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NEWS
September 20, 2002
James Gregory, 90, a character actor who played Inspector Luger for eight seasons on the TV show Barney Miller in the 1970s and 1980s, died Monday in Sedona, Ariz. Mr. Gregory appeared in 25 Broadway shows, including a stint as Biff in Death of a Salesman. Among his 30 film credits were the Elvis Presley movie Clambake in 1967 and the 1965 western Sons of Katie Elder with John Wayne and Dean Martin. In 1962, Mr. Gregory played Sen. John Iselin in the acclaimed film The Manchurian Candidate.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2004
Davison D. White, who joined The Sun as a copy boy while in college and became an editor in a career at the newspaper that lasted more than 30 years, died Wednesday at a hospital in Providence, R.I., after being injured while swimming at Nantucket, Mass. He was 66. Mr. White, a longtime Bolton Hill resident, was bodysurfing Sunday at a beach near his summer home when he was struck by a wave. After being rescued from the rough surf by his granddaughter and bystanders, he was flown by Coast Guard helicopter to Rhode Island Hospital.
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SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | November 21, 1990
It isn't just because he once kidnapped a general that you should know about Seymour Smith or because when Wes Unseld went into the Hall of Fame, there was Smith sitting at his table or even because he can read type upside down. No, the reason you should know about Smith is that when he retires today, after working at The Baltimore Sun for 40-plus years, no one will have ever said an unkind word about him. It must be a record.Smith joined The Sun in 1944, at age 16, as a wide-eyed copy boy in the pre-computer, pre-television glory days when city rooms didn't look like insurance offices and when, inside a man's desk, there was as likely to be a bottle of gin as there was a dictionary.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,Perspective Editor | August 1, 2004
One morning last week, I found a note and a gift in my office. The note wished me the best for the future from "one old timer to another." This was because, as of today, for the first time since April 29, 1969, I am not a full-time employee of The Sun. Time will tell whether retirement is a good thing. Right now it looks very good. I still get to write my column, but I don't have to come into the office. I barely got a job here in the first place. When I was hired, Scott G. Sullivan, the city editor, suggested he was doing me a great favor by employing me because I had scored so unremarkably on The Sun's peculiar general knowledge test.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 18, 2003
ARLINGTON, Va. - David Brinkley, who died June 11 at age 82, was the greatest broadcast journalist who ever lived. There are many reasons for that. One is that he had a gift for stating complicated things simply. If there was ever a cliche in his writing (and he wrote all of his own stuff, unlike many in what passes for broadcast journalism today), I never saw it. And I would have seen it, because I was a copy boy at NBC News in Washington in the early '60s and in charge of filing the correspondents' scripts.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2004
Davison D. White, who joined The Sun as a copy boy while in college and became an editor in a career at the newspaper that lasted more than 30 years, died Wednesday at a hospital in Providence, R.I., after being injured while swimming at Nantucket, Mass. He was 66. Mr. White, a longtime Bolton Hill resident, was bodysurfing Sunday at a beach near his summer home when he was struck by a wave. After being rescued from the rough surf by his granddaughter and bystanders, he was flown by Coast Guard helicopter to Rhode Island Hospital.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2001
John Way Jennings, a veteran crime reporter who worked for the Baltimore News American and The Philadelphia Inquirer, died yesterday of a brain tumor at his home in Joppa. He was 61. In a career that spanned 44 years, Mr. Jennings rose from a newsroom copy boy to an accomplished reporter covering the police and fire departments. Mr. Jennings was 16 years old and a junior at City College when he entered the newsroom of the Baltimore News-Post at Lombard and South streets in 1957 and began working as a copy boy. "John was an old-time leg man who covered the police districts and station houses," said retired Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. lawyer Bob Blatchley, a former News American reporter.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1999
As a copy boy at the Sun in the late 1940s, S. L. Harrison was able to observe celebrated Sun editorial cartoonist Edmund Duffy up close. His daily routine included carrying Duffy's finished cartoon to the paper's engraving room.Now an associate professor at the University of Miami (Fla.) School of Communication, the former copy boy has pursued a lifelong study of newspaper cartoonists and written widely on the subject. His most recent book is "The Editorial Art of Edmund Duffy."The 310-page book reproduces more than 250 of Duffy's most memorable and dramatic drawings.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,Perspective Editor | August 1, 2004
One morning last week, I found a note and a gift in my office. The note wished me the best for the future from "one old timer to another." This was because, as of today, for the first time since April 29, 1969, I am not a full-time employee of The Sun. Time will tell whether retirement is a good thing. Right now it looks very good. I still get to write my column, but I don't have to come into the office. I barely got a job here in the first place. When I was hired, Scott G. Sullivan, the city editor, suggested he was doing me a great favor by employing me because I had scored so unremarkably on The Sun's peculiar general knowledge test.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | October 5, 1994
Everything about Gerry Gray is a silent personification of determination. The record is there. He embodies only the finest of athletic and academic abilities, taking a 96 grade average at Calvert Hall to Notre Dame and, upon graduation, being nominated for a Rhodes Scholarship after being a three-year starting fullback.His desire to succeed is ravenous. He is studious and profound. There are no theatrics from Gray, only total commitment. At age 54, with a wife, Carol Anne, and family befitting a man of such exceptional virtues, Gray is fighting to get back on his feet.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 18, 2003
ARLINGTON, Va. - David Brinkley, who died June 11 at age 82, was the greatest broadcast journalist who ever lived. There are many reasons for that. One is that he had a gift for stating complicated things simply. If there was ever a cliche in his writing (and he wrote all of his own stuff, unlike many in what passes for broadcast journalism today), I never saw it. And I would have seen it, because I was a copy boy at NBC News in Washington in the early '60s and in charge of filing the correspondents' scripts.
