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NEWS
July 28, 1995
There wasn't a whole lot Leon Day couldn't do on a baseball field. He played a smooth second base and a slick center field. He was a steady .300 hitter. But it was on the mound where he achieved real greatness as a ballplayer.Mr. Day, raised in Southwest Baltimore from the time he was six months old, was a stand-out of the storied Negro Leagues, the ace of the Newark Eagles pitching staff. In a 1942 game at his home town's Bugle Field, he struck out 18 Baltimore Elite Giants, including catcher Roy Campanella three times.
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
The Baseball Hall of Fame reduced the number of years a player can remain on the ballot from 15 years to 10 last weekend. Though no one has come out and said it, the change seemed to target high-profile steroid users and limit their chances to enter the museum in Cooperstown. Unfortunately, it could have the same effect on former Orioles great Mike Mussina. FiveThirtyEight.com's Nate Silver wrote about the rule change on his site Monday , and noted how the shorter ballot terms could keep players who voters might view as Hall of Fame tweeners from reaching the 75 percent vote threshold needed to enter the Hall.
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SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | July 28, 1995
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. -- If your passion for baseball suddenly has turned cold and you're estranged from the game you once loved with deep intensity, then this is the place to be. It's where a reconciliation mends the heart and the soul.The Baseball Hall of Fame has a historical connection to America because, to start with, the man who founded the sport, Gen. Abner Doubleday, fired the first shot for the Union forces at Fort Sumpter, S.C.Heroes of the sport live for perpetuity in its museum and hallowed gallery -- where handsome plaques line the walls as testimonials to their individual exploits.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Other than that sweet swing and the 3,141 hits, the thing that stood out the most about Tony Gwynn was the 1000-watt smile that shined on everyone he met and seemed to be right for every occasion. If Gwynn, who died from cancer Monday at age 54, appeared to be the world's nicest human whenever he showed up on ESPN's SportsCenter or at some local charity event, then there really is truth in advertising because he was the real deal both on the field and off it. Of course, he was one of the greatest all-time hitters and, if you needed a testimonial to that, you could have asked Ted Williams before he died in 2002. He was a big fan of Gwynn's, as was Cal Ripken Jr., whose heartfelt statement Monday simply confirmed what anybody who ever met Gwynn already knew.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | July 28, 2007
Hall of Fame pitcher and Mid-Atlantic Sports Network broadcaster Jim Palmer has always loved returning to Cooperstown to mingle with old pals. Now, he has a new reason to look fondly upon the New York hamlet. He and his longtime girlfriend, Susan Schmidt, were married at 5 p.m. here yesterday in a private ceremony officiated by a Cooperstown judge.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | July 28, 2007
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y.-- --The nation has been parted, and only the cool, the chic and the hip remain in the middle. The geeks, you see, have scattered to either coast. In San Diego, you have more than 100,000 Marvel maniacs and sci-fi outcasts gathered for the world's largest comic book convention. This is a group that routinely dresses up in costumes year-round with no intention of trick-or-treating. And here in Cooperstown, at least 50,000 Gwynn groupies and Cal disciples have descended on a small town for the weekend to trade memories and ogle aging All-Stars.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | February 29, 1992
SARASOTA, Fla. -- Earl Weaver described himself as "thrilled" upon learning he had made the Veterans Committee's short list of candidates for nomination to the Baseball Hall of Fame.The ex-Orioles manager is one of 15 candidates who will be considered in the non-playing category, which also includes those who participated in the old Negro League. A like number of former players are also on the ballot submitted by the screening committee."Some people have asked me about it, but this is the first time I knew anything about it," Weaver said from his home in southern Florida.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | July 29, 2007
No question people are taking this induction ceremony seriously. Yesterday afternoon, exactly 24 hours before the proceedings were to begin, about 3,000 chairs had been placed on the Clark Sports Center lawn. It looked like a pristine version of a Preakness infield party. At 1:30 p.m. yesterday, a group of four guys from Eldersburg arrived in time to stake out their own spot, 15 rows deep on the lawn - about 60 yards or so from center stage. "This is better than we thought it would be," said Mort Shuman, a 37-year-old business analyst.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | July 27, 1995
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. -- What is expected to be the largest crowd in the history of the Baseball Hall of Fame, with estimates approaching 25,000, will include for a first-time visit the most productive hitter the game has ever known . . . except Pete Rose will still be on the outside looking in and won't attempt to crash the party.Rose is persona non grata, considered unacceptable by the lords of baseball, because of allegations he bet on games while managing the Cincinnati Reds and, thus, violated the good citizenship code that is a part of the Hall of Fame eligibility rules.
