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December 10, 2004
On December 8, 2004, CORAL RENEE MORELOCK, devoted mother of Michael and Thomas W. Drasal; dear sister of Gloria Ellingsworth and Joseph Bowman; loving grandmother of Alyssa Brown and Jordaynelexi, Cameron, and Thomas W. Drasal, Jr. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Schimunek Funeral Home, Inc., 9705 Belair Road, Perry Hall, MD 21236, on Friday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Services will be held on Saturday at 12 noon. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the National Kidney Foundation of Md., 1107 Kenilworth Dr., suite 202, Baltimore, MD 21204
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
A federal council took a preliminary step Monday toward protecting deep-sea corals off Maryland and the rest of the mid-Atlantic coast. The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council voted unanimously to seek public input on what should be done to prevent commercial fishing gear from damaging the fragile, slow-growing corals, about which until recently little was known. Research cruises over the past few years have documented their presence in several of the many deep canyons cutting into the eastern edge of the continental shelf, about 70 miles off the coast.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Endangered sea corals seized several months ago by federal border agents in Florida are now being used as educational tools in the National Aquarium's new blacktip reef shark exhibit. According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the illegal shipment of 42 pieces of coral was seized at the Port of Tampa for violating the Endangered Species Act, after inspectors determined the coral had been cut illegally from a reef off the coast of the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific. Corals support some of the most diverse ecosystems in the world, and most are protected under the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species, to which 178 countries are signatories.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Seventy miles off Ocean City , scientists aboard the federal research vessel Henry B. Bigelow are exploring a lush underwater landscape that until recently few would have imagined - colorful corals clinging to the rocky slopes of deep-sea canyons. On this and other research cruises, remotely guided submersible cameras have captured scenes of bubblegum corals, sea whips and more growing in the dark, hundreds to thousands of feet below the Atlantic Ocean's surface. Other smaller patches dot the ocean floor in shallower waters closer to shore.
NEWS
May 5, 2003
On May 2, 2003, CORAL ELDRED JACKSON; beloved husband of the late Elaine Jackson; father of Robert (Penny), Steven and Patricia Jackson; step grandfather of Teresa Drugac. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Family will receive friends on Tuesday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. at BRADLEY-ASHTON-MATTHEWS FUNERAL HOME, INC., 2134 Willow Spring Road (at the corner of Dundalk Avenue), where Prayer Services will be held at 8 P.M. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, contributions in his name may be made to the Capital Campaign Fund at St. George's and St. Matthew's Episcopal Church, 2900 Dunleer Road, Dundalk, MD 21222.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | October 19, 2003
A friend swears by coral calcium that she orders through the mail. She says it cures her aches and pains. What makes coral calcium different from the inexpensive calcium I buy in the grocery story? Coral calcium comes from dead coral from the seabed, while the inexpensive calcium you buy might come from oyster shells or limestone deposits. Some marketers are promoting coral calcium as a cure-all for many chronic and serious conditions. The Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Trade Commission are beginning to clamp down on unsubstantiated claims.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 11, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court ruled unanimously yesterday that the owner of a cargo vessel that runs aground after pulling away from its moorings cannot force others to share the blame, if errors by the vessel's own captain caused the grounding.The justices upheld a lower-court ruling that the captain's mishandling of a drifting vessel, causing its loss, absolves the maker of the gear that failed and set the ship adrift.Yesterday's decision arose from the 1989 loss of the Exxon Houston, a 72,000-ton, 766-foot oil tanker that hit an undersea coral reef off Oahu in Hawaii.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 18, 1994
MIAMI -- Tropical Storm Gordon, which sputtered and staggered over South Florida for a week, left a trail of rubble where showcase reefs once bloomed, researchers have found.Waters off the coast of Florida roiled and rolled beneath the winds of Gordon like a giant blender, with loose coral and other debris smashing into the reefs, grinding delicate coral castles to rocky wreckage.By comparison, Hurricane Andrew just pruned limbs and stems of coral that settled on the bottom and nurtured new growth.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1994
Along a Pacific atoll, frogmen are swimming past kaleidoscopic schools of fish, undulating plants and spiky sea urchins in search of a drab white boulder made of coral. It's a medical find: the ideal material for an artificial eye.In an operating room in Baltimore, Dr. Darab Hormozi is implanting a coral ball into a patient blinded in one eye by a nail. Once six muscles are surgically attached, the fake eye will move in tandem with the real one -- even though it can't see a thing.But the implant won't look real until John J. Kelley Jr., a member of the small fraternity of artisans called ocularists, adds a plastic facade that has all the right aesthetic details -- flecked iris, milky white sclera, even the spidery blood vessels that creep along the margins.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | February 22, 1998
Jane Shahmanesh was in a quandary. The single mom didn't want to miss one of the Caribbean's most famous snorkeling reefs, but she didn't want to spring for an expensive excursion her 7-year-old would hate, either.She took a chance -- that's what vacations are for, after all -- and signed herself and her daughter Allison up for an all-day boat trip to Buck Island National Reef Monument. The mostly underwater national park is six miles off St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands and is famous for its marine gardens.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Endangered sea corals seized several months ago by federal border agents in Florida are now being used as educational tools in the National Aquarium's new blacktip reef shark exhibit. According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the illegal shipment of 42 pieces of coral was seized at the Port of Tampa for violating the Endangered Species Act, after inspectors determined the coral had been cut illegally from a reef off the coast of the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific. Corals support some of the most diverse ecosystems in the world, and most are protected under the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species, to which 178 countries are signatories.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 8, 2012
Happy World Oceans Day - sort of.  Today marks the annual observance of the vast water bodies that cover nearly three-quarters of Earth's surface.  It's a time for taking stock. Oceans regulate our climate (El Nino and La Nina, anyone?) and feed us, among other things. But 90 percent of the big predator fish that once roamed the seas are gone, according to biologists, and 20 percent of the coral reefs are similarly depleted.  Yet less than 2 percent of the oceans are formally protected.
