Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCool Water
IN THE NEWS

Cool Water

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | May 12, 2007
Sam Cohen of Baltimore noticed last winter when "lake-effect" snows buried Buffalo, N.Y. Cold air blowing across warm Great Lakes water kicks up huge snowfalls on the lee shores. He asks, "Did they ever get huge amounts of rain in the spring or summer?" In summer, they see the reverse - warm air over relatively cool water. That's so stable that areas downwind of the lakes in summer are some of the sunniest in the region. But the first cold blasts of autumn can trigger heavy lee-shore rains.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | August 8, 2012
Preseason has arrived as the first high school athletes hit the field today for the opening day of fall practice in the MIAA. Public schools start practice Saturday and the girls in the IAAM get back to work next Wednesday. With many athletes working harder than they have in a while, Archbishop Spalding's certified athletic trainer T.J. Morgan, president of the Maryland Athletic Trainers' Association, offers a few tips to help the young athletes keep themselves in the game as they rev up their training during the three-week stretch of preseason: HYDRATE!
Advertisement
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | October 2, 1990
THEY WERE the kind of couple you know have been through deco, retro, Armani, Nautilus, free weights, rap, punk and fusion, who have postmodern furniture in the living room, lava lamps by the bed and a photograph of James Dean over the toilet.She had hair like Elvis; he had hair like hers. She turned to him in the Korean grocery and said: "You know, we're completely out of water.""How did that happen?""I don't know how it happened. I'm simply telling you that there is not a drop of water in the house."
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
With the extreme heat, and even in less extreme temperatures, those who spend any time outside must stay properly hydrated. Some drinks are better than others, and some people need more fluids than others, says Dr. Marc I. Leavey, an internist at Mercy Medical Center and Lutherville Personal Physicians. Should people drink mineral/vitamin waters or Gatorade? And what about energy drinks (i.e., Red Bull, Rockstar): Are they dangerous? What about alcoholic drinks? For dehydration from exercise and heat, cool water is still the best.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 14, 2003
NEW RUSSIA, N.Y. - To four teen-agers from the suburbs, Split Rock Falls was a magical place - cool water rushing between the granite walls of a mountain ravine, forming pools for hours of lazy summertime swimming. On Tuesday afternoon, the four men - Adam Cohen, 19; Jonah Richman, 18; Jordan Satin, 19; and David Altschuler, 18 - returned to their favorite childhood summer haunt to find it engorged by a summer of heavy rain. By the end of the day, all four men, each an experienced swimmer, was dead, drowned in the waters they knew well.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Evening Sun Staff | December 18, 1991
What better gift at Christmas time than gloves for the hand you love to hold? The array of gloves in the marketplace is varied enough to suit any taste or task -- for him, warm, lined driving gloves for the bitter mornings he volunteers to warm up the car; for the youngsters, waterproof mittens that won't go soggy with snowballs.The brightest gloves this holiday are meant for her. Soft leathers are tinted in rich jewel colors and cut in soft suedes and leathers. There's more trim this season -- contrast cuffs, snappy gold buttons marching up the wrist and sprinkles of metal studs.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1999
Baltimore County's Gunpowder River is a nationally recognized destination for anglers, but its trout fishery is in danger of becoming a casualty of the drought gripping Maryland.Temperatures in the river are rising as the water level of the Prettyboy Reservoir recedes -- threatening a devastating fish kill.The reservoir's water is released into the Gunpowder so it can flow to Loch Raven Reservoir, which supplies the city and surrounding counties with drinking water. Water in the Prettyboy is warmer than usual now because it is so low.State officials say they are taking steps to protect the fishery, but if the drought forces a choice between its needs and those of homes and factories, the trout are out of luck.
FEATURES
By Atlanta Journal-Constitution | April 8, 1999
What we're missing is Air Fidos, expensive sneakers to allow your dog to reach its full athletic potential. Instead, there's a new sports beverage -- for dogs. Rebound, developed and marketed by Atlanta-based National Pet Supply, comes in two flavors -- Original (lemon-lime) and Ice Cool -- and retails for $1.99-$2.50 per 1.5-liter bottle. The marketers of this Gatorade for dogs promise it will replenish your canine's fluids lost in the heat of play and invigorate older dogs -- all without a smidgen of caffeine.
