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By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 31, 2002
Q. I read recently how great greens are for a healthy diet. My problem is that I have never been able to make them tasty enough to make my family like them. Can you tell me how to properly prepare greens? Maybe you could use kale as an example. A. You know the old saying, "If it tastes good, it has to be bad for you; if it's good for you, it's bound to taste bad." Although that holds true for a lot of things for me, it isn't the case when it comes to greens. The real trick to cooking greens is the cooking time -- either very long or very short, nothing in between.
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By Knight-Ridder/Tribune | September 24, 2005
You have a new convection oven, but you don't know how to use it. You're not alone. But bypassing an oven's convection feature means missing out on faster cooking times and being able to bake several dishes or a whole batch of cookies at the same time, said Beatrice Ojakangas, author of Cooking with Convection (Broadway Books, 2005) and more than 20 other cookbooks. "I tried to keep things pretty basic so people could make their own alterations on their own similar recipes," said Ojakangas, who lives in rural Duluth, Minn.
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April 19, 1998
Wild-Rice and Mushroom Stuffing (Sunday)Preparation time: 15 minutesCooking time: 10 minutes plus rice-cooking time1 cup wild rice4 cups water or sodium-reduced chicken broth1 teaspoon olive oil1/2 cup minced onion1/2 cup chopped celery1 teaspoon minced garlic2 cups sliced fresh mushrooms1/4 cup chopped dried apricots2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley1/4 cup honeyCombine rice and water or broth in a small saucepan; bring to boil. Cover, reduce heat and simmer about 45 minutes or until tender.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 31, 2002
Q. I read recently how great greens are for a healthy diet. My problem is that I have never been able to make them tasty enough to make my family like them. Can you tell me how to properly prepare greens? Maybe you could use kale as an example. A. You know the old saying, "If it tastes good, it has to be bad for you; if it's good for you, it's bound to taste bad." Although that holds true for a lot of things for me, it isn't the case when it comes to greens. The real trick to cooking greens is the cooking time -- either very long or very short, nothing in between.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder/Tribune | September 24, 2005
You have a new convection oven, but you don't know how to use it. You're not alone. But bypassing an oven's convection feature means missing out on faster cooking times and being able to bake several dishes or a whole batch of cookies at the same time, said Beatrice Ojakangas, author of Cooking with Convection (Broadway Books, 2005) and more than 20 other cookbooks. "I tried to keep things pretty basic so people could make their own alterations on their own similar recipes," said Ojakangas, who lives in rural Duluth, Minn.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | March 13, 1991
During the hectic workweek, preparing dinner for your famil can turn into a race against the clock. That's why people are rediscovering an old timesaving friend -- the pressure cooker. Pressure cookers are making a comeback because they cook certain foods, such as pot roasts and poultry, as much as three times faster than conventional cooking, with tender, juicy results. So next time you're caught in a kitchen time crunch, remember the pressure cooker.Why so fast? Inside a pressure cooker, the atmosphere surrounding the food gets much hotter than in other cooking methods.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | June 25, 1997
The many rewards of good nutritionEating five fruits and vegetables a day makes good health sense. The concept also won a Baltimore County student a trip to Walt Disney World. Ten-year-old Sara Kenney of White Marsh is the grand-prize winner in the Produce Partners/Five a Day National Art Competition. Her poster (above) breaks down the food equation with a banana and juice for breakfast, grapes for lunch and two vegetables with dinner.Subtropical delightNow in the stores: cherimoya, a subtropical fruit that's worth the premium price.
FEATURES
May 3, 1998
Braised Red Cabbage and Apples (Sunday)Makes 8 servingsPreparation time: 10 minutesCooking time: 40 to 55 minutes1 tablespoon margarine or butter1 large sliced red onionfreshly ground black pepper1 2-pound head red cabbage, trimmed, quartered, cored and cut crosswise into 1/4- to 1/2-inch slices4 ounces dried apples, cut crosswise into 1/4-inch slices2 to 3 tablespoons chopped fresh marjoram or 1 tablespoon dried2 tablespoons fresh lemon juiceIn a large,...
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | September 27, 1992
Wine and food have a special affinity. Though both are perfectly capable of standing on their own, the two are strengthened through their union at the dinner table.Much is made about selecting the "right" wine to go with food -- red wines with red meat, white wines with chicken and fish. And while there are good reasons for following that dictum, the best ++ wine to select for a particular meal is the one that pleases you most.The following menu is a simple one, designed to enhance wine and the pleasure that comes from pairing it with food.
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | March 13, 1991
Hearty, homey meals have appeal that transcends th seasons. Even when the coldest, bleakest days seem to have played out, the typical foods of winter still are welcome.Stuffed cabbage is a mainstay of many winter tables, though some cooks shy away from it, blaming time as the culprit. Stuffing individual little bundles of cabbage can be tedious, but there are short-cuts that streamline the preparation. Here, in lieu of blanching, the cabbage leaves are placed briefly in the freezer so that once thawed, with almost no effort, they are pliable enough to stuff.
