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Copyright Infringement

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NEWS
By JANET STOBART and JANET STOBART,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 8, 2006
LONDON -- A British High Court judge ruled yesterday that similarities between author Dan Brown's best-selling novel, The Da Vinci Code, and an earlier nonfiction work did not constitute copyright infringement. Judge Peter Smith, pronouncing his verdict in the packed courtroom No. 61 in London's Royal Courts of Justice, dismissed the claim that Brown's novel "appropriated the architecture" and central theme of a 1982 work written by the plaintiffs. The three-week trial, which saw Brown take the witness stand, attracted huge publicity and at times became a real-life potboiler followed by readers and writers.
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NEWS
By Caroline Little | May 21, 2014
Every day, city hall reporters at local newspapers distill hours of city council meetings into cogent stories that inform readers about how their elected officials are spending their tax dollars. Sports reporters document the successes of the high school team. Investigative reporters dig through thousands of pages of documents to expose government corruption, waste or ineffectiveness. This journalism plays a vital role in local communities and in our nation's democracy. But it also costs money: Newspapers continue to invest more than $5 billion a year in journalism - far more than any other medium in the United States.
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BUSINESS
By Peter Wayner and Peter Wayner,Special to Baltimoresun.com | July 19, 2004
When music companies began howling about the illicit pleasure of file-swapping networks like Napster Inc., Kazaa, and Gnutella.com, many in the newsletter industry yawned. The publishers of the short, tightly edited missives with need-to-know information for niche markets had been living with the threat of copyright infringement since the invention of the photocopier and the fax machine. But these yawns turned into gapes last October when a Baltimore jury sided with the small, 70-year-old Florida publisher of Lowry's Reports, fining Legg Mason Inc. $19.7 million for copyright infringement.
BUSINESS
By Alison Matas, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
A federal judge last week threw out a Baltimore security guard's copyright infringement case against National Football League Properties, saying there was no evidence the NFL had licensed the use of the Ravens logo he'd designed to a software company. Frederick E. Bouchat has been credited with designing the Ravens' first logo, known as the "Flying B logo," and is awaiting compensation. In this most recent case, Bouchat claimed he wasn't getting credit for the use of the logo in some Madden NFL video games.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | October 31, 2000
Earth in the year 2007, and a renegade San Francisco band's tussle with rock giant U2 get screen time at the Charles Theatre tonight, in a pair of movies from unorthodox filmmaker Craig Baldwin. In addition to actors and/or documentary footage, Baldwin makes extensive use of "found footage" - snippets from civil defense training films, shlocky '50s horror flicks and whatever other pieces of celluloid he can scrounge up. "Spectres of the Spectrum" envisions a 2007 where the government is setting up a "New Electromagnetic Order" that will use the Earth's atmosphere to turn humanity into mindless drones.
NEWS
December 16, 2005
Seeking to stop the illegal distribution of its movies over the Internet, Disney Enterprises filed a copyright infringement lawsuit yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against a Beltsville man who is accused of illegally swapping films online. The suit alleges that Wajahat Saleem downloaded a copy of The Incredibles and used an online media distribution system to make the movie available to others. Efforts to reach Saleem for comment yesterday were unsuccessful. The court filing is part of a broader campaign by the Motion Picture Association of America to fight film piracy and raise awareness about the consequences of illegal file-swapping.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | August 17, 2012
A 35-year-old Charles County man was sentenced Friday to six months in federal prison followed by six months home detention for illegally copying DVD movies and selling the bootlegs for 60 cents apiece at a Washington farmer's market, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced. John M. Harris, of Bryans Road, made hundreds of copies of films - including Kung Fu Panda 2, Pirates of the Caribbean and Bridesmaids - each weekend and peddled them at the Florida Avenue market last summer and fall, investigators said.
SPORTS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 12, 2004
CHICAGO - The Chicago Cubs and owners of rooftop grandstands overlooking Wrigley Field have agreed on a settlement that would require the owners to pay the team millions of dollars annually, officials said yesterday. The 20-year agreement, which could take effect this season, calls for the owners of 11 buildings to give the Cubs 17 percent of their gross revenue, said Alderman Thomas Tunney. With an estimated 1,700 seats on the rooftops, it could cost owners more than $2 million a year.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
A Windsor Mill man, a former NASA employee, has pleaded guilty in Delaware federal court to buying more than a million dollars' worth of pirated software from black-market Chinese vendors who themselves were indicted Wednesday in federal court in Delaware, said the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, or ICE. Cosburn Wedderburn, 38, described as a former NASA employee by federal authorities, recently pleaded guilty to conspiracy to...