NEWS
By Kenneth R. Weiss and Kenneth R. Weiss,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 4, 2008
COCONUT ISLAND, Oahu -- What was intended as a noble scientific experiment in the 1970s has turned into a modern-day plague for the delicate coral reefs surrounding the University of Hawaii's research station here. A professor scoured the seas for the heartiest, fastest-growing algae to help poor nations develop a seaweed crop for carrageenan - the gelatinous emulsifier used in products ranging from toothpaste and shoe polish to nonfat ice cream. Maxwell Doty succeeded, in one regard.
TRAVEL
March 11, 2007
KEY LARGO, FLA. 100 GREATEST TRIPS Travel + Leisure Books / $34.95 So many destinations, not enough time. But that doesn't seem to have prevented the editors of Travel + Leisure magazine from assembling a list of what they call the "100 Greatest Trips." Given the sophistication of the magazine, it is not surprising that the suggestions veer on the side of the classy, the urbane and the chic, with an emphasis on the arts. They write about gallery hopping around New York City, a culinary tour of Brittany, France, learning to draw and paint in Florence, Italy, a cinematic pilgrimage to Rome and much more.
NEWS
December 10, 2004
On December 8, 2004, CORAL RENEE MORELOCK, devoted mother of Michael and Thomas W. Drasal; dear sister of Gloria Ellingsworth and Joseph Bowman; loving grandmother of Alyssa Brown and Jordaynelexi, Cameron, and Thomas W. Drasal, Jr. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Schimunek Funeral Home, Inc., 9705 Belair Road, Perry Hall, MD 21236, on Friday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Services will be held on Saturday at 12 noon. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the National Kidney Foundation of Md., 1107 Kenilworth Dr., suite 202, Baltimore, MD 21204
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff | November 26, 2004
Using eerie blue lights and modern formulas for ancient seawater, Justin Ries has re-created the oceans of 120 million years ago in 10 gallon tanks in an East Baltimore lab. The graduate student at the Johns Hopkins University is trying to figure out why prehistoric generations of coral reefs died off for 85 million years -- and then bounced back. The water in Ries' tanks looks no different from what flows out of most faucets, but its appearance is deceiving. That's because Ries has replicated the chemistry of the ancient seas by adjusting the amounts of magnesium and calcium -- two key ingredients for life.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Heather Dewar and Tom Horton and Heather Dewar,Sun Staff | September 26, 2000
TOWNSVILLE, Australia -- Diver, champion spearfisherman and underwater filmmaker for 50 years, Ben Cropp has looked long and closely into the crystalline waters surrounding the famed Great Barrier Reef. Four years ago, Cropp filmed a documentary, "The Coral Reefs are Dying," that took him around the world. His conversations are peppered with references to "the viz" -- how far divers can see through coral-studded depths. And the viz, he says -- even in this sparsely populated, remote part of the globe -- is clearly succumbing to increasingly clouded coastal waters.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1995
A new colorful, watery world of sand, coral and 43 kinds of fishes has been created at the National Aquarium. Inch by inch, a team of curators, biologists and designers built a coral reef from concrete, polyurethane and fiberglass. Drop by drop, they filled its tank with 335,000 gallons of salt water. And sea creature by sea creature, they made it come alive.Now French angelfish and grunts, trigger fish and tripletails, jacks and jolthead porgies, lookdowns and spiny lobsters are settling into a new home.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | October 19, 2003
A friend swears by coral calcium that she orders through the mail. She says it cures her aches and pains. What makes coral calcium different from the inexpensive calcium I buy in the grocery story? Coral calcium comes from dead coral from the seabed, while the inexpensive calcium you buy might come from oyster shells or limestone deposits. Some marketers are promoting coral calcium as a cure-all for many chronic and serious conditions. The Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Trade Commission are beginning to clamp down on unsubstantiated claims.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2003
Coral reefs across the Caribbean have suffered an 80 percent decline in cover during the past three decades, a far more devastating loss than scientists had expected, according to a study released yesterday. "It's depressing," said marine biologist Isabelle Cote, one of the authors of the study, which appeared in this week's Science. "We all knew that we had a bad situation on our hands. But nobody expected it to be this bad." The researchers gathered information from 65 previous studies of 263 sites and analyzed it to construct a regional picture.
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