Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCopy Protection
IN THE NEWS

Copy Protection

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 2006
Sony Corp. has patented technology that would prevent its PlayStation consoles from playing used, rented or borrowed video games - raising questions about whether the electronics and entertainment giant may attempt to redefine what it means to own something in the digital age. Speculation over Sony's plans for the technology have sparked a furor online as game fans and consumer advocates fret that the company may incorporate it into the PlayStation 3...
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | October 4, 2007
Like a few zillion other customers, I happily log onto Apple's online music store from time to time to exchange a few dollars for a handful of album tracks - sometimes a whole album or two. I don't begrudge Apple a penny of the money I've spent through iTunes. My gripe is with digital rights management (DRM) - the industry's euphemism for copy protection. This is a digital lock that limits the devices on which I can play most iTunes music to a handful of computers and Apple's own iPod portable players.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | May 23, 2002
If you have any felt-tipped markers in your home or office, you'd better think twice about keeping them - they could get you booked on a federal felony rap. It seems that these low-tech writing implements are actually tools that can crack the high-tech copy protection schemes that some music companies have adopted for their CDs. As a result, the possession or sale of felt-tips could violate the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which may not be the...
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | April 5, 2007
When Steve Jobs, Apple's CEO-for-life, shocked the music industry in February by calling for an end to sales of copy-protected music, the cynics smiled. And I was among them. Here was a guy who had made hundreds of millions peddling copy-protected songs and the gadgets that play them. Was this just another case of the master showman blowing smoke to keep critics and regulators at bay? Not this time. Jobs backed up his rhetoric with action this week, announcing a ground-breaking deal with London-based EMI Group, one of the four large conglomerates that dominate the recording industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Gillmor and Dan Gillmor,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 5, 2001
The entertainment industry has been working for years to establish control over digital content to prevent unauthorized copying. The latest effort, a proposed bill by Sen. Ernest "Fritz" Hollings, a South Carolina Democrat, would force makers of interactive digital devices to build copy protection into everything they make. There hasn't been much publicity about the Security Systems Standards and Certification Act (SSSCA), but this is a real piece of work. It's a follow-up to the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which grossly altered the balance between users and owners of copyrighted materials in favor of the owners.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Dawn C. Chmielewski,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 23, 2003
The ailing music industry is poised to make a new push to copy-proof its music CDs, in hopes of slowing the raging epidemic of Internet piracy. Microsoft and Macrovision each announced new copy-protection initiatives at Midem, the record industry's biggest international conference, which ends today in Cannes, France. The new versions of locked-down discs are intended to strike a better balance between the labels' desire to keep their songs off unauthorized file-swapping services like Kazaa and consumers' expectations of flexibility and portability.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | February 8, 2007
Give Steve Jobs credit. Apple's CEO-for-life knows how to make chicken salad from something a lot less palatable than leftover coq au vin. On Tuesday he stunned the music industry by asking recording companies to give up on "digital rights management" technology, which the industry refers to as DRM and the rest of the world knows as copy protection. This is the software that keeps you from transferring music you've bought on iTunes and other online music venues to other folks who didn't pay for it. It prevents you from playing copy-protected music purchased on iTunes on any portable player but an Apple iPod.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | November 10, 2005
Country music fans who play the latest Van Zant CD on their computers are getting more than they bargained for: a secret software installation that modifies their operating system and might open it up to exploitation by hackers. And what happens when they try to get rid of the hidden software? It disables their CD drives. Welcome to the latest battle in the war between the music industry and its customers. In particular, between Sony BMG and its customers - or, if they're smart, former customers.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | October 4, 2007
Like a few zillion other customers, I happily log onto Apple's online music store from time to time to exchange a few dollars for a handful of album tracks - sometimes a whole album or two. I don't begrudge Apple a penny of the money I've spent through iTunes. My gripe is with digital rights management (DRM) - the industry's euphemism for copy protection. This is a digital lock that limits the devices on which I can play most iTunes music to a handful of computers and Apple's own iPod portable players.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | December 26, 2002
IF 2002 WASN'T a great year for the people who create and market technology, it was a banner year for the lawyers who represent them. Courtrooms were packed with people in suits arguing about who has the right to make digital copies of what and whether they should go to jail for doing it. Lobbyists are arguing the same issues before Congress. Often, these cases don't raise much ruckus outside the tech world, but the decisions that arise from them will have a major impact on the way we use technology to work, play and communicate.