NEWS
By Jonathan Kirsch and Jonathan Kirsch,Los Angeles Times | February 4, 2007
The Little Book of Plagiarism By Richard A. Posner Pantheon / 116 pages / $10.95 At 116 pages - and small pages at that - Richard A. Posner's The Little Book of Plagiarism is aptly titled. It's a brief but provocative and illuminating meditation on the current craze for searching out, denouncing and punishing authors who appear to have borrowed the work of others and passed it off as their own. Ever the controversialist, Posner is willing to entertain the idea that plagiarism is hardly the high crime that moralists in the news media and the academy advertise it as, and he makes a good case for the notion that copying is (and always has been)
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | August 17, 2012
A 35-year-old Charles County man was sentenced Friday to six months in federal prison followed by six months home detention for illegally copying DVD movies and selling the bootlegs for 60 cents apiece at a Washington farmer's market, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced. John M. Harris, of Bryans Road, made hundreds of copies of films - including Kung Fu Panda 2, Pirates of the Caribbean and Bridesmaids - each weekend and peddled them at the Florida Avenue market last summer and fall, investigators said.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
The instructor for the application software-making camp at Anne Arundel Community College explained that his pupils' inventions must be at least 50 percent original work, to avoid the possibility of copyright infringement. The two dozen campers went to great lengths to ensure that their apps were unique. Some went a bit further than others. Johnathon Woodall of Airville, Pa., was part of a group that made a game involving a worker who discovers his boss has fired him. The object of the game is for the former employee to break into his ex-supervisor's office and bash him with a chair.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
All Frederick E. Bouchat says he wanted years ago was recognition for his idea for the Ravens team logo. Since the South Baltimore resident first sketched a flying raven clutching a shield with a "B" and faxed it to the Maryland Stadium Authority 16 years ago, he has won a court case crediting him with creating the Baltimore Ravens' first logo. But he has never been compensated. Bouchat's long-running dispute with the Ravens took a new turn last week when he accused the franchise of another copyright infringement, this time because it appears in photos displayed at M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
A Windsor Mill man, a former NASA employee, has pleaded guilty in Delaware federal court to buying more than a million dollars' worth of pirated software from black-market Chinese vendors who themselves were indicted Wednesday in federal court in Delaware, said the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, or ICE. Cosburn Wedderburn, 38, described as a former NASA employee by federal authorities, recently pleaded guilty to conspiracy to...
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | August 1, 2007
A Baltimore nightspot has been sued in federal court for copyright infringement for allegedly performing music compositions without authorization. In a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, members of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, which represents songwriters, composers and music publishers, charge that the Red Maple, a trendy club in Baltimore's Mount Vernon neighborhood, ignored repeated notices to obtain a...
NEWS
By Jonathan Kirsch and Jonathan Kirsch,Los Angeles Times | February 4, 2007
The Little Book of Plagiarism By Richard A. Posner Pantheon / 116 pages / $10.95 At 116 pages - and small pages at that - Richard A. Posner's The Little Book of Plagiarism is aptly titled. It's a brief but provocative and illuminating meditation on the current craze for searching out, denouncing and punishing authors who appear to have borrowed the work of others and passed it off as their own. Ever the controversialist, Posner is willing to entertain the idea that plagiarism is hardly the high crime that moralists in the news media and the academy advertise it as, and he makes a good case for the notion that copying is (and always has been)
BUSINESS
By Joseph Menn and Jon Healey and Joseph Menn and Jon Healey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2003
Two years after music industry lawyers pounded Napster Inc. into submission, the major record companies are pointing fingers at each other over the flourishing of online music piracy. Universal Music Group, EMI Music and a cadre of publishers blame Bertelsmann AG, saying the German media giant abetted copyright infringement by supporting Napster financially in 2000 and 2001. Bertelsmann says its accusers are at least partly responsible because they missed the chance to turn Napster's song-stealing users into paying customers.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | August 1, 2007
A Baltimore nightspot has been sued in federal court for copyright infringement for allegedly performing music compositions without authorization. In a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, members of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, which represents songwriters, composers and music publishers, charge that the Red Maple, a trendy club in Baltimore's Mount Vernon neighborhood, ignored repeated notices to obtain a...
NEWS
By JANET STOBART and JANET STOBART,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 8, 2006
LONDON -- A British High Court judge ruled yesterday that similarities between author Dan Brown's best-selling novel, The Da Vinci Code, and an earlier nonfiction work did not constitute copyright infringement. Judge Peter Smith, pronouncing his verdict in the packed courtroom No. 61 in London's Royal Courts of Justice, dismissed the claim that Brown's novel "appropriated the architecture" and central theme of a 1982 work written by the plaintiffs. The three-week trial, which saw Brown take the witness stand, attracted huge publicity and at times became a real-life potboiler followed by readers and writers.
NEWS
December 16, 2005
Seeking to stop the illegal distribution of its movies over the Internet, Disney Enterprises filed a copyright infringement lawsuit yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against a Beltsville man who is accused of illegally swapping films online. The suit alleges that Wajahat Saleem downloaded a copy of The Incredibles and used an online media distribution system to make the movie available to others. Efforts to reach Saleem for comment yesterday were unsuccessful. The court filing is part of a broader campaign by the Motion Picture Association of America to fight film piracy and raise awareness about the consequences of illegal file-swapping.
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