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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1995
Neon educational panels near the Atlantic coral reef exhibit explain to visitors how reefs are formed -- and how they are being destroyed.Aquarium officials hope that the knowledge will transform curious visitors into concerned visitors -- who will then participate in something called Project ReefAction.The project, which has research, educational and fund-raising components, is part of the aquarium's efforts to extend the parameters of its mission beyond merely delighting and educating the public.
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Tim Wheeler | June 8, 2012
Happy World Oceans Day - sort of.  Today marks the annual observance of the vast water bodies that cover nearly three-quarters of Earth's surface.  It's a time for taking stock. Oceans regulate our climate (El Nino and La Nina, anyone?) and feed us, among other things. But 90 percent of the big predator fish that once roamed the seas are gone, according to biologists, and 20 percent of the coral reefs are similarly depleted.  Yet less than 2 percent of the oceans are formally protected.
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FEATURES
September 23, 1999
What are corals and coral reefs?Corals are animals, and their skeletons create reefs. The corals have microscopic, single-celled plants living in their tissues. The plant cells, or algae, give the coral extra nutritious compounds. The algae's energy prompts the coral to secrete a calcium carbonate skeleton. When many living and dead skeletons fuse over time, a coral reef is formed. Reefs are the largest structures made by living organisms.What's wrong with the reefs?Mostly, humans are what's wrong.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 9, 2008
Carole Clay Shewbridge, a speech pathologist and early-childhood educator, died of ovarian cancer Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Monkton resident was 60. Born in Baltimore and raised in Towson, she was a 1965 Towson High School graduate. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at St. Mary's College and had a master's in speech pathology from Loyola College.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | September 18, 1992
Petstuff Inc., a pet "superstore" with aspirations of becoming a national chain, will let its cat-less, dog-less concept out of the kennel today as it opens its first store in Glen Burnie.The store is the first of three opening in suburban Baltimore in the next two weeks. A Towson store will open Wednesday, and a Catonsville store will open Oct. 1, said Jim Flanegan, president and chief executive of the fledgling firm.While Petstuff is based in Atlanta, Mr. Flanegan said, it will roll out its first stores here because "there are an awful lot of good pet demographics in Baltimore."
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 8, 2012
Happy World Oceans Day - sort of.  Today marks the annual observance of the vast water bodies that cover nearly three-quarters of Earth's surface.  It's a time for taking stock. Oceans regulate our climate (El Nino and La Nina, anyone?) and feed us, among other things. But 90 percent of the big predator fish that once roamed the seas are gone, according to biologists, and 20 percent of the coral reefs are similarly depleted.  Yet less than 2 percent of the oceans are formally protected.
NEWS
By Kenneth R. Weiss and Kenneth R. Weiss,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 4, 2008
COCONUT ISLAND, Oahu -- What was intended as a noble scientific experiment in the 1970s has turned into a modern-day plague for the delicate coral reefs surrounding the University of Hawaii's research station here. A professor scoured the seas for the heartiest, fastest-growing algae to help poor nations develop a seaweed crop for carrageenan - the gelatinous emulsifier used in products ranging from toothpaste and shoe polish to nonfat ice cream. Maxwell Doty succeeded, in one regard.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff | November 26, 2004
Using eerie blue lights and modern formulas for ancient seawater, Justin Ries has re-created the oceans of 120 million years ago in 10 gallon tanks in an East Baltimore lab. The graduate student at the Johns Hopkins University is trying to figure out why prehistoric generations of coral reefs died off for 85 million years -- and then bounced back. The water in Ries' tanks looks no different from what flows out of most faucets, but its appearance is deceiving. That's because Ries has replicated the chemistry of the ancient seas by adjusting the amounts of magnesium and calcium -- two key ingredients for life.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | January 25, 1993
Three county students -- including two from Atholton High School -- have been named semifinalists in the 52nd Westinghouse Science Talent Search.Atholton students Bryan Townsend and Lee Epstein, and Centennial student Mark Lewis are awaiting word on whether they have won any of 40 scholarships, worth more than $205,000, in the country's oldest nationwide high school science competition. Top prize is a $40,000 scholarship. The announcement of the 40 finalists is expected today.This year, 300 high school students were named semifinalists out of more than 1,600 who entered science projects.
FEATURES
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 12, 1997
Jean-Michel Cousteau swept into the National Aquarium gala like he was Somebody. He wore a shimmering burgundy jacket and relayed tales of his flight from Fiji in a flowing French accent. Partygoers responded accordingly. They clustered around him and laughed with gusto at his every quip.Indeed, Jean-Michel Cousteau is Somebody -- an environmentalist, developer, writer, filmmaker. But most of all he is the son of a much bigger Somebody: Jacques-Yves Cousteau.The renowned underwater explorer and co-developer of the aqualung, who died this summer, cast a towering shadow in which Jean-Michel spent most of his life.
