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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | August 5, 1998
Responses to requests for Frog Eye Salad and stewed tomatoes have been received and tested. You are in for a treat.Frog Eye Salad was the request of Debbie Trimp of Sioux Falls, S.D. She wanted a version of this quick and simple noodle dish that didn't use eggs. Her response came from Trina Herll of Brandon, S.D.Ann Bailey of Pasadena wanted stewed tomatoes, and Mary W. Earl of Baltimore responded with a recipe that she says "came from Ms. Brown's cookbook at the Hilltop House in Harpers Ferry, W. Va. I have made these for the last 40 to 50 years.
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NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2011
Pat Carden from Aberdeen Proving Ground was looking for a recipe for peanut butter pie that she had misplaced. She said the recipe came from her niece more then 40 years ago, and she has had no luck replicating it on her own. Barbara Cook from Forest Hill sent in a recipe for a peanut butter pie that she likes very much. She said this no-bake pie takes her less than five minutes to prepare. I liked it for its simplicity, and I also loved that it had a chocolate cookie crust.
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NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2003
Mary M. Young of Los Banos, Calif., requested a "side-dish recipe made with Jell-O that has ... been cut into small cubes and mixed with Cool Whip and other ingredients." Dana J. Shinholt of Columbia said: "I'm glad to respond with a favorite dish my grandmother served at our family gatherings. Nana would make a large Jell-O mold for the adults to share and individual cups for each of the grandchildren. She has been gone now for almost 15 years, and it took a little bit of searching to track down her recipe book.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | June 18, 2008
Anna Mae Stevens of Middleport, Pa., was looking for a recipe she misplaced for something she called Lemon Lush. It was a no-bake dessert made with lemon pudding and whipped topping in a graham-cracker crust. Janet Machulcz of Westminster sent in a recipe she had for a lemon dessert, and although it does not match the exact description of what Stevens was looking for, it comes pretty close. She says she has made it numerous times, that "it comes together very easily" and it has always been a favorite of her sons-in-law.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2005
Denise Imrise from Burlington, N.J., was trying to find a recipe for what she called Robert Redford Pie. Many readers seemed to know just what she was looking for. The recipe Carolyn Short from Sparks sent in came from her son many years ago. She says it was called "John Wayne Cake" then and today it might be called "Brad Pitt Cake." But whatever you want to call it, most will agree that this is a luscious and rich dessert that is easy to make. This recipe calls for a flour-and-nut crust that was very tasty, but a graham-cracker crust certainly could be substituted if one preferred.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 8, 2004
Karen Hooper and her husband from Newport, Tenn., were looking for a recipe for the Caramel-Pecan Silk Supreme pie that they had enjoyed at the Bakers Square restaurant chain in California. Connie Bethune of Maynardville, Tenn., writes that she has recently moved from California and can "relate to Bakers Square and their delicious pies." She had her own recipe for a pie that she felt was very similar to the one served at the restaurant. In fact, she says, her family cannot tell the difference.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | June 18, 2008
Anna Mae Stevens of Middleport, Pa., was looking for a recipe she misplaced for something she called Lemon Lush. It was a no-bake dessert made with lemon pudding and whipped topping in a graham-cracker crust. Janet Machulcz of Westminster sent in a recipe she had for a lemon dessert, and although it does not match the exact description of what Stevens was looking for, it comes pretty close. She says she has made it numerous times, that "it comes together very easily" and it has always been a favorite of her sons-in-law.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2011
Pat Carden from Aberdeen Proving Ground was looking for a recipe for peanut butter pie that she had misplaced. She said the recipe came from her niece more then 40 years ago, and she has had no luck replicating it on her own. Barbara Cook from Forest Hill sent in a recipe for a peanut butter pie that she likes very much. She said this no-bake pie takes her less than five minutes to prepare. I liked it for its simplicity, and I also loved that it had a chocolate cookie crust.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | May 23, 2007
Quinlan Cummings of Greenville, N.C., was looking for a recipe for a Lemon Chess Pie. Ruth Ann Barker of Fayetteville, N.C., sent in a recipe for the pie from the Farm Journal Complete Pie Cookbook published in 1965. She says this is a recipe she has enjoyed over the years. The recipe notes say that the filling can be baked in a traditional unbaked pie shell or that a graham-cracker or vanilla-wafer crumb crust can be substituted. I tested it in the traditional pastry crust. The finished pie was a beautiful lemon-yellow color inside and nut brown on top; it had a fine balance of tart and sweet.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | July 20, 1994
A death by chocolate and a revival by sweet fried dough offer a promise of pleasure.Johnny Ketchum of Baltimore asked if anyone "had a recipe for fatcakes. All I can remember is that my dad prepared the dough the night before and let it rise. Then he would deep-fry them in lard. They were larger than a doughnut," he wrote.Most recipes received referred to the "fatcakes" as fastnachts, a yeast raised dough that is fried and traditionally served on Shrove Tuesday.B. Hoffheiser of Baltimore responded with her recipe which she notes came from "my Dutch cook book."
