kansas City to continue a torrid stretch that's worthy of a few syllables. He also singled, walked and drove in another run, leaving his average at .360 with 15 RBIs.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2003
The Orioles reduced Jason Johnson's start at their minor league complex to one inning Monday because of back spasms, and Marty Cordova was scratched from last night's lineup because of discomfort related to a lower back strain. Cordova was listed as the designated hitter in the original lineup, but he was removed after stopping by manager Mike Hargrove's office around 4 p.m. His back began to tighten after making a long bus ride to Fort Myers, Fla., for a March 24 exhibition game, and he was scratched from the lineup two days later.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2002
The last of the Orioles' personnel decisions didn't involve a third catcher or a long reliever. Unwilling to gamble on a lingering injury, they placed outfielder Marty Cordova on the 15-day disabled list yesterday with a strained right quadriceps muscle and activated Larry Bigbie, who had been included among the final cuts. The roster move is retroactive to Thursday, and Cordova is eligible to return on April 12, when the Orioles begin their first road trip in Chicago. Cordova, who would have started in left field today against the New York Yankees' Roger Clemens, aggravated the injury during Wednesday's exhibition game in Viera, Fla. Melvin Mora will replace him in the lineup.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2003
JUPITER, Fla. - Signed to a minor-league contract one day before pitchers and catchers were scheduled to report to spring training, B.J. Surhoff started in left field yesterday in the Orioles' exhibition opener against the Florida Marlins. Manager Mike Hargrove warned against drawing conclusions based on his first lineup, but it's never too early for a little intrigue. Left field is one of the few unsettled positions on the club. Once projected as the starter, Marty Cordova is expected to receive stiff competition from Surhoff, who would get the majority of at-bats even if Hargrove settled on a platoon because he's a left-handed hitter in a league dominated by right-handed pitching.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2003
Outfielder Marty Cordova won't be included among the roster additions next month, but not because the Orioles don't have room for him. Cordova will undergo ligament-reconstruction surgery on his right elbow Wednesday in Los Angeles. Dr. Lewis Yocum will handle the procedure before Cordova begins a rehabilitation program at his Las Vegas home. In the second year of a three-year, $9.1 million contract signed in December 2001, Cordova appeared in only nine games before having surgery April 24 at Bayview Medical Center to remove bone chips from the elbow.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2004
A few years ago, Orioles pitcher Matt Riley would have bristled at the club's decision to take him out of the rotation, even on a temporary basis. Humility wasn't one of his strengths. But Riley said he understands why manager Lee Mazzilli put him in the bullpen after Sunday's rainout in Cleveland. And if he stays out of the rotation until May 15, when the club needs a fifth starter, he'll accept his new role without complaint. "This is a team thing. This isn't a Matt Riley thing," he said.
NEWS
February 5, 2005
On February 3, 2005, RUSSELL ROBERT RIPPEL, JR., of Cordova, MD, formerly of Pasadena, beloved husband of Elaine A. Rippel (nee Ritzel), devoted father of Russell Robert Rippel, III, of Greensboro, MD, Robert Raymond Rippel of Fawn Grove, PA, Gregory William Rippel of Cordova and Rebecca Rose Rippel of Fairborn, OH. Also survived by three step-sons, Timothy Francis Singleton and James Thomas Singleton, both of Pasadena, MD, and Stephen Michael Singleton of...
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2004
A magnetic resonance imaging on outfielder Marty Cordova's right elbow has revealed a torn flexor tendon, which most likely ends his career with the Orioles and would require another surgery if he wants to continue playing. Team physician Dr. Charles Silberstein will consult with Dr. Charles Yocum, who examined Cordova last week, but the injury has been identified. Cordova, 34, was shut down at extended spring training because of pain in the elbow area. He was swinging a bat as part of his rehabilitation from ligament-reconstructive surgery last year, but still couldn't play the outfield.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2004
A few years ago, Orioles pitcher Matt Riley would have bristled at the club's decision to take him out of the rotation, even on a temporary basis. Humility wasn't one of his strengths. But Riley said he understands why manager Lee Mazzilli put him in the bullpen after Sunday's rainout in Cleveland. And if he stays out of the rotation until May 15, when the club needs a fifth starter, he'll accept his new role without complaint. "This is a team thing. This isn't a Matt Riley thing," he said.
NEWS
October 1, 2003
Virginia S. White, a retired legal secretary who was active in community organizations, died of heart failure Saturday at Heartfields at Easton, an assisted-living community. She was 86. Born on a farm near Centreville, Virginia Saulsbury moved with her family in early childhood to her grandparents' farm in Cordova. She was a 1934 graduate of Cordova High School and attended Goldey-Beacom College in Wilmington, Del. In the late 1930s, she began her secretarial career in Baltimore, working for Baltimore Coal Co. In 1940, she married James Benjamin White.
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August 24, 2003
9 Games played by Marty Cordova, who'll have elbow surgery this week. $103,333 Money earned by Cordova for each at-bat this season. 12 Consecutive games bullpen allowed runs before three shutout innings Thursday. 2 Homers for Tony Ba tista in nine career at-bats vs. Rays' Jesus Colome. 8 Consecutive losses before Wednesday's victory over the Devil Rays.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2003
Outfielder Marty Cordova won't be included among the roster additions next month, but not because the Orioles don't have room for him. Cordova will undergo ligament-reconstruction surgery on his right elbow Wednesday in Los Angeles. Dr. Lewis Yocum will handle the procedure before Cordova begins a rehabilitation program at his Las Vegas home. In the second year of a three-year, $9.1 million contract signed in December 2001, Cordova appeared in only nine games before having surgery April 24 at Bayview Medical Center to remove bone chips from the elbow.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2002
Surrounded by reporters after last night's postponement, Orioles pitcher Jason Johnson gave a mock assessment of the start that didn't take place. "My arm felt really good," he said, suppressing a grin. "I had a good forkball, which I liked a lot. And my fastball was around 97, 98 mph." And the run support? In Johnson's world, the Orioles crossed the plate 10 times. Maybe it was 12. He'd probably settle for half that amount tonight. Johnson and the other starters have been pushed back one day, with Josh Towers opening the four-game series in Chicago on Friday afternoon rather than facing Tampa Bay tomorrow.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2004
A magnetic resonance imaging on outfielder Marty Cordova's right elbow has revealed a torn flexor tendon, which most likely ends his career with the Orioles and would require another surgery if he wants to continue playing. Team physician Dr. Charles Silberstein will consult with Dr. Charles Yocum, who examined Cordova last week, but the injury has been identified. Cordova, 34, was shut down at extended spring training because of pain in the elbow area. He was swinging a bat as part of his rehabilitation from ligament-reconstructive surgery last year, but still couldn't play the outfield.
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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 21, 2003
ATLANTA - Orioles outfielder Marty Cordova is eligible to leave the 60-day disabled list today, but he's expected to remain inactive while recovering from surgery to remove bone chips from his right elbow. Though much of the discomfort has subsided when he throws, Cordova said, "I'm still feeling it a little bit." Cordova, who was hitting .233 in nine games, continues to swing a bat without pain. But he'll need to show the Orioles he can play the outfield, since David Segui makes most of the starts as the designated hitter.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2003
Orioles outfielder Marty Cordova will undergo surgery to remove bone chips in his right elbow, a procedure that's expected to keep him out for the next six to eight weeks. Cordova was batting .233 with one home run in nine games. His place on the roster was taken by infielder Jose Leon, who started at third base last night after being recalled from Triple-A Ottawa. The Orioles scheduled a CT scan for Cordova yesterday after scratching him from Tuesday's lineup because of elbow stiffness.
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