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EXPLORE
July 28, 2011
With heat index values expected to reach more than 105 degrees on Friday, July 29, the Harford County Department of Community Services and the Department of Parks and Recreation are making several senior activity/recreation centers available as cooling stations for Harford County residents in need of relief from the heat. The designated cooling centers will be open Friday, July 29 from 8:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. unless otherwise noted, the county government said in a press release.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
An elderly woman died of heat-related factors in Wicomico County last week, according to state health officials, the fifth death of the summer associated with rising temperatures. The death was included in a weekly report the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene releases during the summer months. Officials do not provide any identifying details about the deaths, other than that the woman was older than age 65. The report covered the week from July 9 through July 15. Earlier heat-related deaths included an elderly man and a young girl, under age 4, in Baltimore County, another elderly woman in Wicomico, and a man aged 45-64 in Howard County.
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NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
The National Weather Service was calling for Wednesday to be mostly sunny in the Baltimore area with a high near 95 degrees and east winds 3 to 6 miles per hour. Heat index values will be as high as 102. There is a chance of isolated showers and thunderstorms after 2 p.m. It will be mostly clear at night, with temperatures dropping to 77 degrees. The city has opened its cooling centers Wednesday through Friday to provide free air conditioning and water for residents. In addition, city residents can seek relief from the heat at any branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library , during normal business hours.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood | July 15, 2013
The National Weather Service says temperatures this week will be in the upper 90s, and the heat index for the region - factoring in those temperatures and also humidity - will make it feel well over 100 degrees. Annapolis will open a cooling center in the Pip Moyer Recreation Center, 273 Hilltop Lane, from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. today on Tuesday, said city spokeswoman Rhonda Wardlaw. The decision on whether to open the center on subsequent days will be made on a day-to-day basis, Wardlaw said.
EXPLORE
July 7, 2012
Because of high temperatures and humidity — and with some people in Carroll still without power from last Friday's storm — the Carroll County Department of Citizen Services operated several cooling centers around the county this past week. As of Saturday evening, July 7, Baltimore Gas and Electric was reporting just 142 customers were without power in Carroll County in the wake of the storm. The company said it had already restored service at 8,198 other outages. Even after the power outages have passed, county officials said that residents who are vulnerable to extreme heat and who do not have air-conditioning in their homes are encouraged to cool off in any of the following locations until the close of business on weekdays.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
The National Weather Service says it will feel like 105 degrees in some areas around Baltimore Tuesday, and several health departments throughout the region issued advisories about a heat wave that's expected to last all week. The weather service said a heat advisory will be in effect from noon to 7 p.m. Tuesday, with temperatures in the upper 90s in and around Baltimore. Factoring for humidity, the temperatures will feel as high as 105. With the high temperatures expected to last all week, jurisdictions are opening cooling centers and urging caution.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes | July 9, 2007
As temperatures soared into the mid-90s yesterday, about 100 people sought refuge from the heat at six cooling centers around Baltimore, authorities said. The centers were opened after the city Health Department issued a Code Red heat alert over the weekend and urged residents to take steps to avoid overheating through tomorrow. Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, Baltimore's health commissioner, said officials hadn't seen people suffering from heat-related problems yesterday, but workers were preparing to help people as long as the heat wave lasted.
