Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCookie Monster
IN THE NEWS

Cookie Monster

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Alan Lupo | September 22, 1992
THE nation is beset by deficit, depression and doubt about its ability to live up to its potential, and what is the Republican Party going to do?It is going to collar and cuff Big Bird and the Cookie Monster.This is not classified information. It's right there in the GOP platform under "Managing Government in the Public Interest.""We deplore the blatant political bias of the government-sponsored radio and television networks. It is especially outrageous that taxpayers are now forced to underwrite this biased broadcasting through the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
See that above? On the right, you have the present-day girls' Big Bird costume. On the left? That's me in the 1982 version of the girls' Big Bird costume. Wait, my bad. Back then, it was just a Big Bird costume, no gender roles necessary. I mean, I know this has been going for ages, and that Halloween has turned into a way for people (grownups, one hopes) to let out their sexpot side for a day. (Check out this illustration of how costumes evolve from unicorn to sexy unicorn, nurse to sexy nurse, bee to sexy bee.)
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
For yesterday's Sunrise section, I wrote a story about the summer song that just keeps multiplying itself thanks to spoofs, remixes and covers, Carly Rae Jepsen's "Call Me Maybe. " Now, Sesame Street has joined the fun. Check out Cookie Monster singing "Share It Maybe. " Can I have one of those cookies?
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
For yesterday's Sunrise section, I wrote a story about the summer song that just keeps multiplying itself thanks to spoofs, remixes and covers, Carly Rae Jepsen's "Call Me Maybe. " Now, Sesame Street has joined the fun. Check out Cookie Monster singing "Share It Maybe. " Can I have one of those cookies?
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | September 13, 2000
A monster of a cookie Cookie Monster can now be found in his favorite place -- the cookie aisle of your local grocery store. Sesame Street and Keebler have teamed up to create cookies and crackers packaged in bags and boxes featuring the characters of Big Bird, Bert and Ernie, Elmo and Cookie Monster. The recommended retail price ranges from $1.79 to $2.79. Bounty on the Shore Summer's nearly over, but there's still reason to cross the Bay Bridge -- fall vegetables. To help consumers find their way, the Lower Eastern Shore Heritage Committee has produced a brochure listing farmers' markets and pick-your-own farms on the Lower Eastern Shore.
FEATURES
By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,HARTFORD COURANT | April 5, 2005
Bad news for Cookie Monster - the focus of the 36th Sesame Street season, which starts this week, is healthful eating habits. Although there are no plans to turn the lovable, cookie-chomping blue Muppet into Cauliflower Monster, the oversized, letter-of-the-day cookie he chomped down in yesterday's season premiere would likely be one of his last. Joining the battle against childhood obesity, the season-long theme of "Healthy Habits for Life" is clear from the jump-roping that started the episode to the longer-than-usual segment called "The Healthy Foods Name Game," in which Elmo and Zoe scoured the neighborhood for colorful vegetables to complete a puzzle.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
The 37 kindergartners from Freedom Elementary School sat attentively as Cookie Monster and Big Bird bantered about what was more important: eating a cookie or dousing the flames in their clothing. After some persuasion, Cookie Monster agreed that the first thing to do was put out the fire. "Then can I eat my cookie?" he asked. The cookie had to wait, Big Bird said, until he stopped, dropped and rolled to put out the flames. As Cookie Monster and Big Bird sang the "Stop, Drop and Roll" song, the children rocked to the music.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1999
Ten-year-old Jessica Stein had long forgotten about the raffle when she heard her name announced over the loudspeaker.She raced across the square.It was a small prize, compared with the recent Big Game lottery -- a bag of books, videos and stuffed animals from Maryland Public Television -- but just as exciting for a little girl who didn't think she had a chance, who had announced, early in the day, that "we have about three chances out of a million."Jessica...
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 6, 1999
Poor, little CinderElmo (Elmo the Muppet). All the little red guy wants is to go to the ball and dance with the beautiful Princess (Keri Russell).But CinderElmo's wicked stepmother (Kathy Najimy) won't let him out of the kitchen. She doesn't want anyone at the ball who might compete for the hand of the Princess with her two handsome sons, Telly Monster and Baby Bear.Don't cry, CinderElmo. Despite the gender bending -- with a princess rather than a prince and you instead of that weepy Cinderella girl in the lead -- I think I know how this story ends.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin E. Washington and Kevin E. Washington,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2004
It seems that manufacturers of computer peripherals and game controllers must be testing their mice and controllers on guys about 6-foot-8 with massive hands. That's my conclusion after the first Microsoft Xbox controller caused my hands to cramp and I watched dozens of children under 10 struggle to get a good grasp on a computer mouse. KidzMouse Inc., a California-based company, has independently taken note of the latter observation. The manufacturer of niche peripherals and educational software has come up with kid-size mice that they're selling in major stores and online at their Web site, www.kidzmouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2005
Elmo, the furry red star of Sesame Street, may be eternally 3 years old, but the Philadelphia-area amusement park that puts the monster and his pals center stage turns 25 this year, with a season of events and offers to make it worth the trip. Sesame Place is a 14-acre water park, perfect for kids who aren't quite ready for the thrills of places like Six Flags or Hershey but would love to get wet and meet their favorite characters from the television show. But there's something for everyone.
