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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2012
Gregory Moore, the editor of the Denver Post , is, I believe, a good man grappling with a difficult challenge. The Post , as described in an article at Poynter.org by Steve Myers , is essentially eliminating its copy desk. Eleven are going or gone, a couple have been reassigned to other duties, and the nine survivors become assistant editors assigned to the various newsroom departments. When explanations of these and similar changes are made, there is talk of moving away from "assembly-line editing" and "outmoded nineteenth-century industrial processes" to some bold, modern, fresh, immediate journalism that removes all those unnecessary "touches" between the writer and the reader.
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BUSINESS
By Stephen J. Bisciotti, on behalf of the Baltimore Ravens organization | September 22, 2014
We at the Ravens have promised to be open, candid and transparent with our fans, sponsors, ticket holders, and the general public. This past Friday, ESPN.com's “Outside the Lines” feature ran a story entitled, Rice case: purposeful misdirection by the team, scant investigation by NFL . Later that day, we released this statement: "The ESPN.com 'Outside the Lines' article contains numerous errors, inaccuracies, false assumptions and,...
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
On Monday, as I was working on the word of the week, coruscating , I was called away from the keyboard. Returning, having forgotten that I had not spell-checked the post, and pressed to move on to something else, I published it with two or three typographical errors intact. A little later, I got a message from Chris Dinsmore, a colleague at The Sun , saying that he had noticed the errors and fixed them, bless his heart.* I lead with this prosaic little episode not because it is in any way remarkable, but because it is entirely typical.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2014
The Ravens' top decision makers acknowledged Wednesday that the organization failed in its handling of the Ray Rice investigation and now needs to rebuild trust with its fans. In their first interview since Monday's decision to terminate Rice's contract on the same day a video surfaced of him striking his then-fiancee, Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti, team president Dick Cass and general manager Ozzie Newsome told The Baltimore Sun that the team will be more diligent in investigating legal matters involving their players going forward.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
The linguist Charles Carpenter Fries strove to show how far classroom English diverged from what is actually standard English, both in speech and writing. In The Story of Ain't   (reviewed yesterday) , David Skinner describes how Fries set out to establish this through empirical evidence, a corpus study of three thousand letters written to the U.S. government by ordinary citizens. He developed this analysis in a book, American English Grammar , demonstrating that "the actual difference in underlying grammar between vulgar and standard was, in reality, quite small.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
Writing at Vanity Fair , James Wolcott mourns the passing of the Boston Phoenix , including a memorable appreciation of the copy editor's craft by Al Giordano:  Copy editors were the heart and soul of the  Phoenix  experience, and I've long since thought that separating the two kinds of editing was at the core of the paper's genius. Let me explain: A story editor checks your facts and challenges you on them, and you debate with him or her and fuss over the content and substance of your story.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
Evidently inspired by Abraham Hyatt's ill-considered remarks, reported on Romenesko , about copy editors bringing the operation to a "screeching halt,"* the American Journalism Review has posed a question on Twitter: What do you think? Do copy editors negatively affect news outlets' flows? Of course they can.  So can prima donna writers who imagine that deadlines are for other people.  So can inept assigning editors unable to manage their writers or their copy flow.  So can clueless managers who fail to coordinate the operation efficiently.  News tends not to happen on schedule, problems can crop up at any stage of the process, and anyone is capable of gumming up the works.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and B the site | September 10, 2011
Australian dance-music specialists Cut Copy played to one of the largest FreeFest crowds of the day, making the previous set by Big Sean look like an intimate coffeeshop gig. But the only thing that came to my mind throughout the hour-long set was, "What's the fuss about?" Cut Copy has three acclaimed records under its belt, full of dance-rock that floats above the clouds. But live, the songs felt weightless, like a gust of wind could blow the band off the stage, even with all of its -- literal -- bells and whistles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Playing a prime 9 p.m. slot at Miami's Ultra Music Festival earlier this year, Cut Copy made for an odd stage presence. The electronic and dance music bacchanal attended every March by thousands of ravers and wannabe ravers is dominated by brand-name DJs — Tiesto, Carl Cox. And yet, there was Cut Copy, in matching white suits — one of the few live bands on the three-day bill. It was a fitting move for a band that's always striven to blend rock and dance music, and has mostly succeeded.