FEATURES
By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Michelle Quinn and Dawn C. Chmielewski and Michelle Quinn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 3, 2007
Customers of Apple Inc.'s iTunes store will soon be able to play downloaded songs by the Rolling Stones, Norah Jones and other top-selling artists free of the copying restrictions once imposed by their label. EMI Group, the world's fourth-largest record label, and Apple, the biggest seller of digital music and players, announced a landmark deal yesterday that would remove copying protections from songs starting in May. The decision is likely to pressure other major recording companies to follow suit.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | February 8, 2007
Give Steve Jobs credit. Apple's CEO-for-life knows how to make chicken salad from something a lot less palatable than leftover coq au vin. On Tuesday he stunned the music industry by asking recording companies to give up on "digital rights management" technology, which the industry refers to as DRM and the rest of the world knows as copy protection. This is the software that keeps you from transferring music you've bought on iTunes and other online music venues to other folks who didn't pay for it. It prevents you from playing copy-protected music purchased on iTunes on any portable player but an Apple iPod.
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | November 9, 2006
I have created in my e-mail account (on Yahoo) a group list for the purpose of sending out summary information at various times. I would prefer that each recipient not receive the names and e-mail addresses of the entire group to which the message is sent. How do I do this? - Maggie Bath, yahoo.com This problem of privacy among pals pops up quickly as ever more families, churches, book clubs, political campaigns and other so-called affinity groups discover the power of broadcasting form messages to every member using e-mail.
BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 2006
Sony Corp. has patented technology that would prevent its PlayStation consoles from playing used, rented or borrowed video games - raising questions about whether the electronics and entertainment giant may attempt to redefine what it means to own something in the digital age. Speculation over Sony's plans for the technology have sparked a furor online as game fans and consumer advocates fret that the company may incorporate it into the PlayStation 3...
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | November 10, 2005
Country music fans who play the latest Van Zant CD on their computers are getting more than they bargained for: a secret software installation that modifies their operating system and might open it up to exploitation by hackers. And what happens when they try to get rid of the hidden software? It disables their CD drives. Welcome to the latest battle in the war between the music industry and its customers. In particular, between Sony BMG and its customers - or, if they're smart, former customers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Dawn C. Chmielewski,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 23, 2003
The ailing music industry is poised to make a new push to copy-proof its music CDs, in hopes of slowing the raging epidemic of Internet piracy. Microsoft and Macrovision each announced new copy-protection initiatives at Midem, the record industry's biggest international conference, which ends today in Cannes, France. The new versions of locked-down discs are intended to strike a better balance between the labels' desire to keep their songs off unauthorized file-swapping services like Kazaa and consumers' expectations of flexibility and portability.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | April 5, 2007
When Steve Jobs, Apple's CEO-for-life, shocked the music industry in February by calling for an end to sales of copy-protected music, the cynics smiled. And I was among them. Here was a guy who had made hundreds of millions peddling copy-protected songs and the gadgets that play them. Was this just another case of the master showman blowing smoke to keep critics and regulators at bay? Not this time. Jobs backed up his rhetoric with action this week, announcing a ground-breaking deal with London-based EMI Group, one of the four large conglomerates that dominate the recording industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL HIMOWITZ | February 8, 1999
When you install a new program on your PC, the first thing you're likely to see is a registration screen.This is a form that includes blanks for your name, address, telephone and fax numbers, your e-mail address and a lot of other things the publisher would like to know about you.In return for filling out this form and transmitting the information (usually via phone or the Internet), you get the the benefits of registration, including product update notices, offers and other assorted goodies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | December 26, 2002
IF 2002 WASN'T a great year for the people who create and market technology, it was a banner year for the lawyers who represent them. Courtrooms were packed with people in suits arguing about who has the right to make digital copies of what and whether they should go to jail for doing it. Lobbyists are arguing the same issues before Congress. Often, these cases don't raise much ruckus outside the tech world, but the decisions that arise from them will have a major impact on the way we use technology to work, play and communicate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | May 23, 2002
If you have any felt-tipped markers in your home or office, you'd better think twice about keeping them - they could get you booked on a federal felony rap. It seems that these low-tech writing implements are actually tools that can crack the high-tech copy protection schemes that some music companies have adopted for their CDs. As a result, the possession or sale of felt-tips could violate the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which may not be the...
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.