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By Yvonne Wenger | March 3, 2012
A Suitland man faces up to five years in jail and a $250,000 fine for illegally copying and selling music and movies while he worked as a technician at the National Archives and Records Administration. Timajin Nell, 54, pleaded guilty Friday in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt to criminal copyright infringement and faces sentencing June 8. While Nell worked at the agency's College Park office, he used his government email to sell unauthorized copies of movies, music albums and pre-release movies only available to the public in theaters, according to U.S. attorney's office for Maryland.
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NEWS
By Caroline Little | May 21, 2014
Every day, city hall reporters at local newspapers distill hours of city council meetings into cogent stories that inform readers about how their elected officials are spending their tax dollars. Sports reporters document the successes of the high school team. Investigative reporters dig through thousands of pages of documents to expose government corruption, waste or ineffectiveness. This journalism plays a vital role in local communities and in our nation's democracy. But it also costs money: Newspapers continue to invest more than $5 billion a year in journalism - far more than any other medium in the United States.
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FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | August 1, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- A federal appeals court ruled yesterday that the familiar Oscar statuette that universally symbolizes the Academy Awards is protected by federal copyright laws, striking down an earlier decision that the Oscar had entered the public domain.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
A federal appeals court upheld a decision Tuesday that the NFL and Ravens could use their former "Flying B" logo to depict the team's history, lyrically defending the concept of fair use in copyright law in the process. The logo, which features a winged gold shield with the letter B on it, is the subject of numerous lawsuits filed by Frederick E. Bouchat, who has been credited in court as its original designer. But Bouchat has had less luck turning his legal victories into payouts and has continued to sue. In the latest case he argued that the NFL and Ravens infringed his copyright in historical videos and an exhibit at the M&T Bank Stadium.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | February 17, 1995
In a decision that bolsters Realtors' hard-fought position of denying public access to multiple listing services, a federal judge has ruled that an electronic home-sales listing run by a Montgomery County Realtors association deserves protection under copyright law.The decision in U.S. District Court in Baltimore is expected to help define the degree of creativity needed to maintain exclusive rights in the business of collecting, organizing and sellingelectronic data...
BUSINESS
By Peter Cassidy and Peter Cassidy,Special to The Sun | August 26, 1991
Proposed legislation that would allow federal agencies to copyright some software has sparked a wide-ranging debate over the commercialization of government research.The bill, sponsored by Representative Constance A. Morella, R-Md.-8th, has enraged some software industry representatives. They see it as a perilous precedent that may promote public sector enterprise at the expense of private industry.Supporters of the bill, meanwhile, say copyright law must be revised to commercialize products and devices developed in government laboratories.
BUSINESS
By Neill A. Borowski XTC and Neill A. Borowski XTC,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 8, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- About 25 number crunchers are employed at Wefa Group to dive into the flood of government statistics that the economic forecasting firm must massage for its clients.The company gets the data -- much of it publicly available in raw form -- and runs it through their computers and statistical tests, checking for accuracy and making sure the numbers make sense.Those numbers are blended with other data and then sold to businesses, government agencies and other clients. Some of the firm's products include forecasts, but many include compilations public statistics.
BUSINESS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | March 3, 1991
BEIJING -- The United States is threatening to impose steep tariffs on imports of some Chinese goods if China does not quickly stop the widespread piracy here of U.S.-copyrighted computer software, pharmaceuticals and chemical products.Joseph Massey, an assistant U.S. trade representative, said in Beijing yesterday that he has given Chinese officials an April 15 deadline to show how they will protect such intellectual property rights from unlicensed use.Mr. Massey said the U.S. trade representative's office must decide by the end of April whether to start a formal investigation of China's efforts to protect foreign copyrights, which he characterized as "lax."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | November 25, 2006
BRUSSELS, Belgium -- Google Inc., the world's most-used Internet search engine, reached a settlement with Belgian photographers and journalists yesterday in a copyright dispute over how the company's news service links to newspaper content. The agreement removes two of five groups from a Brussels lawsuit that seeks to prevent Google from linking to Belgian newspaper articles for free. Google spokeswoman Jessica Powell declined to give the terms of the agreements with copyright agencies Sofam, which represents 3,700 photographers, and Scam, which represents journalists.
NEWS
By ALEC MACGILLIS and ALEC MACGILLIS,SUN REPORTER | October 30, 2005
Barring a last-minute development, the coming week will see the resumption of a technological revolution that many authors and publishers are arguing is the biggest threat to their industry since Beaver Cleaver supplanted the Hardy Boys: Google's project to digitize the contents of five major libraries and make it possible to search for the books online. Google announced last year that it was partnering with five libraries - the University of Michigan, Harvard, Stanford, the New York Public and Oxford University - to scan and index their holdings.
