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NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | July 1, 2007
Most business owners believe in their products, and Alexa Corcoran is no different. Except that she also lives on the meals made by her Maryland enterprise, Let's Dish!, a meal-assembly store that has nine locations in the region and plans for more. Customers at the store put together their own meals to cook at home. "Since 2004, we have ... created over a million dishes," says Corcoran, 34, who invested in the business with her husband, Rick, and a couple of friends. "It's a concept that came when people were saying they wanted easy and convenient meals but also healthy."
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NEWS
By Jonathan Cohn | February 27, 1998
FLORENCE Corcoran of Louisiana was in the eighth month of a high-risk pregnancy when her obstetrician ordered hospitalization. But, even after another doctor concurred, court papers allege, Ms. Corcoran's managed-care insurance company wouldn't pay for it -- instead it provided 10 hours a day of home care. A few days later, while the at-home nurse was off duty, the fetus went into distress and died.That might sound like a lawsuit waiting to happen. But, when Ms. Corcoran tried to sue the insurance company, arguing that it had sacrificed her well-being for the sake of saving money, a federal appeals court handed down the bad news: Under the provisions of the 1974 Employment Retirement Income Security Act, the federal law that regulates employer-paid health benefits, Ms. Corcoran could not sue for damages based on pain and suffering.
NEWS
By BONITA FORMWALT | May 17, 1995
Please note that even though I do not have the space to be unbelievably witty in my weekly column, I have rented a small space at Giant in the bulk food aisle where I share my insight on the human condition with shoppers who have been reduced to buying plastic bags full of generic gummy bears.*Fifty years after their victory, veterans of World War II will march again when Glen Burnie's annual Memorial Day Parade steps off at 2 p.m. Sunday with a salute to the men and women who fought in the "Big One."
SPORTS
By Marc Bouchard and Marc Bouchard,Contributing Writer | May 17, 1993
SALISBURY -- Washington College coach Terry Corcoran said he knew what it would take for his Shoremen to pull off one of the biggest upsets in the school's long history of lacrosse."
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | October 13, 2005
Painter Sam Gilliam likes to remember his formative years during the early 1960s, shortly after he arrived in Washington from graduate school at the University of Louisville in Kentucky. "The people I hung out with were moving around the art scene trying to figure out how you get to the top," Gilliam recalled of the countless late-night discussions with painters, musicians, dancers and other artists in Washington's cafes and jazz clubs. "We all wanted to know how to be real artists." In 1968, Gilliam hit upon a solution that was as elegant as it was radical: He simply stopped stretching his abstract-expressionist-style canvases on traditional rectangular wooden frames and instead began draping them in loose folds from the wall or ceiling in ways that combined aspects of painting, sculpture and architecture.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | November 30, 1992
As in the past, the Howard County Center for the Arts' regional juried exhibition "Art Maryland 1992" has prominent jurors. The works were chosen by David Levy, director of Washington's Corcoran Gallery, and Samuel Hoi, dean of the Corcoran School of Art.The jurors looked at about 1,000 slides from 378 artists and chose 49 works by 49 artists. In their statements in the show's catalog, Levy doesn't comment on what, if anything in particular, he was looking for, but Hoi does: He sought diversity and mastery of formal techniques.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 12, 1999
By all accounts, Grace Williams should be dead, the victim of a parachute that failed to open properly on her first jump.Somehow, though, she comes through unscathed, and therein lies the central dilemma of "Falling Grace," the Mark Scharf play in production at River Hill High School in Clarksville under the auspices of the Directors' Choice Theater Company and the Baltimore Playwrights Festival.Is the young woman's survival a matter of luck, or has she been delivered miraculously from death by the grace (get it?
NEWS
By BONITA FORMWALT | March 30, 1994
They're everywhere -- trendy silk banners flapping in the breeze.Joyful greetings to all who pass by? Or the pumpkin leaf bags of the '90s?As a woman who still has difficulty remembering to write "1994" on each check, I am in awe of people who manage to change banners to match the holidays.Valentine hearts, shamrocks and Easter Bunnys are nice, but I would like to see the banners used for a more practical purpose, as a warning. For example:* A scale superimposed on a refrigerator. Beware of dieter.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1997
Kathie Corcoran gets the strangest looks when she gives her address as "McDonogh School."Jonathan Oleisky gets the same reaction when he tells people he lives at Garrison Forest School -- an all-girls boarding school.When Sue Ann Ness has visitors, "they are amazed that I can walk up to Carter House for breakfast" before going to her nearby classroom at St. Timothy's School. She also goes to the school dining hall for dinner with her family most nights.Corcoran, Oleisky and Ness are among about 200 individuals and families who call six area private schools their home.
NEWS
April 9, 2006
On April 6, 2006, HELEN SRAMEKHUDERT, 86, of Richmond, formerly of Baltimore, MD. She was the widow of J. Anthony Hudert Sr. to whom she was married for 53 years until his death in 1992. She is survived by 11 children, Joseph A. Hudert Jr., Regina H. Corcoran (Dick), Sr. Claire "Elaine" Hudert, O.S.B., Carl A. Hudert (Rebecca), Anthony W. Hudert (Cynthia), Elizabeth A. Lord Watkins (Tom), Marianne D. Coulter (Rob), Linda D. H. Spach-Korepta, Cathleen M. Shutt (Mike), Christopher A. Hudert (Peggy)
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