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
The National Weather Service was calling for Thursday to be sunny and hot, with a high near 101 degrees and south winds between 5 and 10 miles per hour. Heat index values will be as high as 111. Thursday night was expected to be mostly clear, with a low around 84 and sound winds between 5 and 7 miles per hour. An excessive heat warning was in effect for Thursday from noon to 8 p.m. and Friday from noon to 8 p.m. An excessive heat warning means that a prolonged period of dangerously hot temperatures will occur.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | July 8, 2007
With temperatures expected to rise into the mid-90s, the Baltimore Health Department issued a Code Red heat alert for today through Tuesday, advising city residents to take steps to avoid overheating. City cooling centers, which offer air-conditioning and water for people seeking refuge from the heat, will open at 9 a.m. today. The health department recommends that people drink plenty of water or juice, wipe their skin with cool water, and reduce outside activities. The National Weather Service predicts sunny weather today with a high temperature of 97 degrees.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | August 10, 2009
With some of the highest temperatures of the summer predicted through Tuesday, Baltimore city's health department issued the year's first Code Red Heat Alert and announced Sunday that the city will open emergency cooling centers and provide free bus passes to help residents seek shelter from the heat. Interim Health Commissioner Olivia D. Farrow declared the alert after the National Weather Service forecast a potentially hazardous combination of high temperatures and humidity for the next two days.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
The National Weather Service says it will feel like 105 degrees in some areas around Baltimore Tuesday, and several health departments throughout the region issued advisories about a heat wave that's expected to last all week. The weather service said a heat advisory will be in effect from noon to 7 p.m. Tuesday, with temperatures in the upper 90s in and around Baltimore. Factoring for humidity, the temperatures will feel as high as 105. With the high temperatures expected to last all week, jurisdictions are opening cooling centers and urging caution.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 26, 2012
Temperatures in the 90s returned to Harford County Thursday and were expected through Friday, if not longer, prompting the county to take steps to protect residents. With the heat index expected to reach nearly 105 degrees on Thursday, Harford County government, in cooperation with Harford County Public Library and the Harford County Health Department, once again used local libraries as cooling centers for the public. One incident involving heat exposure was reported on the opening day of the Harford County Farm Fair in Bel Air Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
July 25, 2012
Baltimore City Health Department will open emergency cooling centers Thursday offering free water and cool air. The National Weather Service is calling for a high of 99 and a heat index up to 106 degrees. There's a 30 percent chance of late afternoon rain and thunderstorms. These centers will be open from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.: • Northern Community Action Center -- 5225 York Road • Southern Community Action Center -- 606 Cherry Hill Road (inside the shopping center 2nd floor)
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 17, 2012
Temperatures had reached the lower 90s already by lunchtime Tuesday, but relatively low humidity was keeping the heat index in check in the Baltimore area. A temperature of 95 degrees was recorded at BWI Marshall Airport about noon, but the dew point, a measure of humidity in the air, was 58 degrees. That is on the low side this time of year, and it is keeping the humidity from adding to any perception of heat. During the heat wave earlier this month, dew points topped 70 degrees, bringing the heat index upward of 110 degrees.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 16, 2012
Health officials are bracing for another burst of heat in the Baltimore area, but it won't be as long as the last one. Baltimore City officials declared a "Code Red" heat emergency Monday morning, opening 11 cooling centers across the city. In other counties, those seeking shelter from the heat are encouraged to visit senior centers and public libraries. Eighteen people have died across Maryland so far this month at least in part because of the heat. That was during a 12-day stretch with highs 90 degrees or hotter.
EXPLORE
July 7, 2012
Because of high temperatures and humidity — and with some people in Carroll still without power from last Friday's storm — the Carroll County Department of Citizen Services operated several cooling centers around the county this past week. As of Saturday evening, July 7, Baltimore Gas and Electric was reporting just 142 customers were without power in Carroll County in the wake of the storm. The company said it had already restored service at 8,198 other outages. Even after the power outages have passed, county officials said that residents who are vulnerable to extreme heat and who do not have air-conditioning in their homes are encouraged to cool off in any of the following locations until the close of business on weekdays.
HEALTH
August 5, 2010
BALTIMORE (AP) — Maryland health officials are reporting two more heat-related deaths, bringing the total for the year to 19. Department of Health and Mental Hygiene spokesman David Paulson said Thursday that both deaths occurred early last week. He says the residents of Anne Arundel and Somerset counties both suffered from heart disease and were found in homes without air conditioning. Paulson says hospitals have reported 1,274 heat-related or dehydration visits from July 1 to Tuesday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | June 21, 2012
A heat advisory from the National Weather Service continues into Thursday, lasting through 10 p.m. And the latest forecasts show the heat may not break until the weekend. Temperatures were rising quickly Thursday morning, surpassing the 90-degree mark before 10 a.m. at BWI Marshall Airport. The temperature was 92 with a heat index of 96 as of 10 a.m., three degrees ahead of Wednesday's climb. The high Wednesday was 98 degrees. The chance for one weather record was dashed early Thursday, when BWI hit an overnight low of 75 degrees.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2012
A deadly storm, fueled by extreme heat and humidity, left Maryland in a state of emergency that continued Sunday, with hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses without power, with some residents expected to remain in the dark over the next week. The severity of the Friday-night storm — being blamed for at least two deaths in Maryland and 10 others around the region — caught state authorities off guard, and officials sought help from Southern states to restore power. In the Baltimore region alone, roughly 306,000 remained without power as of 10 a.m. Sunday.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2012
The forecast isn't pretty, with highs predicted in the high 90s, and thousands of people are without power. What's a parent to do to keep cool? Here's a roundup of some places with air conditioning that are open (subject to change, of course, and assuming you can see this on a wireless device before your battery runs out): Howard County Libraries are open normal hours today, according to the Howard County Government Facebook page . (Glenwood is open but has no A/C. UPDATE: Miller Branch is now closed due to power outages.)
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