BUSINESS
By Alison Matas, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
A federal judge last week threw out a Baltimore security guard's copyright infringement case against National Football League Properties, saying there was no evidence the NFL had licensed the use of the Ravens logo he'd designed to a software company. Frederick E. Bouchat has been credited with designing the Ravens' first logo, known as the "Flying B logo," and is awaiting compensation. In this most recent case, Bouchat claimed he wasn't getting credit for the use of the logo in some Madden NFL video games.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
Federal agents in Baltimore seized 36 commercial websites on Monday as part of an international operation to stop fraudulent online sales this holiday season, alleging that the sites have been selling counterfeit goods — including athletic gear bearing the copyrighted logos of pro sports teams. Dubbed "Operation Cyber Monday 3," the international effort involved law enforcement agencies from across the United States and Europe, and seized a total of 101 website domains that allegedly sold counterfeit sports gear, jewelry, shoes, movies and other items copyrighted by brand-name companies.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Gallaudet University is asking the group opposing Maryland's same-sex marriage law to take down a new commercial that features a university staff member who was suspended for signing a referendum petition. The new commercial, funded by the Maryland Marriage Alliance, shows footage of Angela McCaskill, the diversity officer who was removed from her post because she signed a petition to put the same-sex marriage law on the November ballot. "The video they are using, the ad, is actually copyrighted by us," said Katherine Murphy, executive director of communications and public relations at Gallaudet in Washington.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
All Frederick E. Bouchat says he wanted years ago was recognition for his idea for the Ravens team logo. Since the South Baltimore resident first sketched a flying raven clutching a shield with a "B" and faxed it to the Maryland Stadium Authority 16 years ago, he has won a court case crediting him with creating the Baltimore Ravens' first logo. But he has never been compensated. Bouchat's long-running dispute with the Ravens took a new turn last week when he accused the franchise of another copyright infringement, this time because it appears in photos displayed at M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger | March 3, 2012
A Suitland man faces up to five years in jail and a $250,000 fine for illegally copying and selling music and movies while he worked as a technician at the National Archives and Records Administration. Timajin Nell, 54, pleaded guilty Friday in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt to criminal copyright infringement and faces sentencing June 8. While Nell worked at the agency's College Park office, he used his government email to sell unauthorized copies of movies, music albums and pre-release movies only available to the public in theaters, according to U.S. attorney's office for Maryland.
NEWS
By William F. Shughart II | December 21, 2009
O . - Would you spend countless hours developing a novel business method if you knew you couldn't protect it with a patent? Most of us wouldn't. Yet before the U.S. Supreme Court is a case that could have severe consequences for the incentives that fuel such job-creating innovations. While a ruling in Bilski and Warsaw v. Kappos isn't expected until next spring, let's hope the court doesn't fall prey to the arguments of Harvard Law School professor Lawrence Lessig and other supporters of the "open source" movement in computer software.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 2, 1996
Billions of dollars and the commercial future of the Internet are on the line as Clinton administration officials, media and technology executives and consumer advocates meet in Geneva today to discuss a stack of controversial proposals for overhauling copyright law.In the first government-level meeting in decades of the World Intellectual Property Organization, participants hope to update international law for the digital age. Cyberspace is widely seen...
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2003
The Naval Academy has disciplined 85 students who used a military Internet connection to illegally swap copyrighted music and movies, but it stopped short of carrying out its threat to impose the maximum penalties of expulsion or court-martial, an academy document shows. The midshipmen, whose computers were seized in a widely publicized raid on Nov. 21, received sanctions ranging from demerits and extra work assignments to loss of privileges and leave, according to a summary of cases obtained by The Sun and an academy official who spoke on condition of anonymity.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,Sun Reporter | February 19, 2008
A Baltimore man has sued the Ravens for copyright infringement, alleging that the franchise continues to profit from a logo that he designed in 1995. Frederick E. Bouchat, a security guard from South Baltimore, filed suit last week in U.S. District Court. The amateur artist has long claimed that he created and copyrighted the franchise's original logo. He says the Ravens copied the image and gave him no credit. In the lawsuit, he says the Ravens have continued to show the logo in various films featuring clips from the 1996, 1997 and 1998 seasons.
NEWS
December 1, 2007
RICHARD LEIGH, 64 Best-selling author Richard Leigh, a writer of speculative history who unsuccessfully sued for plagiarism over themes in Dan Brown's blockbuster novel The Da Vinci Code, died Nov. 21 in London of complications from a heart condition, his agent said. The U.S.-born Mr. Leigh, who had lived in Britain for three decades, was co-author of Holy Blood, Holy Grail, a work of nonfiction that claimed Jesus Christ fathered a child with Mary Magdalene and that the bloodline continues.
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