FEATURES
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 13, 2002
Shrimp, though a pricey option, is one of the fastest-cooking entrees for weekday cooking. Whether it comes from your freezer or the fishmonger, it cooks in just a few minutes. In fact, you'll want to cook shrimp only until it turns pink. Cooking it any longer will result in tough, chewy morsels. The recipe here teams the seafood with classic Middle Eastern spices for a quick marinade and then spoons it over another quick-cooking ingredient, instant couscous. A sliced beet salad is one side option, using bottled pickled beets or plain, according to your taste.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | October 29, 2000
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick. SUNDAY / Family They didn't write a song about it, but Turkey-In-The-Bag sure is easy fixins' for the family.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 26, 1999
During Christmas week many of us will have family members coming to visit for the holidays.That's certainly the case at our house. Our son and his girlfriend will be traveling to our home for a few days. Everyone plans the Christmas meal in advance, but what about the other meals after the 25th? They are often the hardest to plan. I don't want to spend so many hours cooking that there's no time left for conversations with my kids.I finally came up with a solution. I had recently created a recipe for a Chicken, Mushroom and Tomato Ragout, which actually improves in flavor when made in advance.
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | September 16, 1998
If your family had a variety of home-cooked fresh seafood on a regular basis, you probably grew up in another part of the world. Or you like to fantasize about your childhood. Or you're under 30.No, frozen fish sticks and bottled shrimp cocktails don't count. Neither do tuna casseroles."As kids, many of us were exposed to poorly cooked fish at home. Some of it was so bad, it tasted like boiled wool," says Leslie Revsin, author of "Great Fish, Quick" (Doubleday, 1997, $27.50). "People will order seafood in restaurants, but many are not comfortable cooking it. And it's too bad, because it's so delicious.
FEATURES
May 3, 1998
Braised Red Cabbage and Apples (Sunday)Makes 8 servingsPreparation time: 10 minutesCooking time: 40 to 55 minutes1 tablespoon margarine or butter1 large sliced red onionfreshly ground black pepper1 2-pound head red cabbage, trimmed, quartered, cored and cut crosswise into 1/4- to 1/2-inch slices4 ounces dried apples, cut crosswise into 1/4-inch slices2 to 3 tablespoons chopped fresh marjoram or 1 tablespoon dried2 tablespoons fresh lemon juiceIn a large,...
FEATURES
April 19, 1998
Wild-Rice and Mushroom Stuffing (Sunday)Preparation time: 15 minutesCooking time: 10 minutes plus rice-cooking time1 cup wild rice4 cups water or sodium-reduced chicken broth1 teaspoon olive oil1/2 cup minced onion1/2 cup chopped celery1 teaspoon minced garlic2 cups sliced fresh mushrooms1/4 cup chopped dried apricots2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley1/4 cup honeyCombine rice and water or broth in a small saucepan; bring to boil. Cover, reduce heat and simmer about 45 minutes or until tender.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 29, 1995
Around here, brisket is often pickled and turned into a corned beef or pastrami sandwich. But there is another brisket. One that might be described as corned beef's country-western cousin. Out West, this same cut of beef is treated far differently than in these parts. It is rubbed with seasoning, cooked slowly over a wood fire, sliced against the grain, and served as a sensational supper.Tom Mackin is familiar with the joy of smoked brown brisket. About once a year, Mackin, a transplanted Texan now living outside Baltimore in Howard County cooks about 50 briskets at a summer picnic for parishioners of Christ Church Episcopal in Columbia.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 13, 1996
IN ITS PRIMAL state, popcorn looks like a small, hard ear of sweet corn, not a package on a grocery-store shelf. Most of the popcorn crop is harvested in the fall, so now you can find the occasional ear, au naturel, being sold at roadside stands or in community markets.The other day I bought three ears of popcorn from Pam Pahl at the stand she and her husband, Les, operate at the Farmers' Market on Sunday mornings in downtown Baltimore. I had plans to get my hands dirty. I thought I was going to hold one of those cobs over a big bowl and rub the cob back and forth in the palms of my hands.
FEATURES
By NANCY ROSS RYAN and NANCY ROSS RYAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 7, 1998
Mitchell Davis understands that not everyone who loves food knows how to cook it. That's why his book, "Cook Something" (Macmillan, $19.95), combines the simplicity of a primer with the sophistication of a food-lovers' cookbook."
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | June 25, 1997
The many rewards of good nutritionEating five fruits and vegetables a day makes good health sense. The concept also won a Baltimore County student a trip to Walt Disney World. Ten-year-old Sara Kenney of White Marsh is the grand-prize winner in the Produce Partners/Five a Day National Art Competition. Her poster (above) breaks down the food equation with a banana and juice for breakfast, grapes for lunch and two vegetables with dinner.Subtropical delightNow in the stores: cherimoya, a subtropical fruit that's worth the premium price.
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