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NEWS
January 15, 1993
Cooperative Extension Service to discuss wells, septic 0) systemsAn informational meeting concerning the care and maintenance for well and septic systems is slated for 7 p.m. Jan. 26 at the Taneytown Public Library on Grand Drive.Members of the University of Maryland Cooperative Extension Service Monocacy River Watershed Demonstration Project also will discus general water quality concerns.Interested persons should pre-register by noon Jan. 26.Information: 775-7434.
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NEWS
March 5, 2008
BlackSand CEO to be at luncheon Kellyann Davis, chief executive officer of BlackSand Research, will headline the Business Women's Network of Howard County luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. March 19 at That's Amore restaurant, 10400 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia. The theme of the luncheon is "Competitive Intelligence, the Second Oldest Profession." Davis will explain what competitive intelligence is, as well as how to find and use it. Davis has more than 15 years of experience in market research and holds a patent for developing a system that measures confidence levels for intelligence provided to companies.
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NEWS
April 14, 1991
Robert M. Shirley, Carroll County 4-H extension agent, received a top award from the Maryland Cooperative Extension Service last month.Extension Director Craig Oliver presented Shirley with the "Director's Award for Excellence" from the University of Maryland Cooperative Extension Service.Shirley, 56, of Westminster, has worked in Carroll as a 4-H agentfor 12 years.He is the seventh recipient of the award and the first 4-H agent to win it.Walter C. Bay, acting regional director of the Maryland Cooperative Extension Service and Carroll County Extension Service director, also has received the award.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1997
It ain't pretty out there.Tourists flocking to Maryland's back roads to ooh and ahh at the bold reds, yellows and oranges of fall are having to settle forpatches of ocher, umber and sienna.Too little rain in some spots and too many warm days in others are keeping the lid on the annual celebration."It's kind of an odd year," says Peggy Jamison, economic development specialist for Garrett County. "You see an occasional brilliant red or yellow, but they are few and far between."For people not used to the colors we can generate, these colors seem pretty.
NEWS
May 15, 1992
Gypsy moth caterpillars are now dining on leaves of their favorite trees -- oaks, sweet gum, linden, willow, apple, alder and box elder. Left alone, the caterpillars will continue to grow and eat through June.Healthy trees can be defoliated and recover. But trees stressed by age, drought or disease may die, especially if stripped repeatedly.Commercial tree care companies can spray individual trees. County offices of the Cooperative Extension Service can provide lists of area firms equipped to treat trees more than 60 feet tall.
NEWS
November 24, 1991
Budget cuts mean Carroll residents won't be able to turn to the Cooperative Extension Service office in Westminster with questions about home horticulture.The cuts also mean Extension Service home economist Sharon B. Grobaker, who has worked in the Carroll office for 17 years, will be transferred to the Cockeysville, Baltimore County, office.The changes were announced by state officials Tuesday in Prince George's County and will take effect July 1, said David L. Greene, acting director of the Carroll office.
NEWS
March 5, 2008
BlackSand CEO to be at luncheon Kellyann Davis, chief executive officer of BlackSand Research, will headline the Business Women's Network of Howard County luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. March 19 at That's Amore restaurant, 10400 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia. The theme of the luncheon is "Competitive Intelligence, the Second Oldest Profession." Davis will explain what competitive intelligence is, as well as how to find and use it. Davis has more than 15 years of experience in market research and holds a patent for developing a system that measures confidence levels for intelligence provided to companies.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1996
For 9 1/2 years, Harriett F. Tinker has been answering questions about sickly plants and pesky bugs.But today her job as a horticultural consultant at the Baltimore County Cooperative Extension Service will end. The part-time position -- and with it the home horticultural division of the county extension service -- has been eliminated because of a county budget cut. She was the division's only employee.The office will maintain its 4-H, commercial agriculture and home economics divisions."I don't know what I'm going to do," said Tinker, who has been classified as a temporary state employee with no benefits for all those years.
