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By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Not long after his team finished a three-game sweep Sunday night of the league-best Los Angeles Angels, Kansas City Royals pitcher Jeremy Guthrie received a text message from one of his former teammates. Orioles reliever Brian Matusz congratulated Guthrie and the two exchanged brief pleasantries knowing that they'd probably have a chance to speak in person very soon. When the Orioles and Royals meet in Game 1 of the American League Championship Series on Friday night at Camden Yards, no player from either team will be able to put the unlikely matchup in perspective quite like Guthrie.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | March 9, 2006
Kiln-formed glass, a fairly new and uncommon fine art form to the city, is the subject of Resurgam Gallery's exhibit Hot Kilns, Cool Glass: Contemporary Glass Sculpture in Baltimore. Artists Frances Aubrey and Elizabeth O'Hara assembled glass pieces, then melted and cooled them in a computer-controlled kiln. O'Hara also used other ingredients such as clay in her works, Aubrey said. Kiln-formed glass emerged as a type of fine art about 25 years ago, Aubrey said. "It's such a new medium we haven't exhausted all the possibilities yet," she said.
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Local chefs share cool, creative uses for the kitchen staple. By Kit Waskom Pollard Eggs can do it all. Equally at home as breakfast on the go or as the centerpiece of an elegant dinner, it's no wonder that the simple ingredient holds a special place in chefs' hearts. Here, four local chefs share their favorite egg preparations, ranging from a simple crab omelet to delicate, sophisticated croquettes. Egg Yolk Croquettes with Bacon, Comté & Truffle Yields 6 servings In the Lord Baltimore Hotel's restaurant, The French Kitchen, Chef Jordan Miller experiments with high-tech toys, turning out dishes that combine ambition with great flavor - such as these carefully constructed croquettes in heady cheese-truffle-bacon sauce.
NEWS
By Peter Savodnik | January 4, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Republicans may control the White House and Congress. They may be right or wrong about tax cuts and preemptive military strikes. They may be moral or self-righteous or bumptious or bold. One thing Republicans are not: cool. This is why the GOP, for now, is headed toward victory in November. Beyond the obvious -- all the retiring Southern Democratic senators, the Republicans' money edge and the new prescription drug Medicare benefit -- coolness has much to do with it. Unlike Democrats -- who are as cool as anyone gets in Washington, a town not known for hepcats -- Republicans have cornered the market on uncoolness.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | December 22, 1997
WHEN DID ''cool'' come to mean ''fitting in''?Christmas being one of the holiest days on the Christian calendar, my youngest boys plan to rise early that morning, steal downstairs in the coolness of pre-dawn, kneel reverently before the tree and pray that when they open their eyes, they'll see Old Navy shirts and Air Jordan athletic shoes. These are priority items on their annual gimme lists.I used to think it was just all-American greed. Actually, I still do. But I've also come to realize that what motivates my boys is more complicated than avarice.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2001
On the cover of his latest jazz record, "From the Heart," Kim Waters is a portrait in cool: contemporary black T-shirt, natty mustache, vapor trail of a smile. He looks as though he could mow his yard in silk pajamas and not splash grass on himself. Waters is the Phil Jackson of contemporary jazz. When Waters was left stranded in a Florida hotel this year and missed most of a gig, he stayed cool. When Waters dropped his signature white-coated saxophone in Norfolk - the equivalent of Shaq fouling out of a Lakers game - Waters kept his cool.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | January 4, 2004
Now and then, the words nifty or groovy may drop into a conversation, instantly identifying the speaker as an old fogy or, worse, an old hippie. But the word cool doesn't do that. Cool is constant. As a modifier, as the modified, as a noun and as a verb, cool has withstood the fleeting nature of most slang. What is the reason for cool's longevity? That's an easy question for Keith Covington, owner of the New Haven Lounge in North Baltimore and jazz expert. As long as Miles Davis' classic 1949 work, Birth of the Cool, remains the best-selling jazz album of all time, cool will stay cool, he says.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 29, 1999
I EXPERIENCED a rare moment of righteousness this week. It happened when I switched on the air conditioner. As I stood in front of one of the air-conditioning vents, I was shivering, but smug. For the first time in my home-owning career, I had done what I was supposed to do on the air-conditioning front -- test the system in the spring, before the weather turned hot and sticky. All the tomes on how to be a good homeowner tell you this. They point out that there are two good reasons to test your air conditioner in cool weather.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | June 23, 1993
Think you're way cool?Take a number. According to Entertainment Weekly's current "What is Cool" issue, you're behind David Letterman (there's news); a dead man (cult film director Ed Wood); the assembly-required furniture at Ikea and "Today" anchor Katie Couric (doesn't she belong in the "So uncool, they're cool" column?).The June 25 issue of the weekly magazine identifies cool people, places and things that have "the power to swing the thermostat of popular culture."Yes, but what is cool?