FEATURES
By Mike Shoup and Mike Shoup,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 3, 1993
Cooperstown, N.Y. -- Contrary to popular belief, and with apologies to the late, great Abner Doubleday, the national pastime did not begin in a cow pasture here. Nor did Mr. Doubleday invent the game.But this small, picturesque lakeside town has become its shrine nevertheless -- the mecca for more than a quarter-million fans each year.Cooperstown, as any baseball fanatic knows, is home to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum -- at once a most likely and unlikely location for a museum dedicated to such a popular and culturally ingrained sport.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
I was overjoyed to learn that no one was nominated for entry into the Baseball Hall of Fame this year ("Voters shut out players," Jan. 10). A few nominees, including Roger Clemens, Sammy Sosa and Barry Bonds, were shunned in their first year of eligibility. I have been patiently awaiting this: We are witnessing the backlash of negativism toward former ball players who allegedly abused steroids. The really lamentable thing is that these men would have likely traipsed into the Hall without the assistance, if you will, of steroid use. Those players who used or abused steroids put themselves above the sport, and that is why I am happy to see these men suffer the consequences and futility of not gaining entry at Cooperstown.
EXPLORE
July 18, 2012
The deadline for submitting sports copy is 9 a.m. on Mondays. We prefer email (howardcountysports@patuxent.com). We do not accept results by phone. When two Howard County teams play, players from both teams (first and last names) must be mentioned in the write-up. Questions? Call 410-332-6578. Baseball Savage Boys and Girls Club The Savage Boys and Girls Club's U-12 Screaming Eagles just returned from a successful trip to Cooperstown, N.Y. where they participated in a week-long tournament that included 104 teams from across the country and Canada.
NEWS
April 25, 2012
Roger Clemens is a selfish, self-serving liar ("'Trapped' in a pack of lies," April 24). How can it be justified that, in the latter years his career, he suddenly had an incredible amount of success? Blind luck? A relentless training regimen, perhaps? Or maybe it was it the vitamin B12, as Clemens stated his injections contained. Who in their proper mind would inject vitamins? This is simply a sad case of a man who is desperately trying to cling to his fading hopes of being inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2011
A pair of Chesapeake Bay Foundation employees left Annapolis Saturday morning on a 1,300-mile journey through the six states in the bay's watershed — by bicycle. John Rodenhausen and Beth McGee will attempt to ride through the 64,000-square-mile watershed, which stretches to Cooperstown, N.Y., and as far west as the Shenandoah Valley, to raise money for the Bay Foundation. They will spend their first night in southern Pennsylvania, pedal to New York and circle back through western Pennsylvania, then to Virginia and return via the Eastern Shore over the next three weeks.
SPORTS
By Tribune Newspapers | July 24, 2011
Roland Hemond never worked for George Steinbrenner, Walter O'Malley or Gussie Busch. He was never given unlimited resources to work with, but made up for it with a limitless imagination. Competing with less became one of his specialties. "Actually, you have to make it fun," Hemond said. "Certainly with Bill Veeck. He'd say, you know, 'We don't have any money, we'll think of something,' and sometimes we'd think of something at 2 in the morning. I'd say to Bill, 'I wonder why we didn't think of it earlier,' but we had fun. " Hemond, who was the Orioles' general manager from 1988 to 1995, was given the Buck O'Neil Lifetime Achievement Award during Saturday's Hall of Fame activities.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
Former Orioles second baseman Roberto Alomar had to spend a year in Hall of Fame purgatory, but his short wait is over and — this time — the vote wasn't close. He was named on 90 percent of the ballots to gain induction into Cooperstown on his second try. Pitcher Bert Blyleven took the long route. He was on the ballot for the 14th time before voting members of the Baseball Writers Association of America pushed him past the 75 percent threshold necessary for admission to Cooperstown.
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | July 30, 1995
Segregation in professional baseball produced two different leagues with two different modes of travel. White major-leaguers usually traveled by train. In the Negro leagues, teams traversed the country by bus, playing as many as 200 games a year.They called it barnstorming, and it was a way of life for Leon Day. A pitcher, outfielder and second baseman, Day grew up in the Mount Winans section of Southwest Baltimore. He died on March 13, six days after becoming the 12th Negro leagues star elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y.Leon Day missed his last bus ride.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | July 31, 1995
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. -- They didn't bring the Liberty Bell with them -- nor did they try to turn the headwaters of the Susquehanna into the Schuylkill -- but Cooperstown, for one day, became Philadelphiatown. And the visitors, maybe upward of 20,000, were on their best behavior, with not a boo among them.Philadelphians have an almost ceremonial tradition of jeering without even the slightest provocation. . . . but not this time. They were wearing their finest Sunday manners.Richie Ashburn and Mike Schmidt, one an artist at hitting singles and the other a producer of power, were being formally received into baseball's most exclusive club, the Hall of Fame, along with three posthumous recipients -- Leon Day, Vic Willis and William Hulbert.
SPORTS
December 9, 2009
Yes, he brought progress Dom Amore, Hartford Courant Once again, the Hall of Fame's veterans committee missed its chance to do the right thing. Marvin Miller fell two votes short. Miller deserves to be in Cooperstown. Yes, he is a polarizing figure, and those who believe a baseball player should have been bound to his team forever if the team so desired will never forgive Miller for bringing baseball into the 20th Century and striking down the reserve clause. No figure has had more impact, brought more change to baseball.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 12, 2009
Hall of Fame announcement 2 p.m. [MLB Network] Find out who makes it to Cooperstown this year. In honor of Rickey Henderson (left), talk about yourself in the third person.
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