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By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Baltimore County police say a Middle River resident acted quickly to stop a gunman during a recent home invasion. Police said four people forced open a door to the house, in the 100 block of Alberge Lane, at around 12:30 a.m. Feb. 21. One would-be robber armed with a single-barrel rifle, confronted an occupant, police said. The resident disarmed the suspect by throwing cold cooking oil on him. Two other residents came to aide of the first, and together they were able to detain two of the suspects, police said.
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By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Baltimore County police say a Middle River resident acted quickly to stop a gunman during a recent home invasion. Police said four people forced open a door to the house, in the 100 block of Alberge Lane, at around 12:30 a.m. Feb. 21. One would-be robber armed with a single-barrel rifle, confronted an occupant, police said. The resident disarmed the suspect by throwing cold cooking oil on him. Two other residents came to aide of the first, and together they were able to detain two of the suspects, police said.
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NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | July 10, 1995
A two-alarm fire started by cooking oil left unattended destroyed a house in Columbia, displaced four residents and injured one firefighter Friday afternoon, Howard County fire officials said.The firefighter was treated for heat exhaustion at Howard County General Hospital and released.The residents -- Eric Rall; his wife, Karen; son, Eric Jr., 13; and daughter, Christina, 4 -- were seeking housing through their insurance company Friday, fire officials said.According to investigators from the state fire marshal's office, the fire started after the teen-ager began heating oil for deep frying, then left the kitchen.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY | July 22, 2008
THE PROBLEM A barrel of old kitchen grease has been sitting behind an abandoned fast-food restaurant for months. THE BACKSTORY Louis Fields had been calling city officials and agencies for more than two months, trying to get a steel drum removed from an alley off the 600 block of N. Franklintown Road in West Baltimore. Liquid from the 55-gallon barrel, behind a former fast-food restaurant, was dripping down the alley toward the drain. Fields was concerned that the contents were spilling near yards where children play.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | October 15, 2006
The chemistry lab at the Naval Academy smelled faintly like a fast-food restaurant or a doughnut shop. But the thick, purplish liquid swirling in the flask was nothing a midshipman would want drizzled on his dinner plate. Midshipmen had picked out all the bread crumbs and crusts from the used vegetable oil in King Hall, and Chad Theriault, 20, was adding, drip by drip, a potassium hydroxide solution, waiting for the syrupy goo to turn pink. Theriault, a sophomore, tinkered with the solution, eyeing the flask through his safety goggles and pouring in more and more potassium hydroxide until it changed color.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,[Sun reporter] | April 1, 2007
If you think your thesis in college was grueling, try this out: Take a go-kart and modify its engine so it can run on both diesel fuel and used cooking oil, the kind with chunks of fried stuff in it. But that's not all. For a handful of Naval Academy seniors trying to complete their "capstone" mechanical engineering project, the challenge requires them to build an engine that can power the go-cart on diesel fuel from their engineering building to the...
FEATURES
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 21, 1999
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- Abraham Lincoln couldn't have imagined it: 136 years after the biggest battle ever fought on North American soil, caretakers of these hallowed grounds are battling a new foe -- vegetable oil.In a mysterious act that may be connected to a religious ritual, someone last month poured cooking oil on 17 Civil War monuments here, then moved on to deface six monuments at Antietam National Battlefield in Maryland.The oil, which has left dark splotches on the gray stone memorials, is difficult -- maybe impossible -- to remove.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | July 10, 1991
Get 'em while you can! It's peak season for plump crisp-tender snap peas.Snap Peas with Walnuts8 ounces snap peas, cleaned2 tablespoons water1/4 cup apple juice2 teaspoons walnut oil or cooking oil1 teaspoon cornstarch1/4 teaspoon salt2 tablespoons broken walnutsRed leaf lettuce (optional)Apple wedges (optional)Edible marigold petals (optional)In a one-quart microwave-safe casserole combine snap peas and water. Cook, covered, on 100 percent power (high) for 3 1/2 to five minutes (low-wattage ovens: five to six minutes)
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | March 24, 1991
A 23-year-old Easton woman died late Friday in a fire tha started after she left some cooking oil heating unattended on the kitchen stove.Dana Lynn Krumwied, a native of West Chester, Pa., had moved to her two-story duplex in the 300 block of Maple Avenue just one month ago, said Bob Thomas, deputy chief state fire marshal.The fire started about 11:15 p.m., Mr. Thomas said, when Ms. Krumwied and her 21-year-old boyfriend, Victor Joseph Brown, forgot about some cooking oil heating on the stove.