NEWS
By Lane Page and For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
S ince they came out of the forest, our ancestors must have looked up to the skies for warm sunlight and cooling breezes. A few, looking down at natural steam vents and hot springs, found themselves able to take advantage of the earth itself for geothermal heat. Skipping to the present, when renewable energy tax credits, rebates and grants have refueled a serious interest in the underground energy source, this heat pump that uses water instead of air has taken a foothold in Howard County as a result of its long-term financial benefits, even after the demise of a local tax incentive.  Those who've gone with geothermal energy are pleased with their decisions.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
A cold front that moved through overnight was forecast to bring cooler weather Monday and through the week. Overnight lows were forecast in the 50s, and highs Monday are forecast in the mid-70s, about 10 degrees cooler than weekend temperatures. Partly cloudy to clear skies are forecast Monday, with blustery winds of 10-20 mph. Calm winds are forecast the rest of the week, but otherwise the weather is forecast to be the same -- with mostly clear skies and highs in the lower 70s and lows in the 50s, and possibly upper 40s in some areas.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Clouds, a few rain showers and cool temperatures are forecast for the Star-Spangled Spectacular festivities around Baltimore into this weekend. The celebrations are expected to start with some humid and possibly stormy weather. Uncomfortably humid air, cloudy skies and likely storms are forecast Thursday, the first day visiting tall ships will be open for tours. A 60 percent chance of storms is expected Thursday afternoon and evening. About a quarter of an inch of rain is possible, and some storms could be severe.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Tuesday is expected to be cool and cloudy with a chance of showers, with clouds and possibly rain predicted to continue over the next couple of days, according to the National Weather Service. The high will be around 75 degrees with about a 40 percent chance of rain Tuesday. Shower chances will continue overnight. A coastal flood advisory is in effect through 9 p.m. for the western shore of the Chesapeak Bay south of Baltimore. High tides are expected to be a foot to a foot and a half above normal.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 7, 2014
So, first question: If you could travel to the nation's capital from Baltimore in 15 minutes by super-fast train, would you? Sure you would. You'd give it a try at least once, if only to brag that you had achieved land speed of 300 mph. It would be a bucket list kind of thing. But would you go to the District of Columbia more often if you could get there in 15 minutes? I mean, really: Would having a high-speed train between Baltimore and Washington make you more interested in things D.C. - the Hirshhorn, the Nationals, protests in Lafayette Square, decriminalized pot?
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 31, 2014
My good walk began after an early supper: a short Jersey Boy from Isabella's in Little Italy. The Jersey Boy is an incredible little sandwich (grilled Italian sausage with rapini, and peppery cheese on six inches of baguette) heated in the brick oven in the small corner carryout at High and Stiles, where the neighborhood bocce teams gather for their evening games. Isabella's is not strictly a carryout; there are a few tables and chairs. But Tuesday they had the air-conditioning set on Polar Vortex, so I took the Jersey Boy with me. There was a shockingly blissful breeze and the temperature seemed to be falling, making the Inner Harbor feel more like Bar Harbor, so I decided to head for Camden Yards and the Orioles-Angels game.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | February 3, 2002
THE hottest topic in retailing is Hot Topic, a mall chain where you can buy $43 high-heel platform go-go boots, $6 cat-themed lingerie thongs and $17 Insane Clown Posse T-shirts. Hot Topic and its pubescent customers are ignorant of the recession. The company has booked sales and profit increases every quarter since the summer of 1999. Each square foot of the average Hot Topic store produced about $690 in sales last year, an achievement that blows away even the numbers posted by the Gap in its 1999 heyday.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2000
This year, the corn really is as high as an elephant's eye. And that's not the only happy news at the close of this rare Maryland summer of rain and blessedly cool nights. While farmers look forward to what could be a record corn harvest, and a near-record soy bean harvest this fall, Marylanders can anticipate an especially colorful autumn foliage season, thanks to the cool, moist summer weather. And everyone who uses electricity to cool their home or business has also reaped a bonus this summer.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Cloudy skies, slight storm chances and highs in the mid-80s are forecast Monday as cool air moves into the region for the week. Mostly cloudy skies are forecast throughout the day. Some isolated storms could pop up as a front moves through. On the other side of the front is cool, dry air expected to make for an unseasonably cool week. Highs Tuesday are forecast in the upper 70s, with highs in the lower 80s the rest of the week. Lows are forecast in the lower 60s. Dew points are forecast in the 50s, making the air feel dry. Mostly sunny skies are forecast Tuesday through the end of the work week.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
With his teammates killing time inside the clubhouse during a 1-hour, 38-minute rain delay Wednesday night, Orioles closer Zach Britton remained in the bullpen, waiting out the weather for his opportunity to close out a 6-4 win over the Texas Rangers at Camden Yards. Britton had just started warming up in the bottom of the eighth when the game was delayed with the Orioles needing just three outs for the victory. Instead of staying dry -- and cool -- inside the Orioles clubhouse, Britton remained in the bullpen beyond the left-center field fence with bullpen coach Dom Chiti and bullpen catcher Jett Ruiz.
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