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NEWS
By Phil Kerpen and Dave Schwartz | December 10, 2009
T he global warming debate is at a crossroads, with a skeptical American public already rising up against a cap-and-trade scheme that would send energy prices through the roof, a whistle-blower at the influential Climate Research Unit revealing that the temperature data used to make the case for global warming were badly manipulated, predictions of yet another cold winter, and the fact it has been nearly a decade since global temperatures stopped rising....
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
It all started with a number: 49. Peter Bruun, a Copenhagen, Denmark-born artist who has made Baltimore his home since 1987, created a series of 49 drawings two years ago. "I thought at the time that they were simple sketches," Bruun says. "I then realized that I was 49, soon to turn 50. No one would know looking at those 49 drawings that they addressed life passing, but that's what I saw in them - the dawning awareness that you have a life behind you, and a finite horizon ahead.
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TRAVEL
By Tribune Newspapers | October 4, 2009
Last week, President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama went to Copenhagen to make a pitch for Chicago's 2016 Olympic bid. The capital of Denmark has never been host to an Olympics, but Nordic neighbors Norway and Sweden have welcomed the world's athletes. This cosmopolitan city's appeal extends beyond the sporting type. Here are five things to do: 1 See the Little Mermaid. : If you're expecting to see Denmark's Statue of Liberty, keep in mind that this is a small country. Appropriately, Den Lille Havfrue, as she's known in Danish, is a small statue, slightly less than life-size, that pays homage to the character created by Hans Christian Andersen.
NEWS
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
If the falling leaves, shorter days and the return of traffic jams on the JFX have you pining for those lost, carefree days of summer, we commiserate — especially after we tried to drown our end-of-summer blues in a sunny strawberries-and-creme Frappuccino only to discover it had been replaced with a dead leaf-colored, pumpkin-spiced concoction. But rather than get your Halloween witch-face on prematurely, perhaps it's better to take the make-lemonade approach and begin planning your travels for next summer.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 4, 2004
Atomic physics, quantum mechanics, the uncertainty principle, complementarity. You might expect these subjects to come up at the Johns Hopkins University - but not on stage at a community theater. And yet, what better community theater to tackle Michael Frayn's devilishly complex Tony Award-winning play, Copenhagen, than Theatre Hopkins? A play that tests the mettle even of accomplished professional actors, Copenhagen is receiving an impressively skillful production under Suzanne Pratt's direction.
NEWS
By Juliet Eilperin and The Washington Post | December 26, 2009
- By brokering a climate deal in Copenhagen a week ago, President Barack Obama has committed himself to a more daunting task: pushing for comprehensive climate legislation in the Senate next year. Although many senators, especially key Republicans, have shown little appetite for backing yet another ambitious bill in the aftermath of the polarizing health care debate, it is clear that enacting legislation to cap the U.S. carbon dioxide output and allow polluters to trade emission permits is essential to delivering on the pledges that Obama made to other world leaders.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 21, 2002
Copenhagen, Michael Frayn's 2000 Tony Award-winning play about a mysterious 1941 meeting between Nobel Prize-winning physicists Werner Heisenberg and Niels Bohr, begins a monthlong run at Washington's Kennedy Center Tuesday. Len Cariou stars as the Danish Bohr, opposite Hank Stratton as the German Heisenberg. Mariette Hartley plays Bohr's wife, Margrethe. Michael Blakemore, who won a Tony for his direction, serves as the director here. Show times at the Kennedy Center are 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Sundays, with matinees at 2:30 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, through March 24. Tickets are $20-$68.