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | May 23, 2007
Quinlan Cummings of Greenville, N.C., was looking for a recipe for a Lemon Chess Pie. Ruth Ann Barker of Fayetteville, N.C., sent in a recipe for the pie from the Farm Journal Complete Pie Cookbook published in 1965. She says this is a recipe she has enjoyed over the years. The recipe notes say that the filling can be baked in a traditional unbaked pie shell or that a graham-cracker or vanilla-wafer crumb crust can be substituted. I tested it in the traditional pastry crust. The finished pie was a beautiful lemon-yellow color inside and nut brown on top; it had a fine balance of tart and sweet.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2005
Denise Imrise from Burlington, N.J., was trying to find a recipe for what she called Robert Redford Pie. Many readers seemed to know just what she was looking for. The recipe Carolyn Short from Sparks sent in came from her son many years ago. She says it was called "John Wayne Cake" then and today it might be called "Brad Pitt Cake." But whatever you want to call it, most will agree that this is a luscious and rich dessert that is easy to make. This recipe calls for a flour-and-nut crust that was very tasty, but a graham-cracker crust certainly could be substituted if one preferred.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 8, 2004
Karen Hooper and her husband from Newport, Tenn., were looking for a recipe for the Caramel-Pecan Silk Supreme pie that they had enjoyed at the Bakers Square restaurant chain in California. Connie Bethune of Maynardville, Tenn., writes that she has recently moved from California and can "relate to Bakers Square and their delicious pies." She had her own recipe for a pie that she felt was very similar to the one served at the restaurant. In fact, she says, her family cannot tell the difference.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2003
Mary M. Young of Los Banos, Calif., requested a "side-dish recipe made with Jell-O that has ... been cut into small cubes and mixed with Cool Whip and other ingredients." Dana J. Shinholt of Columbia said: "I'm glad to respond with a favorite dish my grandmother served at our family gatherings. Nana would make a large Jell-O mold for the adults to share and individual cups for each of the grandchildren. She has been gone now for almost 15 years, and it took a little bit of searching to track down her recipe book.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARIA BLACKBURN and MARIA BLACKBURN,Sun Staff | September 22, 2002
The peon has a pen, and no boss is safe. Books by former assistants about their bosses are hot. From Park Avenue nannies to magazine underlings to stock market whiz kids, everyone, it seems, is using the boss as fodder for a memoir or a satire or a novel. And readers are consuming these books with hearty gusto. So here goes: The Bossman ate Jell-O. Red, mostly, and no Cool Whip -- please -- he hated the stuff. The Bossman also hated paper clips, and bad writing and people who "weren't serious."
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2001
When a young woman accompanied her new husband home to Allentown, Pa., for Thanksgiving a few decades ago, she encountered a cranberry relish that so teased and pleased her tongue that she asked her mother-in-law for the recipe. Susan Stamberg later broadcast the recipe over WAMU-FM in Washington, beginning a tradition that for National Public Radio listeners is proof that Thanksgiving is at hand. The exact date of that first broadcast is "lost in the mists of memory," she says, but she thinks this year's recitation, Nov. 16 on NPR's Morning Edition, marked the 29th or 30th rendition of a dish that has taken root on Thanksgiving tables around the country.
NEWS
By Joe Murray | December 12, 1995
ANGELINA COUNTY, Texas -- I woke up this morning, went to the cupboard and the cupboard was bare. Eight hungry dogs were looking over my shoulder. I thought I heard something growling. I hoped it was their stomachs.My wife and I had been to the grocery store the day before. I tried my best to buy dog food, knowing we were running low. My mistake.She explained to me, as you would to a child, that dog food at the grocery store was 10 cents more a can than at the discount store. Better to wait and save money.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2001
When a young woman accompanied her new husband home to Allentown, Pa., for Thanksgiving a few decades ago, she encountered a cranberry relish that so teased and pleased her tongue that she asked her mother-in-law for the recipe. Susan Stamberg later broadcast the recipe over WAMU-FM in Washington, beginning a tradition that for National Public Radio listeners is proof that Thanksgiving is at hand. The exact date of that first broadcast is "lost in the mists of memory," she says, but she thinks this year's recitation, Nov. 16 on NPR's Morning Edition, marked the 29th or 30th rendition of a dish that has taken root on Thanksgiving tables around the country.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | August 5, 1998
Responses to requests for Frog Eye Salad and stewed tomatoes have been received and tested. You are in for a treat.Frog Eye Salad was the request of Debbie Trimp of Sioux Falls, S.D. She wanted a version of this quick and simple noodle dish that didn't use eggs. Her response came from Trina Herll of Brandon, S.D.Ann Bailey of Pasadena wanted stewed tomatoes, and Mary W. Earl of Baltimore responded with a recipe that she says "came from Ms. Brown's cookbook at the Hilltop House in Harpers Ferry, W. Va. I have made these for the last 40 to 50 years.
NEWS
By Joe Murray | December 12, 1995
ANGELINA COUNTY, Texas -- I woke up this morning, went to the cupboard and the cupboard was bare. Eight hungry dogs were looking over my shoulder. I thought I heard something growling. I hoped it was their stomachs.My wife and I had been to the grocery store the day before. I tried my best to buy dog food, knowing we were running low. My mistake.She explained to me, as you would to a child, that dog food at the grocery store was 10 cents more a can than at the discount store. Better to wait and save money.
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