FEATURES
By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,HARTFORD COURANT | April 5, 2005
Bad news for Cookie Monster - the focus of the 36th Sesame Street season, which starts this week, is healthful eating habits. Although there are no plans to turn the lovable, cookie-chomping blue Muppet into Cauliflower Monster, the oversized, letter-of-the-day cookie he chomped down in yesterday's season premiere would likely be one of his last. Joining the battle against childhood obesity, the season-long theme of "Healthy Habits for Life" is clear from the jump-roping that started the episode to the longer-than-usual segment called "The Healthy Foods Name Game," in which Elmo and Zoe scoured the neighborhood for colorful vegetables to complete a puzzle.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
The 37 kindergartners from Freedom Elementary School sat attentively as Cookie Monster and Big Bird bantered about what was more important: eating a cookie or dousing the flames in their clothing. After some persuasion, Cookie Monster agreed that the first thing to do was put out the fire. "Then can I eat my cookie?" he asked. The cookie had to wait, Big Bird said, until he stopped, dropped and rolled to put out the flames. As Cookie Monster and Big Bird sang the "Stop, Drop and Roll" song, the children rocked to the music.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
The 37 kindergartners from Freedom Elementary School sat attentively as Cookie Monster and Big Bird bantered about what was more important: eating a cookie or dousing the flames in their clothing. After some persuasion, Cookie Monster agreed that the first thing to do was put out the fire. "Then can I eat my cookie?" he asked. The cookie had to wait, Big Bird said, until he stopped, dropped and rolled to put out the flames. As Cookie Monster and Big Bird sang the "Stop, Drop and Roll" song, the children rocked to the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin E. Washington and Kevin E. Washington,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2004
It seems that manufacturers of computer peripherals and game controllers must be testing their mice and controllers on guys about 6-foot-8 with massive hands. That's my conclusion after the first Microsoft Xbox controller caused my hands to cramp and I watched dozens of children under 10 struggle to get a good grasp on a computer mouse. KidzMouse Inc., a California-based company, has independently taken note of the latter observation. The manufacturer of niche peripherals and educational software has come up with kid-size mice that they're selling in major stores and online at their Web site, www.kidzmouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Martin F. Kohn and Martin F. Kohn,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | September 11, 2003
If they can keep a beat and carry a tune, we are more likely to listen, and if they're really good at it, we may never realize we're learning at all. That is the genius of TV's Sesame Street, which for 35 seasons has been giving us the lowdown on letters and numbers and imparting lessons about sharing, acceptance, kindness -- and, before it became an overused buzzword, diversity. Children, adults, anthropomorphic puppets, blue monsters, yellow birds, celebrities: They all get along on Sesame Street, an obviously urban enclave where everything's A-OK and the air is sweet, never mind that actual cities may be troubled and polluted.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
The 37 kindergartners from Freedom Elementary School sat attentively as Cookie Monster and Big Bird bantered about what was more important: eating a cookie or dousing the flames in their clothing. After some persuasion, Cookie Monster agreed that the first thing to do was put out the fire. "Then can I eat my cookie?" he asked. The cookie had to wait, Big Bird said, until he stopped, dropped and rolled to put out the flames. As Cookie Monster and Big Bird sang the "Stop, Drop and Roll" song, the children rocked to the music.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
See that above? On the right, you have the present-day girls' Big Bird costume. On the left? That's me in the 1982 version of the girls' Big Bird costume. Wait, my bad. Back then, it was just a Big Bird costume, no gender roles necessary. I mean, I know this has been going for ages, and that Halloween has turned into a way for people (grownups, one hopes) to let out their sexpot side for a day. (Check out this illustration of how costumes evolve from unicorn to sexy unicorn, nurse to sexy nurse, bee to sexy bee.)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 4, 2002
Elmo is scared. Cookie Monster has a new way to get even more cookies. And Big Bird is headed for cyberspace. That's the news from Sesame Street as the greatest show in the history of children's television returns for its 33rd season today - with some major changes. Change is good in this case, thanks in no small part to the fact that such familiar and beloved Muppets as Bert and Ernie and friends like Maria (Sonia Manzano) are there to lead us through it. The most fascinating segment in today's season premiere episode was written in response to the events of Sept.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | September 13, 2000
A monster of a cookie Cookie Monster can now be found in his favorite place -- the cookie aisle of your local grocery store. Sesame Street and Keebler have teamed up to create cookies and crackers packaged in bags and boxes featuring the characters of Big Bird, Bert and Ernie, Elmo and Cookie Monster. The recommended retail price ranges from $1.79 to $2.79. Bounty on the Shore Summer's nearly over, but there's still reason to cross the Bay Bridge -- fall vegetables. To help consumers find their way, the Lower Eastern Shore Heritage Committee has produced a brochure listing farmers' markets and pick-your-own farms on the Lower Eastern Shore.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.