FEATURES
October 30, 1990
This classic chicken dish has been slimmed down to make a fast, healthy meal for your family. Most cooks will need to supplement their pantry with just seven ingredients. The recipe makes six servings. Take the leftovers for lunch.WHAT YOU NEED6 skinned, boned small chicken breast halves (3 ounces each)2 tablespoons olive oil or cooking oil2 medium sweet red or green peppers, cut into strips1 large onion, thinly sliced and separated into rings (1 cup)2 cloves garlic, mincedTwo 4-ounce jars whole button mushrooms, drained1/2 cup dry white wine1/4 teaspoon crushed dried red pepper (optional)
NEWS
By Michael Cross-Barnet | June 28, 2008
If the planet runs out of oil just a smidgen later than it otherwise would have, Mark Nagurney will deserve some of the thanks. The Laurel physicist isn't waiting for auto companies or the government to act when it comes to alternative fuels. As The Sun's Tom Pelton reported, Mr. Nagurney has taken matters into his own hands, converting his diesel car so it can run on used vegetable oil. It's seemingly a triple win: Mr. Nagurney avoids pain at the pump, a local restaurant is rid of its waste oil, and the environment is a bit cleaner (most scientists believe that vegetable oil is less polluting than petroleum-based fuels)
NEWS
By Evan Halper and Evan Halper,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 9, 2008
Dave Eck, a Half Moon Bay, Calif., mechanic, had attracted a media spotlight with his fleet of vehicles fueled by used fryer grease from a local chowder house. So when Sacramento called, he figured officials wanted advice on alternative fuels. Not at all. The government rang to notify Eck that he was a tax cheat. He was scolded for failing to get a "diesel fuel supplier's license," reporting quarterly how many gallons of grease he burns and paying a tax on each gallon. "All of a sudden they nailed me for a road tax," said Eck, who drives a Hummer converted to run on vegetable oil. "I said, `Not a problem.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,[Sun reporter] | April 1, 2007
If you think your thesis in college was grueling, try this out: Take a go-kart and modify its engine so it can run on both diesel fuel and used cooking oil, the kind with chunks of fried stuff in it. But that's not all. For a handful of Naval Academy seniors trying to complete their "capstone" mechanical engineering project, the challenge requires them to build an engine that can power the go-cart on diesel fuel from their engineering building to the...
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 19, 2007
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- It's Friday afternoon, and that means Daniel Chitungwiza is putting another package of rice, cooking oil and other basics on the overnight bus to his beleaguered mother and brothers back home in Zimbabwe. "They won't die without it," he said of the weekly shipments from South Africa, "but they will be hungry." As once-prosperous Zimbabwe's seven-year economic slide deepens, legions of expatriates like Chitungwiza are keeping their families afloat. They regularly send staples that their relatives - amid a 1,700 percent annual inflation rate - can no longer afford or even find on bare store shelves.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | October 15, 2006
The chemistry lab at the Naval Academy smelled faintly like a fast-food restaurant or a doughnut shop. But the thick, purplish liquid swirling in the flask was nothing a midshipman would want drizzled on his dinner plate. Midshipmen had picked out all the bread crumbs and crusts from the used vegetable oil in King Hall, and Chad Theriault, 20, was adding, drip by drip, a potassium hydroxide solution, waiting for the syrupy goo to turn pink. Theriault, a sophomore, tinkered with the solution, eyeing the flask through his safety goggles and pouring in more and more potassium hydroxide until it changed color.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | June 21, 2006
CHICAGO -- The people at the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) could give meddlesome busybodies a bad name. In fact, that almost seems to be the point of their latest lawsuit, which targets KFC's use of cooking oil with trans fat. CSPI thinks that if companies and customers don't shun this type of fat, the courts should step in and force them to. Scientists generally agree that trans fat is not the healthiest thing to include in your diet....
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | October 8, 2000
Q. One of your readers described how eating hot salsa gave her relief from psoriasis. My solution is a little different, but equally unusual. I suffered from scalp psoriasis for years. This skin condition is hereditary in my family, and the scales covered my entire head. I got no relief from prescription medicine, so I tried every oil you can imagine: cooking oil, soybean oil and olive oil. The extra-virgin olive oil did the trick. In two months there was a noticeable difference, and within six months all my scales had disappeared, except for a tiny patch over each ear. What a relief!
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | August 18, 2005
BRIDGEHAMPTON, N.Y. - Talk about culture shock. I'm writing this on the patio of a mansion, looking out at a swimming pool set in an expansive lawn kept green by automatic sprinklers and surrounded by hedgerows. Not far away, fields of corn stand high, others are rich with potatoes and all sorts of vegetables. There are vineyards and flowers. The sky is overcast, but it's still beautiful here. The only concern is that the sun may not get through for long enough to make a good beach day. This time last week, I was in Kawa Fako, a village in the province of Dogondoutchi in Niger with a team of Americans and Nigeriens distributing food rations to the starving people of that community.
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