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NEWS
April 27, 2003
On April 7, 2003, MADGE L. COOKSEY, of Ellicott City, MD, and formerly of Fort Lauderdale, FL; devoted wife of the late Kenneth D. Cooksey, Sr., for 54 years; beloved mother of Kenneth D. Cooksey, Jr. and his wife Paula Drake, of Jasper GA, W. Chris Cooksey and his wife Margaret, of Tallahassee, FL, and daughter Deborah G. Cooksey of Ellicott City, MD. Madge is also survived by seven grandchildren, Jennifer, David, Alex, Natalie, Ben, Sam and Dom, and...
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NEWS
By Jia-Rui Chong, Stephanie Simon and Nicholas Riccardi and Jia-Rui Chong, Stephanie Simon and Nicholas Riccardi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 1, 2007
DENVER -- A man infected with an extremely dangerous strain of tuberculosis was allowed into the United States at a border crossing even after a routine check of his passport set off a computerized alert, authorities said yesterday. Andrew Speaker, 31, a personal-injury lawyer from Atlanta, arrived at the border at Champlain, N.Y., from Canada on May 24 after disregarding explicit instructions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to remain in Italy - where he was on his honeymoon - for fear that he might spread the potentially lethal strain of TB. Speaker's father-in-law, Robert Cooksey, is a microbiologist at the CDC in the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination.
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SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Staff Writer | May 22, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- He failed to get the assistant's job the first time he applied for it in 1981, so for Steve Cooksey the thought of coaching track at the Naval Academy never really entered his mind until a meeting three years later with Navy track coach Al Cantello -- the man who made the decision not to hire him."We met again at the Olympic trials in Los Angeles in 1984 and he said, 'You want the [assistant coach's] job, come on,' " recalled Cooksey, who was then the head track coach at Ball State.
NEWS
April 27, 2003
On April 7, 2003, MADGE L. COOKSEY, of Ellicott City, MD, and formerly of Fort Lauderdale, FL; devoted wife of the late Kenneth D. Cooksey, Sr., for 54 years; beloved mother of Kenneth D. Cooksey, Jr. and his wife Paula Drake, of Jasper GA, W. Chris Cooksey and his wife Margaret, of Tallahassee, FL, and daughter Deborah G. Cooksey of Ellicott City, MD. Madge is also survived by seven grandchildren, Jennifer, David, Alex, Natalie, Ben, Sam and Dom, and...
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2002
Baltimore District Judge Charlotte M. Cooksey sent a blistering letter and judicial order to the state's pretrial services division yesterday, denouncing lawyers for failing to provide her with health information about female inmates assigned to the poorly ventilated Women's Detention Center. She had demanded the information last week after touring the jail at 301 E. Eager St. and hearing reports that inmates and employees were becoming ill from the heat. Temperatures, according to the public defender's office, have been as high as 117 degrees inside the building, which lacks air conditioning.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2002
The case now brewing in a Baltimore court centers on an alleged injustice: inhumane conditions at the city jail that exposed inmates to potentially deadly conditions. And although judges usually don't act as whistle-blowers, that's exactly what Charlotte M. Cooksey did. It's also indicative of the activism she has shown throughout her career as Baltimore's longest-sitting District Court judge, a player in the city's judicial system who often has taken it upon herself to make bold and sometimes unpopular decisions.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Caitlin Francke and Allison Klein and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 18, 2002
The head of a state ethics committee said yesterday that she would consider a request from new Baltimore District Judge Catherine Curran O'Malley to modify an opinion that severely restricts her role because she's married to the mayor and daughter of the state attorney general. But District Judge Charlotte M. Cooksey said she remembers revising only one opinion in her 17 years on the Judicial Ethics Committee. And Cooksey cautioned that the committee might not take up the matter again.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2002
A Baltimore District Court judge ordered yesterday that two dozen inmates be moved from the Women's Detention Center because of excessive heat in the facility, but jail officials did not comply with the order, saying there is nowhere to put the women. "I'm not defying the order. I can't comply with it," said LaMont W. Flanagan, commissioner of the state's Division of Pretrial Detention and Services. "I don't have the resources. There is no secure facility to move them to." The order, issued by Judge Charlotte M. Cooksey, came on a day when temperatures inside the poorly ventilated women's jail hovered at about 110 degrees.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2002
Calling the heat in the city's Women's Detention Center "sickening," Baltimore District Judge Charlotte M. Cooksey excoriated jail officials at a hearing last night and demanded to know the health status of all its inmates to determine whether temperatures at the facility would aggravate any medical conditions. "I am extremely concerned about the health of the people confined in that setting," Cooksey said of the 576 held at the jail that is overseen by the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1999
INDIAN HEAD -- Down by 15 points against Northern of Calvert County entering the championship round of last night's 15th annual Lackey Christmas Tournament, sixth-ranked Old Mill needed a big effort from each of its five finalists.But the Patriots fell short, 178.5 to 171.5, getting only three champs in Scott Roberts (125), Adam DeCosmo (130) and Dave Kim (Hwt). Dave Hicks (145) and Antoine Cooksey (171) were second, and Dwayne Jones (119), third.Northern clinched the title over 16 other teams when Ryan Foreman's 5-3 win over Hicks made it an insurmountable, 178.5-163.