NEWS
By Kenneth R. Weiss and Kenneth R. Weiss,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 4, 2008
COCONUT ISLAND, Oahu -- What was intended as a noble scientific experiment in the 1970s has turned into a modern-day plague for the delicate coral reefs surrounding the University of Hawaii's research station here. A professor scoured the seas for the heartiest, fastest-growing algae to help poor nations develop a seaweed crop for carrageenan - the gelatinous emulsifier used in products ranging from toothpaste and shoe polish to nonfat ice cream. Maxwell Doty succeeded, in one regard.
TRAVEL
March 11, 2007
KEY LARGO, FLA. 100 GREATEST TRIPS Travel + Leisure Books / $34.95 So many destinations, not enough time. But that doesn't seem to have prevented the editors of Travel + Leisure magazine from assembling a list of what they call the "100 Greatest Trips." Given the sophistication of the magazine, it is not surprising that the suggestions veer on the side of the classy, the urbane and the chic, with an emphasis on the arts. They write about gallery hopping around New York City, a culinary tour of Brittany, France, learning to draw and paint in Florence, Italy, a cinematic pilgrimage to Rome and much more.
NEWS
September 29, 2006
Diabetes Procedure helps some forgo insulin A few diabetics have been able to give up their daily insulin shots after getting transplants of pancreas cells, according to the broadest study of this experimental treatment. But for most patients, the results fell short of the cure researchers have been seeking. Nearly half of the 36 patients who received the cell transplant achieved insulin independence by one year after the treatment. The benefits were mixed for the others, and about three-quarters of the whole group relapsed and needed insulin injections again.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff | November 26, 2004
Using eerie blue lights and modern formulas for ancient seawater, Justin Ries has re-created the oceans of 120 million years ago in 10 gallon tanks in an East Baltimore lab. The graduate student at the Johns Hopkins University is trying to figure out why prehistoric generations of coral reefs died off for 85 million years -- and then bounced back. The water in Ries' tanks looks no different from what flows out of most faucets, but its appearance is deceiving. That's because Ries has replicated the chemistry of the ancient seas by adjusting the amounts of magnesium and calcium -- two key ingredients for life.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2003
Coral reefs across the Caribbean have suffered an 80 percent decline in cover during the past three decades, a far more devastating loss than scientists had expected, according to a study released yesterday. "It's depressing," said marine biologist Isabelle Cote, one of the authors of the study, which appeared in this week's Science. "We all knew that we had a bad situation on our hands. But nobody expected it to be this bad." The researchers gathered information from 65 previous studies of 263 sites and analyzed it to construct a regional picture.
NEWS
March 14, 2000
THE DAZZLING colors of a coral reef are a diver's delight. But that collection of living bony fingers also provides food and shelter for fish and other sea creatures. Reefs offer shoreline protection from the pounding of storms. Increasingly, they are also a source of pharmaceuticals. Yet the world's coral reefs are in increasing danger -- from mercenary collectors, careless boating and fishing and ocean-dumped pollution that kills the tiny creatures that secrete limestone to build these spectacular fragile structures.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 9, 2008
Carole Clay Shewbridge, a speech pathologist and early-childhood educator, died of ovarian cancer Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Monkton resident was 60. Born in Baltimore and raised in Towson, she was a 1965 Towson High School graduate. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at St. Mary's College and had a master's in speech pathology from Loyola College.
NEWS
October 28, 2005
THE OCEAN Warmer waters stressing reefs The extremely warm ocean waters fueling the record hurricane season are severely stressing coral reefs throughout the Caribbean and might kill 80 percent to 90 percent of the structures in some areas, scientists reported this week. These colorful undersea landmarks -- homes for tropical fish -- are turning white, or bleaching, in an area extending from the Florida Keys to Puerto Rico and Panama because warmer than usual water has persisted for months.
FEATURES
September 23, 1999
What are corals and coral reefs?Corals are animals, and their skeletons create reefs. The corals have microscopic, single-celled plants living in their tissues. The plant cells, or algae, give the coral extra nutritious compounds. The algae's energy prompts the coral to secrete a calcium carbonate skeleton. When many living and dead skeletons fuse over time, a coral reef is formed. Reefs are the largest structures made by living organisms.What's wrong with the reefs?Mostly, humans are what's wrong.
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