NEWS
May 1, 1999
Elsie Salganik, a retired advertising agency copy writer, died Thursday of a lung infection at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was 75 and lived in Northwest Baltimore.Mrs. Salganik wrote ad copy for the old Harry J. Patz and H. W. Buddemeier agencies before her retirement 20 years ago.Born in Baltimore, the former Elsie Flom grew up above the drug store and soda fountain at Baltimore and Wolfe streets owned by her father, pharmacist Carl Flom. A 1938 graduate of Eastern High School, she received her degree in literature from the University of Maryland in 1942.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Modern frontiers in fatuity: Last week at Jim Romenesko's website , we learned that Chris Quinn, the content chief of the Northeast Ohio Media Group, was so incensed about the profusion of typographical errors at Cleveland.com that he announced a zero tolerance policy in a memo.  Some salient passages:  “We hear from people about typos every day. It's a genuine crisis, and it threatens our long-term success. So I'm taking the drastic action of instituting a zero-tolerance policy for typos.” And "Ask a colleague to read your stuff before you post it. Or your spouse.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
Evidently inspired by Abraham Hyatt's ill-considered remarks, reported on Romenesko , about copy editors bringing the operation to a "screeching halt,"* the American Journalism Review has posed a question on Twitter: What do you think? Do copy editors negatively affect news outlets' flows? Of course they can.  So can prima donna writers who imagine that deadlines are for other people.  So can inept assigning editors unable to manage their writers or their copy flow.  So can clueless managers who fail to coordinate the operation efficiently.  News tends not to happen on schedule, problems can crop up at any stage of the process, and anyone is capable of gumming up the works.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
On Wednesday I added my small voice to the chorus taking Abraham Hyatt to task for remarks about copy editing and copy editors quoted on Jim Romenesko's site.  Mr. Hyatt has remonstrated in a comment:  Thanks for calling me a name that your commenting system won't let me repeat. Classy.  I was writing about a process, an editorial process -- which included copy editors -- that failed. You seem to forget that I _wanted_ copy editors. I see the value of them.
NEWS
January 13, 2014
Ava Marie, a meteorologist with WBAL TV News, spoke to a captivated audience of more than 200 on Jan. 9 about her career in forecasting the weather. Held by the Fallston library, children and adults alike were enthralled with Marie's presentation, which included a copy of her first weather report at the age of 7, background on her education and how meteorologists predict the weather. Alisiana Tejada, a sixth-grader, and her mother, Mandee, were thrilled to hear Marie speak and to get to meet her. "My daughter is home-schooled and is interested in the weather.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
Pretty much every day I come across plagued  in copy, sometimes more than once. You begin to listen for the sound of carts rumbling down the street outside and men calling, "Bring out your dead!" It's not enough for a person or organization or program to be troubled  or beset  with difficulties. No, big-time journalism requires the hyperbolic impression that Yersinia pestis  is abroad and the dead are heaped up like cordwood.  Spare me the drama. 
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
My esteemed former colleague Elizabeth Large responded on Facebook a couple of weeks ago to a comment about the joy I presumably get for cheerfully turning dreck into art: "T wo things I know. He's not being cheerful. Also his irritation at drek far outweighs any pleasure he gets from editing it. " Just so. I have been reflecting since on the irritability of the copy editor. Acknowledging that it may merely rise from cussedness, a quality either inborn or developed early in life, I nevertheless think that there a good reasons for it.  The first is that copy editors, whatever the appearance of their desks, esteem order, clarity, and consistency in prose.
BUSINESS
By Michael Gisriel | March 26, 1995
Q: How do I get a copy of the deed to my house? The mortgage on the house has been paid off but the original deed has been lost.Anna Shumway, ArnoldA: Congratulations on being able to pay off the mortgage on your house. Since most mortgages run for 30 years, this is a long-cherished dream of most homeowners. Since Maryland is a "record-notice" state -- your deed must be recorded in the land records of the county in which you live -- the fact that you've lost or misplaced your original deed should be of no consequence.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1990
The original handwritten copy of the Bill of Rights sent by President George Washington to Maryland for ratification disappeared long ago into that great shredder in the sky where all lost documents go -- along with the copies sent Pennsylvania, New York, North Carolina and Georgia.The Maryland copy, presumably signed by Vice President John Adams and other notables, may have been sent back to Congress with the rest of the ratification documents after the General Assembly unanimously approved the document Dec. 19, 1789.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Encountering a previously unremarked usage peeve is always exciting, like the discovery in 1938 that the coelacanth, a fish long thought to be extinct, survives in the oceans. Today at Throw Grammar From the Train , Jan Freeman writes about a "rule" for the use of utilize . The only usage advice about utilize  of which I was previously aware is that it is a prissy variant of use  best avoided. But my estimable colleague Erin Brenner has supplied one that neither Ms. Freeman nor I had ever heard of: that utilize  should only refer to employing an object for a purpose for which it was not intended, to repurpose it. Ms. Freeman comments: " I'd like to know who first came up with the idea that  utilize  means 'use for a different purpose' and, even more, why anyone thought the special connotation was useful.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
I was calm, at first, when I saw that Facebook had locked me out of my account this week. I figured I would just need to change my password, or answer a security question, and the whole thing would be cleared up in a minute. Besides, how important was my Facebook account anyway? Then I read the screen more closely - Facebook wanted me to upload a copy of a government-issued identification, like a driver's license or passport, to prove that I was, in fact, myself. A panicky feeling clenched my chest as I fumbled in my purse.
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