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NEWS
June 22, 1999
An article in Sunday's Maryland section describing the Historic Cadillac Parade on Pennsylvania Avenue did not mention the group that staged the event. It was organized by the Pennsylvania Avenue Committee, led by Chairman George Gilliam. The committee also sponsored a gospel, jazz and rhythm-and-blues festival at Robert C. Marshall Field after the parade. The article incorrectly reported that a separate Saturday event, Cool Jazz on the Avenue, was scheduled to continue Sunday. It was not.The Sun regrets the omissions and the error.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 6, 2009
BUD SHANK, 82 Purveyor of "cool jazz" Bud Shank, 82, who brought Brazilian music to U.S. audiences, helped define "cool jazz" in the 1950s and played the dreamlike flute solo on the Mamas and the Papas' 1965 hit "California Dreamin'," died Thursday at his home in Tucson. He had a lung ailment. Mr. Shank's 60-year career took him from the big bands of the 1940s to the Hollywood studios and to renewed respect as an innovator late in life. Along with Chet Baker, Gerry Mulligan and Dave Brubeck, Mr. Shank was one of the prime creators of the West Coast school of cool, a style of jazz seen as the relaxed, melodic counterpart of California life in the 1950s.
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NEWS
April 6, 2009
BUD SHANK, 82 Purveyor of "cool jazz" Bud Shank, 82, who brought Brazilian music to U.S. audiences, helped define "cool jazz" in the 1950s and played the dreamlike flute solo on the Mamas and the Papas' 1965 hit "California Dreamin'," died Thursday at his home in Tucson. He had a lung ailment. Mr. Shank's 60-year career took him from the big bands of the 1940s to the Hollywood studios and to renewed respect as an innovator late in life. Along with Chet Baker, Gerry Mulligan and Dave Brubeck, Mr. Shank was one of the prime creators of the West Coast school of cool, a style of jazz seen as the relaxed, melodic counterpart of California life in the 1950s.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 19, 2003
The cool sounds of jazz will be heard in Columbia this weekend when the annual Baltimore-Washington JAZZfest brings international artists and local performers to a Town Center nightclub, a historic house and the mall. In eight years, JAZZfest - which runs today through Sunday - has grown from one evening of music to four days with a diversity of acts, said Claude Ligon, chairman of the festival's executive board. "We are getting more and more artists coming in and bigger names," he said.
NEWS
January 22, 1996
Gerry Mulligan, 68, a baritone saxophonist and versatile jazz musician who worked with Dave Brubeck, Miles Davis and Duke Ellington, died Saturday of complications from a knee infection at his home in Darien, Conn.Mr. Mulligan helped create the cool jazz movement but was also at home in big band, be-bop and Dixieland. He was a bandleader and composer.He wrote arrangements for Johnny Warrington's radio band as a teen-ager and wrote for Gene Krupa's band. He became part of the cool jazz movement and took part in Mr. Davis' recordings in 1949 and 1950.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 29, 1991
Jazz innovator Miles Davis dies at 65 Miles Davis, a trumpeter and composer whose haunting tone and ever-changing style made him an elusive touchstone of jazz for four decades, died yesterday at a hospital in Santa Monica, Calif.Mr. Davis, 65, died of pneumonia, respiratory failure and a stroke, his doctor said.Mr. Davis' unmistakable, voicelike, nearly vibratoless tone -- at times distant and melancholy, at others assertive yet luminous -- has been imitated around the world.His solos, whether ruminating on a whispered ballad melody or jabbing against a beat, have been models for generations of jazz musicians.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1999
CLARIFICATIONAn article in Sunday's Maryland section describing the Historic Cadillac Parade on Pennsylvania Avenue did not mention the group that staged the event. It was organized by the Pennsylvania Avenue Committee, led by Chairman George Gilliam. The committee also sponsored a gospel, jazz and rhythm-and-blues festival at Robert C. Marshall Field after the parade. The article incorrectly reported that a separate Saturday event, Cool Jazz on the Avenue, was scheduled to continue Sunday.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 30, 1991
When jazz legend Miles Davis died Saturday after a stroke suffered in a Santa Monica, Calif. hospital, virtually every obituary said the same thing of the 65-year old trumpeter: that he was an original, an innovator, a trendsetter. And, of course, he was.But in the hype-strewn morass of American media culture, such praise comes cheap. Anyone can be an "innovator," from mall developers to shoe designers, and as such, the obits may have given the wrong impression of why Davis mattered.Because Miles Davis wasn't just an innovator -- he was one of the two or three most important musicians jazz has ever seen.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1998
Friday night in the Avenue Market and Tessa Hill-Aston is pumped. Half of Sandtown and Upton is here, standing shoulder to shoulder, filling the back half of the market as Carlos Johnson and his Zone One Band swing through another tune."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 19, 2003
The cool sounds of jazz will be heard in Columbia this weekend when the annual Baltimore-Washington JAZZfest brings international artists and local performers to a Town Center nightclub, a historic house and the mall. In eight years, JAZZfest - which runs today through Sunday - has grown from one evening of music to four days with a diversity of acts, said Claude Ligon, chairman of the festival's executive board. "We are getting more and more artists coming in and bigger names," he said.