NEWS
July 1, 1993
Nine people named to development authorityHoward County Executive Charles I. Ecker has announced nine appointments to the Howard County Economic Development Authority, a public and private partnership created to replace the Department of Economic Development.The authority, operating with public and private money, is designed to increase the tax base, add jobs and improve the quality of life in the county.The Department of Economic Development will exist until the appointments are confirmed by the County Council.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1997
It ain't pretty out there.Tourists flocking to Maryland's back roads to ooh and ahh at the bold reds, yellows and oranges of fall are having to settle forpatches of ocher, umber and sienna.Too little rain in some spots and too many warm days in others are keeping the lid on the annual celebration."It's kind of an odd year," says Peggy Jamison, economic development specialist for Garrett County. "You see an occasional brilliant red or yellow, but they are few and far between."For people not used to the colors we can generate, these colors seem pretty.
FEATURES
November 3, 1996
I'd like to start using a lawn service but am concerned about the use of pesticides. I want to be environmentally correct. What advice can you offer?Before contracting with any lawn service, ask for references. Interview representatives from several companies. The company you choose should demonstrate beforehand that it understands and follows the principles of integrated pest management (IPM), which means it will only spray when a particular pest threatens the health and long-term survival of your lawn and cannot be controlled by any other means.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1996
For 9 1/2 years, Harriett F. Tinker has been answering questions about sickly plants and pesky bugs.But today her job as a horticultural consultant at the Baltimore County Cooperative Extension Service will end. The part-time position -- and with it the home horticultural division of the county extension service -- has been eliminated because of a county budget cut. She was the division's only employee.The office will maintain its 4-H, commercial agriculture and home economics divisions."I don't know what I'm going to do," said Tinker, who has been classified as a temporary state employee with no benefits for all those years.
NEWS
July 1, 1993
Nine people named to development authorityHoward County Executive Charles I. Ecker has announced nine appointments to the Howard County Economic Development Authority, a public and private partnership created to replace the Department of Economic Development.The authority, operating with public and private money, is designed to increase the tax base, add jobs and improve the quality of life in the county.The Department of Economic Development will exist until the appointments are confirmed by the County Council.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | June 6, 1993
Greenway Gardens, an arboretum at Morgan Run Natural Environment Area, should be a county tourist attraction and educational center, said a Westminster horticulturist leading a campaign to restore the gardens."
NEWS
January 15, 1993
Cooperative Extension Service to discuss wells, septic 0) systemsAn informational meeting concerning the care and maintenance for well and septic systems is slated for 7 p.m. Jan. 26 at the Taneytown Public Library on Grand Drive.Members of the University of Maryland Cooperative Extension Service Monocacy River Watershed Demonstration Project also will discus general water quality concerns.Interested persons should pre-register by noon Jan. 26.Information: 775-7434.
NEWS
May 15, 1992
Gypsy moth caterpillars are now dining on leaves of their favorite trees -- oaks, sweet gum, linden, willow, apple, alder and box elder. Left alone, the caterpillars will continue to grow and eat through June.Healthy trees can be defoliated and recover. But trees stressed by age, drought or disease may die, especially if stripped repeatedly.Commercial tree care companies can spray individual trees. County offices of the Cooperative Extension Service can provide lists of area firms equipped to treat trees more than 60 feet tall.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | June 6, 1993
Greenway Gardens, an arboretum at Morgan Run Natural Environment Area, should be a county tourist attraction and educational center, said a Westminster horticulturist leading a campaign to restore the gardens."
NEWS
November 24, 1991
Budget cuts mean Carroll residents won't be able to turn to the Cooperative Extension Service office in Westminster with questions about home horticulture.The cuts also mean Extension Service home economist Sharon B. Grobaker, who has worked in the Carroll office for 17 years, will be transferred to the Cockeysville, Baltimore County, office.The changes were announced by state officials Tuesday in Prince George's County and will take effect July 1, said David L. Greene, acting director of the Carroll office.
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