NEWS
September 20, 2002
James Gregory, 90, a character actor who played Inspector Luger for eight seasons on the TV show Barney Miller in the 1970s and 1980s, died Monday in Sedona, Ariz. Mr. Gregory appeared in 25 Broadway shows, including a stint as Biff in Death of a Salesman. Among his 30 film credits were the Elvis Presley movie Clambake in 1967 and the 1965 western Sons of Katie Elder with John Wayne and Dean Martin. In 1962, Mr. Gregory played Sen. John Iselin in the acclaimed film The Manchurian Candidate.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2001
John Way Jennings, a veteran crime reporter who worked for the Baltimore News American and The Philadelphia Inquirer, died yesterday of a brain tumor at his home in Joppa. He was 61. In a career that spanned 44 years, Mr. Jennings rose from a newsroom copy boy to an accomplished reporter covering the police and fire departments. Mr. Jennings was 16 years old and a junior at City College when he entered the newsroom of the Baltimore News-Post at Lombard and South streets in 1957 and began working as a copy boy. "John was an old-time leg man who covered the police districts and station houses," said retired Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. lawyer Bob Blatchley, a former News American reporter.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2000
Anthony F. Barbieri, who joined The Sun 32 years ago as a copy boy and rose to oversee a staff of more than 100 metropolitan reporters and editors, was promoted yesterday to managing editor, the second-highest position in the newsroom. Barbieri, 52, replaces William K. Marimow, who was named editor of The Sun last month."His experience both as an editor and a reporter really covers the gamut of what the Baltimore Sun stands for," Marimow said of Barbieri. "He has really served with distinction."
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1999
As a copy boy at the Sun in the late 1940s, S. L. Harrison was able to observe celebrated Sun editorial cartoonist Edmund Duffy up close. His daily routine included carrying Duffy's finished cartoon to the paper's engraving room.Now an associate professor at the University of Miami (Fla.) School of Communication, the former copy boy has pursued a lifelong study of newspaper cartoonists and written widely on the subject. His most recent book is "The Editorial Art of Edmund Duffy."The 310-page book reproduces more than 250 of Duffy's most memorable and dramatic drawings.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | October 5, 1994
Everything about Gerry Gray is a silent personification of determination. The record is there. He embodies only the finest of athletic and academic abilities, taking a 96 grade average at Calvert Hall to Notre Dame and, upon graduation, being nominated for a Rhodes Scholarship after being a three-year starting fullback.His desire to succeed is ravenous. He is studious and profound. There are no theatrics from Gray, only total commitment. At age 54, with a wife, Carol Anne, and family befitting a man of such exceptional virtues, Gray is fighting to get back on his feet.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2000
Anthony F. Barbieri, who joined The Sun 32 years ago as a copy boy and rose to oversee a staff of more than 100 metropolitan reporters and editors, was promoted yesterday to managing editor, the second-highest position in the newsroom. Barbieri, 52, replaces William K. Marimow, who was named editor of The Sun last month."His experience both as an editor and a reporter really covers the gamut of what the Baltimore Sun stands for," Marimow said of Barbieri. "He has really served with distinction."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2010
Charles Swann Roberts, an author and co-founder of publishing company Barnard, Roberts and Co. Inc. known for his extensive histories of the Pennsylvania Railroad, died Aug. 20 from complications of emphysema and pneumonia at St. Agnes Hospital. The Halethorpe resident was 80. Mr. Roberts was working in his Willow Avenue office in Halethorpe, which overlooks the former Pennsy mainline (now the Northeast Corridor) when he was stricken, said a daughter, Jean R. Schweitzer of Catonsville.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | November 21, 1990
It isn't just because he once kidnapped a general that you should know about Seymour Smith or because when Wes Unseld went into the Hall of Fame, there was Smith sitting at his table or even because he can read type upside down. No, the reason you should know about Smith is that when he retires today, after working at The Baltimore Sun for 40-plus years, no one will have ever said an unkind word about him. It must be a record.Smith joined The Sun in 1944, at age 16, as a wide-eyed copy boy in the pre-computer, pre-television glory days when city rooms didn't look like insurance offices and when, inside a man's desk, there was as likely to be a bottle of gin as there was a dictionary.
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