SPORTS
By MUPHEN WHITNEY | June 27, 1993
Karen Holloway, extension agent for agricultural science in Howard County, is celebrating her first year in the position. She came to the Howard extension office in July last year after several years in the same post in Allegany County."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2001
INDIANAPOLIS - Winston Cup rookie Casey Atwood walked into his team's trailer sucking on a water bottle. When he came to car owner Ray Evernham, he stopped. "Ray, this is my second bottle since I got out of the car," Atwood said. "It's about time you listened to me," Evernham said and added, "These guys go through a lot and sometimes they need to be reminded that the 6 to 8 pounds they lose in the race car is water weight." Asked if he was drinking more fluids because of the sudden death of Minnesota Vikings offensive tackle Korey Stringer to heat stroke, Atwood shook his head.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2010
With about 60 gallons of lemonade sold in six hours and more people jumping in line, Kent Harvin's stand at Artscape this year kept busy as attendees tried to stay cool. "It's really hot," said Harvin, a six-year Artscape veteran vendor, selling blue raspberry, pink lemonade and pina colada flavors of water ice at "Big Daddy's Water Ice" stand. "A lot of folks wait until the afternoon when it cools off. " By 4 p.m., people packed Charles Street in between booths at the annual art festival, but it wasn't much cooler.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun Reporter | May 1, 2008
GARMSIR, Afghanistan -- For the Marines fighting in southern Afghanistan, a shortage of drinking water turned out to be nearly as big a concern as Taliban insurgents. When Marines of Alpha and Bravo Companies, 1st Battalion, 6th Marines, pushed into Garmsir, a Taliban stronghold, before dawn Tuesday, each toted 18 half-liter bottles of water plus two liters in his pack. Their staggering 100- to 150-pound loads - including weapons, ammunition, mortar base plates, radios, flak vests and helmets and other gear - had troop commanders worried even before the operation began.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | May 12, 2007
Sam Cohen of Baltimore noticed last winter when "lake-effect" snows buried Buffalo, N.Y. Cold air blowing across warm Great Lakes water kicks up huge snowfalls on the lee shores. He asks, "Did they ever get huge amounts of rain in the spring or summer?" In summer, they see the reverse - warm air over relatively cool water. That's so stable that areas downwind of the lakes in summer are some of the sunniest in the region. But the first cold blasts of autumn can trigger heavy lee-shore rains.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | May 1, 2007
Anglers will get an extra week of catch-and-release striped bass fishing on the Susquehanna Flats, the sportsmen's paradise where the river meets the Chesapeake Bay. The season, which was supposed to end Thursday, has been extended until midnight May 10, said Marty Gary, a fisheries biologist with the Department of Natural Resources. A cool spring has kept the water well below 65 degrees, the temperature at which fish begin to die more quickly after being caught. Gary said a look at the long-range forecast and consultations with fishing and conservation groups, guides and Natural Resources Police convinced DNR that the catch-and-release season could continue with little harm to the striped bass, also known as rockfish.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 14, 2003
NEW RUSSIA, N.Y. - To four teen-agers from the suburbs, Split Rock Falls was a magical place - cool water rushing between the granite walls of a mountain ravine, forming pools for hours of lazy summertime swimming. On Tuesday afternoon, the four men - Adam Cohen, 19; Jonah Richman, 18; Jordan Satin, 19; and David Altschuler, 18 - returned to their favorite childhood summer haunt to find it engorged by a summer of heavy rain. By the end of the day, all four men, each an experienced swimmer, was dead, drowned in the waters they knew well.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 26, 2002
WASHINGTON - Nuclear reactor operators have been ordered to check reactor vessels after the discovery that acid in cooling water had eaten a hole nearly all the way through the 6-inch-thick lid of a reactor at a plant in Ohio. The corrosion left only a stainless-steel liner less than a half-inch thick to hold in cooling water under more than 2,200 pounds of pressure. At the Ohio plant, Davis-Besse, near Toledo, the stainless steel was bent by the pressure and would have broken if corrosion had continued, according to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | May 4, 1995
With its marine biotechnology laboratories and computer-assisted lecture hall, the $160 million Columbus Center downtown is in many respects a monument to the possibilities of modern science.But inside its shimmering glass and steel exterior, the air is cooled using a technology that dates to the ancient Egyptians.For all its modern science, the Columbus Center's air conditioning -- an enclosed cooling system that circulates chilled water through giant ice makers and pipes in the building's penthouse -- is surprisingly low-tech.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun Reporter | May 1, 2008
GARMSIR, Afghanistan -- For the Marines fighting in southern Afghanistan, a shortage of drinking water turned out to be nearly as big a concern as Taliban insurgents. When Marines of Alpha and Bravo Companies, 1st Battalion, 6th Marines, pushed into Garmsir, a Taliban stronghold, before dawn Tuesday, each toted 18 half-liter bottles of water plus two liters in his pack. Their staggering 100- to 150-pound loads - including weapons, ammunition, mortar base plates, radios, flak vests and helmets and other gear - had troop commanders worried even before the operation began.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2001
INDIANAPOLIS - Winston Cup rookie Casey Atwood walked into his team's trailer sucking on a water bottle. When he came to car owner Ray Evernham, he stopped. "Ray, this is my second bottle since I got out of the car," Atwood said. "It's about time you listened to me," Evernham said and added, "These guys go through a lot and sometimes they need to be reminded that the 6 to 8 pounds they lose in the race car is water weight." Asked if he was drinking more fluids because of the sudden death of Minnesota Vikings offensive tackle Korey Stringer to heat stroke, Atwood shook his head.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2001
Baltimore firefighters waged a cautious second-day attack yesterday on a nightmarish railroad tunnel fire that shut downtown businesses, knotted traffic, upset freight service along the East Coast and Midwest and disrupted e-mails and cell phone service. Temperatures in the century-old Howard Street Tunnel rose as high as 1,500 degrees Fahrenheit - hot enough to cause some of the CSX rail cars to glow, according to Battalion Chief Hector L. Torres, a Fire Department spokesman. "You're talking about metal glowing," he said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.