NEWS
June 22, 1999
An article in Sunday's Maryland section describing the Historic Cadillac Parade on Pennsylvania Avenue did not mention the group that staged the event. It was organized by the Pennsylvania Avenue Committee, led by Chairman George Gilliam. The committee also sponsored a gospel, jazz and rhythm-and-blues festival at Robert C. Marshall Field after the parade. The article incorrectly reported that a separate Saturday event, Cool Jazz on the Avenue, was scheduled to continue Sunday. It was not.The Sun regrets the omissions and the error.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1999
CLARIFICATIONAn article in Sunday's Maryland section describing the Historic Cadillac Parade on Pennsylvania Avenue did not mention the group that staged the event. It was organized by the Pennsylvania Avenue Committee, led by Chairman George Gilliam. The committee also sponsored a gospel, jazz and rhythm-and-blues festival at Robert C. Marshall Field after the parade. The article incorrectly reported that a separate Saturday event, Cool Jazz on the Avenue, was scheduled to continue Sunday.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1998
Friday night in the Avenue Market and Tessa Hill-Aston is pumped. Half of Sandtown and Upton is here, standing shoulder to shoulder, filling the back half of the market as Carlos Johnson and his Zone One Band swing through another tune."
NEWS
January 22, 1996
Gerry Mulligan, 68, a baritone saxophonist and versatile jazz musician who worked with Dave Brubeck, Miles Davis and Duke Ellington, died Saturday of complications from a knee infection at his home in Darien, Conn.Mr. Mulligan helped create the cool jazz movement but was also at home in big band, be-bop and Dixieland. He was a bandleader and composer.He wrote arrangements for Johnny Warrington's radio band as a teen-ager and wrote for Gene Krupa's band. He became part of the cool jazz movement and took part in Mr. Davis' recordings in 1949 and 1950.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 30, 1991
When jazz legend Miles Davis died Saturday after a stroke suffered in a Santa Monica, Calif. hospital, virtually every obituary said the same thing of the 65-year old trumpeter: that he was an original, an innovator, a trendsetter. And, of course, he was.But in the hype-strewn morass of American media culture, such praise comes cheap. Anyone can be an "innovator," from mall developers to shoe designers, and as such, the obits may have given the wrong impression of why Davis mattered.Because Miles Davis wasn't just an innovator -- he was one of the two or three most important musicians jazz has ever seen.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 29, 1991
Jazz innovator Miles Davis dies at 65 Miles Davis, a trumpeter and composer whose haunting tone and ever-changing style made him an elusive touchstone of jazz for four decades, died yesterday at a hospital in Santa Monica, Calif.Mr. Davis, 65, died of pneumonia, respiratory failure and a stroke, his doctor said.Mr. Davis' unmistakable, voicelike, nearly vibratoless tone -- at times distant and melancholy, at others assertive yet luminous -- has been imitated around the world.His solos, whether ruminating on a whispered ballad melody or jabbing against a beat, have been models for generations of jazz musicians.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2009
Cool jazz tunes wafted through Pisces Lounge atop the Hyatt Regency as a chic crowd gathered to eat, drink and take in the view of the steamy Inner Harbor below. There would be plenty of sweat the next day, at Jason Murphy's Holding the Line Foundation's Football Camp. But, this was its swanky - and sweat-free - kickoff party for some participants and supporters. "My family taught me to always give back to the community," explained the host, Tennessee Titan lineman Jason Murphy. "So I hold the camp at my old alma mater, Edmondson High School.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | July 16, 2000
More than books filled the law library at the offices of Gordon, Feinblatt, Rothman, Hoffberger & Hollander. Cool jazz notes from the Frederick Douglass High School Quartet, mouth-watering aromas of hors d'oeuvres, and reminiscences of famous civil rights legal battles also occupied the space -- as did some 110 guests at a reception for the 16th annual NAACP Continuing Legal Education Program. The party's purpose was to hand out "Foot Soldiers in the Sand" Awards to Maryland lawyers Samuel Hamilton, Mark A. Darden III, Adrianne C. Jemmott and Stuart Jay Robinson for going beyond the call of duty in helping NAACP members and local citizens.
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