NEWS
By Steve Mills and Steve Mills,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 23, 2003
LIVINGSTON, Texas - Illinois has emptied its Death Row. Much of the rest of the nation is rethinking its use of the death penalty. Yet here in the state with the country's busiest death chamber, executions are proceeding at a record pace. Eight of the nation's first 10 executions in 2003 - including six in January - were carried out in the Huntsville prison unit commonly called The Walls. Nearly half of the next two dozen scheduled executions also will be in Texas. By the end of March, Texas should record its 300th execution - more than one-third of all those in the country since the mid-1970s, when the death penalty was reinstated in the United States after a brief Supreme Court-imposed hiatus.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2002
The case now brewing in a Baltimore court centers on an alleged injustice: inhumane conditions at the city jail that exposed inmates to potentially deadly conditions. And although judges usually don't act as whistle-blowers, that's exactly what Charlotte M. Cooksey did. It's also indicative of the activism she has shown throughout her career as Baltimore's longest-sitting District Court judge, a player in the city's judicial system who often has taken it upon herself to make bold and sometimes unpopular decisions.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 29, 2002
PROSTITUTION has been called a "victimless" crime. Officer Patty Silver of the Southeastern District might disagree. Silver was working a Friday night sting detail about four weeks ago in the area of Dundalk and Holabird avenues. Working undercover and posing as a prostitute, Silver was picked up by a john. Eventually, she identified herself as a police officer and told the man he was under arrest. The man fought with Silver. He bit her once on the right forearm near her elbow and three more times on the left hand, inflicting nerve damage that may require surgery.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2002
A Baltimore District Court judge ordered yesterday that two dozen inmates be moved from the Women's Detention Center because of excessive heat in the facility, but jail officials did not comply with the order, saying there is nowhere to put the women. "I'm not defying the order. I can't comply with it," said LaMont W. Flanagan, commissioner of the state's Division of Pretrial Detention and Services. "I don't have the resources. There is no secure facility to move them to." The order, issued by Judge Charlotte M. Cooksey, came on a day when temperatures inside the poorly ventilated women's jail hovered at about 110 degrees.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2002
Baltimore District Judge Charlotte M. Cooksey sent a blistering letter and judicial order to the state's pretrial services division yesterday, denouncing lawyers for failing to provide her with health information about female inmates assigned to the poorly ventilated Women's Detention Center. She had demanded the information last week after touring the jail at 301 E. Eager St. and hearing reports that inmates and employees were becoming ill from the heat. Temperatures, according to the public defender's office, have been as high as 117 degrees inside the building, which lacks air conditioning.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2002
Calling the heat in the city's Women's Detention Center "sickening," Baltimore District Judge Charlotte M. Cooksey excoriated jail officials at a hearing last night and demanded to know the health status of all its inmates to determine whether temperatures at the facility would aggravate any medical conditions. "I am extremely concerned about the health of the people confined in that setting," Cooksey said of the 576 held at the jail that is overseen by the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 29, 2002
PROSTITUTION has been called a "victimless" crime. Officer Patty Silver of the Southeastern District might disagree. Silver was working a Friday night sting detail about four weeks ago in the area of Dundalk and Holabird avenues. Working undercover and posing as a prostitute, Silver was picked up by a john. Eventually, she identified herself as a police officer and told the man he was under arrest. The man fought with Silver. He bit her once on the right forearm near her elbow and three more times on the left hand, inflicting nerve damage that may require surgery.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2002
Though standing by its controversial opinion that family ties make it improper for District Court Judge Catherine Curran O'Malley to hear most cases, a state ethics panel said yesterday that it is really up to the judge to decide which cases to avoid. "The judge is certainly free to evaluate the need for recusal in individual cases," District Court Judge Charlotte M. Cooksey, chairman of the nine-member Judicial Ethics Committee, wrote in a letter received by O'Malley's lawyer yesterday.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Caitlin Francke and Allison Klein and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 18, 2002
The head of a state ethics committee said yesterday that she would consider a request from new Baltimore District Judge Catherine Curran O'Malley to modify an opinion that severely restricts her role because she's married to the mayor and daughter of the state attorney general. But District Judge Charlotte M. Cooksey said she remembers revising only one opinion in her 17 years on the Judicial Ethics Committee. And Cooksey cautioned that the committee might not take up the matter again.
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