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NEWS
By Frances Verter | October 20, 2010
The news about the opening of a cord blood bank at Mercy Medical Center is very exciting. I applaud all of those involved who have provided expectant parents in Baltimore with an option for donating cord blood stem cells. But our work is not done, as the important job ahead is continued education on all options for cord blood stem cells. As a scientist — but more importantly, as the mother of a child who passed away after a long search for a stem cell donor — I know the difference this can make for those suffering with life-threatening illnesses.
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NEWS
July 12, 2013
I was pleased to read your coverage of the suffering endured by patients living with sickle cell disease ("As a sufferer, researcher and advocate, Johns Hopkins' Carlton Haywood has been battling the 'orphan disease' sickle cell all his life," July 7). The report noted that sickle cell disease research is tragically underfunded in Maryland. The only known cure for SCD involves adult stem cells, either from a bone marrow or from an umbilical cord blood transplant. Dr. Javier Bolanos Meade, at Johns Hopkins, is doing research to expand the pool of bone marrow donors so that more patients can find a match.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2010
In an effort to battle debilitating illnesses such as sickle cell anemia, Mercy Medical Center announced Monday the state's first public program allowing parents to donate and bank the stem cells from their newborns' umbilical cords. The stem cells are important because they are the same type as those found in bone marrow and can be used in transplants and to treat 90 deadly diseases that affect thousands of Americans each year, including certain types of cancers and blood disorders.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2011
When Ginny Russo goes into labor sometime at the end of May, her first call will be to her doctor. Her second: to the researchers who want to collect her baby's placenta, umbilical cord blood and first dirty diaper. They're part of the same crew that, during the course of her pregnancy, came to Russo's Carroll County home to vacuum (and take what got sucked up with them), collect dust samples and poke their noses inside her cabinets and closets, making note of cleaning supplies, hair products and other chemicals on hand.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2002
Pregnant with her third child, Placida Blackwood first heard about cord blood banks in her obstetrician's waiting room. The pamphlet didn't leave much of an impression. What's the point of paying some company hundreds of dollars to store a little blood from her baby's umbilical cord? "I didn't think I would need it, and I certainly couldn't afford it," says Blackwood, who is 28 and lives in Cockeysville. The next time she heard about cord blood was a few months later, when doctors told her that her oldest son had leukemia.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
I was pleased to read your coverage of the suffering endured by patients living with sickle cell disease ("As a sufferer, researcher and advocate, Johns Hopkins' Carlton Haywood has been battling the 'orphan disease' sickle cell all his life," July 7). The report noted that sickle cell disease research is tragically underfunded in Maryland. The only known cure for SCD involves adult stem cells, either from a bone marrow or from an umbilical cord blood transplant. Dr. Javier Bolanos Meade, at Johns Hopkins, is doing research to expand the pool of bone marrow donors so that more patients can find a match.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Leverage is a vital commodity in Congress, and lawmakers are reluctant to give it up without getting something in return. Thus, it was a bit of a sacrifice as well as a leap of faith for Sen. Tom Harkin to step out of the way and allow enactment last week of legislation that purports to expand the availability to patients of stem cells from umbilical cord blood. The Iowa Democrat had no objection to the measure, which passed almost unanimously before it was signed into law by President Bush.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 25, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. - I have a new toy. It is a Global Positioning System that takes me where I want to go and tells me how to get there. When I unpacked the GPS, I first had to give it the location of my "home base." Now when I enter a destination, it takes me there without any wrong turns. That seems an apt analogy in the debate over stem cell research. Is there a fixed point - home base - in this debate, or are we to be left to our own devices without any knowledge of where to begin or where the path will lead?
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2011
When Ginny Russo goes into labor sometime at the end of May, her first call will be to her doctor. Her second: to the researchers who want to collect her baby's placenta, umbilical cord blood and first dirty diaper. They're part of the same crew that, during the course of her pregnancy, came to Russo's Carroll County home to vacuum (and take what got sucked up with them), collect dust samples and poke their noses inside her cabinets and closets, making note of cleaning supplies, hair products and other chemicals on hand.
FEATURES
By Ronald Rosenberg and Ronald Rosenberg,The Boston Globe | August 9, 1995
The baby's due any day. You've prepared everything at the hospital and at home.You expect in the years ahead to have such keepsakes as a lock of hair, maybe a bronzed booty or two, lots of snapshots and access to the baby's umbilical cord blood.Yes. The umbilical cord.Researchers, physicians and some families are less likely today to throw out such unpleasant items as umbilical cords as they start to view the nutrient-rich blood it contains as a valuable resource to rebuild the immune system in siblings and, potentially, adults.