NEWS
By Linda Matchan and Linda Matchan,Boston Globe | May 31, 1992
COPENHAGEN, Denmark -- There are no street signs in this neighborhood of Copenhagen, but you don't need one to find the most infamous street in Christiania.You can't miss "Pusher's Street." Enter the so-called "Free City" of Christiania through the brightly painted red-and-yellow arch, and in moments the pushers will be swarming around you like flies."Hashish? Hashish?" they beckon from either side of the dirt street that is notorious throughout Scandinavia. About 20 pushers were out on the street one recent Monday morning, vigorously waving their hard bricks of hashish, which, although technically illegal in Denmark, is plentiful in this community of 1,000.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | September 8, 2006
An impatient "Are we going to have a whole season of this kind of stuff?" to a delighted "I love Michael Frayn!" was overheard at intermission of Copenhagen in the lobby of Colonial Players. I, however, was with the ambivalent majority of theatergoers who attended the production's opening weekend. Even Director Darice Clewell confessed in her program notes that after multiple readings and viewing two different productions, she "was not very interested in seeing Copenhagen again." Only after reviewing the script a fourth time did this work appeal to her. Clewell realized, she wrote, that "Colonial Players' stage provides a fourth dimension - depth, and our oval playing space evokes the classic model of an electron's orbit."
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | December 28, 2009
President Barack Obama's chief science adviser, John Holdren, had this to say at the end of the rough-and-tumble climate talks in Copenhagen this month: "I think we're winning more than we're losing." Really? How? Diplomats had just failed to produce a binding treaty to control global warming in any meaningful way. But maybe Mr. Holdren's right. I attended the climate conference myself, representing Marylanders concerned about sea-level rise and the need for clean energy. And I think - just maybe - we did win more than we lost in Copenhagen.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley will head to Denmark Wednesday night to be a on panel about "progressive governance," one of the governor's favorite topics. O'Malley will be appearing Friday in Copenhagen alongside Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt, the leader of the Dutch and United Kingdom labour parties, leader of the Swedish Social Democratic Party Labour Party and the founder of the Policy Network, which is organizing the event. O'Malley this week has several times referred to himself as a "performance-driven progressive," and in a speech last month to South Carolina Democrat positioned himself as pragmatist.  Maryland Republicans have accused the governor of pursuing a liberal agenda in order to build a resume for a potential presidential run in 2016.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
Blanca Tidemand, who was a member of the Danish Resistance during World War II and helped Jews to escape to safety, died of complications from a fractured neck Feb. 10 at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. She was 92 and lived in Mays Chapel Village. Born Blanca Petersen in Marstal, Denmark, she was the daughter of a sea captain. She completed high school and was a gymnast and piano player. She married Odin Tidemand in 1938 and moved to Copenhagen. After Germany occupied the country during World War II, she and her husband became active in the Danish Resistance.
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | December 28, 2009
President Barack Obama's chief science adviser, John Holdren, had this to say at the end of the rough-and-tumble climate talks in Copenhagen this month: "I think we're winning more than we're losing." Really? How? Diplomats had just failed to produce a binding treaty to control global warming in any meaningful way. But maybe Mr. Holdren's right. I attended the climate conference myself, representing Marylanders concerned about sea-level rise and the need for clean energy. And I think - just maybe - we did win more than we lost in Copenhagen.
NEWS
By Juliet Eilperin and Juliet Eilperin,The Washington Post | December 26, 2009
WASHINGTON - - By brokering a climate deal in Copenhagen a week ago, President Barack Obama has committed himself to a more daunting task: pushing for comprehensive climate legislation in the Senate next year. Although many senators, especially key Republicans, have shown little appetite for backing yet another ambitious bill in the aftermath of the polarizing health care debate, it is clear that enacting legislation to cap the U.S. carbon dioxide output and allow polluters to trade emission permits is essential to delivering on the pledges that Obama made to other world leaders.
NEWS
December 23, 2009
Heaping praise on the "breakthrough" achieved at climate change talks in Copenhagen, as President Barack Obama did last week, may seem an awkward overstatement at best, but it's just as wrong to mischaracterize the United Nations conference as an outright failure. Rather, it achieved modest progress and represents a hopeful step toward the kind of binding global agreement that is alleged to be the goal of all involved. Is anyone shocked that the meeting did not produce an ironclad deal?
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