NEWS
By Frances Verter | October 20, 2010
The news about the opening of a cord blood bank at Mercy Medical Center is very exciting. I applaud all of those involved who have provided expectant parents in Baltimore with an option for donating cord blood stem cells. But our work is not done, as the important job ahead is continued education on all options for cord blood stem cells. As a scientist — but more importantly, as the mother of a child who passed away after a long search for a stem cell donor — I know the difference this can make for those suffering with life-threatening illnesses.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2010
In an effort to battle debilitating illnesses such as sickle cell anemia, Mercy Medical Center announced Monday the state's first public program allowing parents to donate and bank the stem cells from their newborns' umbilical cords. The stem cells are important because they are the same type as those found in bone marrow and can be used in transplants and to treat 90 deadly diseases that affect thousands of Americans each year, including certain types of cancers and blood disorders.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Leverage is a vital commodity in Congress, and lawmakers are reluctant to give it up without getting something in return. Thus, it was a bit of a sacrifice as well as a leap of faith for Sen. Tom Harkin to step out of the way and allow enactment last week of legislation that purports to expand the availability to patients of stem cells from umbilical cord blood. The Iowa Democrat had no objection to the measure, which passed almost unanimously before it was signed into law by President Bush.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 25, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. - I have a new toy. It is a Global Positioning System that takes me where I want to go and tells me how to get there. When I unpacked the GPS, I first had to give it the location of my "home base." Now when I enter a destination, it takes me there without any wrong turns. That seems an apt analogy in the debate over stem cell research. Is there a fixed point - home base - in this debate, or are we to be left to our own devices without any knowledge of where to begin or where the path will lead?
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 1, 2004
Baltimore mother Kate Goldsborough is spending thousands of dollars to store umbilical cord blood she hopes her three sons will never use. Eighteen-year-old Megan Cardy of Germantown knocked her lethal leukemia into remission, thanks to a stranger's cord-blood donation. Both women believe in the life-saving potential of stem cells found in umbilical cord blood - cells prized for their ability to become other cells. Goldsborough, whose family has a history of cancer, set aside her children's cord blood for its future disease-fighting potential.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2002
Pregnant with her third child, Placida Blackwood first heard about cord blood banks in her obstetrician's waiting room. The pamphlet didn't leave much of an impression. What's the point of paying some company hundreds of dollars to store a little blood from her baby's umbilical cord? "I didn't think I would need it, and I certainly couldn't afford it," says Blackwood, who is 28 and lives in Cockeysville. The next time she heard about cord blood was a few months later, when doctors told her that her oldest son had leukemia.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | December 13, 1998
ATLANTA -- Medical history unfolded at Egleston Children's Hospital on Friday at noon with the world's first umbilical cord blood transplant for sickle cell anemia.As a syringe of dark red blood plunged into the intravenous line of Keone Penn, relatives and friends bowed their heads in prayer and talked of miracles, cures and gratitude.They also gently told the center of attention to wake up."Hey, Keone. God's working it out just like we said. Wake up and see your miracle happening," said Beverly Kennedy, a close friend of Leslie Penn, Keone's mother.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 1, 2004
Baltimore mother Kate Goldsborough is spending thousands of dollars to store umbilical cord blood she hopes her three sons will never use. Eighteen-year-old Megan Cardy of Germantown knocked her lethal leukemia into remission, thanks to a stranger's cord-blood donation. Both women believe in the life-saving potential of stem cells found in umbilical cord blood - cells prized for their ability to become other cells. Goldsborough, whose family has a history of cancer, set aside her children's cord blood for its future disease-fighting potential.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | December 13, 1998
ATLANTA -- Medical history unfolded at Egleston Children's Hospital on Friday at noon with the world's first umbilical cord blood transplant for sickle cell anemia.As a syringe of dark red blood plunged into the intravenous line of Keone Penn, relatives and friends bowed their heads in prayer and talked of miracles, cures and gratitude.They also gently told the center of attention to wake up."Hey, Keone. God's working it out just like we said. Wake up and see your miracle happening," said Beverly Kennedy, a close friend of Leslie Penn, Keone's mother.
FEATURES
By Ronald Rosenberg and Ronald Rosenberg,The Boston Globe | August 9, 1995
The baby's due any day. You've prepared everything at the hospital and at home.You expect in the years ahead to have such keepsakes as a lock of hair, maybe a bronzed booty or two, lots of snapshots and access to the baby's umbilical cord blood.Yes. The umbilical cord.Researchers, physicians and some families are less likely today to throw out such unpleasant items as umbilical cords as they start to view the nutrient-rich blood it contains as a valuable resource to rebuild the immune system in siblings and, potentially, adults.
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