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NEWS
January 26, 2012
I usually read Dan Rodricks ' commentaries to get his left of center take on local and national issues because he supports his points. However, in his latest piece about Mitt Romney he demonstrates the same class warfare that the current administration uses to castigate those who have followed the rules, taken risks and profited from their investments ("A man out of tune with the times," Jan. 22). Mr. Rodricks shows he has drunk the Democratic Kool-Aid by implying that Mr. Romney is part of a movement by the rich to regain the presidency.
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NEWS
July 18, 2013
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Darrell Issa, the chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, and Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, the Baltimore lawmaker and top-ranking Democrat on the often contentious committee have never enjoyed a particularly strong relationship. And so tensions were already high when Issa, a California Republican, referred to Cummings on Thursday as "a little boy with his hand caught in the cookie jar" during a hearing that quickly captured national attention and prompted Issa to clarify his remarks a few hours later.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 5, 1997
JUDY ROSENBERG has firm ideas about cookies. She believes in using butter, the real unsalted stuff. She preaches the benefits of preheating your oven, and of using baking sheets lined with parchment paper.She has some unflattering things to say about an American institution: the cookie jar. The cookie jar is only good for short-term storage, a day or two, she says. The refrigerator and the freezer are better spots to store cookies.She gave me these cookie tips during a stop in Baltimore to promote her new book, "Rosie's Bakery Chocolate-Packed, Jam-Filled, Butter-Rich, No-Holds-Barred, Cookie Book" (Workman, $13)
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Firefighters from the Rivers Park Fire Station had only one question for Casey Dyson as they sampled home-baked cookies from her fledgling delivery service: Does she pack cold milk on her scooter? Dyson, a Columbia resident who launched CookieRide in August after four months of paperwork and preparation, carries six varieties of cookies - but no beverages. The firefighters at the Old Columbia Road station gave their approval to her quarter-pound chocolate chip cookies and smaller Power Bites - an original recipe made of nuts, flax seed, and dried blueberries and cherries that was inspired by a physical therapist seeking a snack high in antioxidants.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2003
When the Tasmanian Devil arrived, the first thing Laraine Harford did was carry him to the kitchen. She gingerly removed the cartoon character cookie jar from its box, pulled off his head and began carefully pouring tap water inside, one measuring cup at a time. At 20 cups, she stopped. Big enough, she thought. She smiled with satisfaction. Her two-year quest was over. Harford poured the water out, let Taz air dry and put him back in his carton. She swathed that with bubble wrap, placed the bundle in a clear plastic bin filled with chunks of shipping foam and snapped the top firmly in place, sliding the bin under the table that holds her African violets.
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | August 21, 1994
Q: I have a pair of porcelain vases that stand 10 inches high. On the bottom of each vase are the letters "KPM-W." They are decorated with pink and blue flowers and trimmed in gold. Do they have any value?A: Your vases were made by Krister Porcelain Manufactory, in Waldenburg, Silesia, Germany. The company was established in and is still in operation. This mark was used around 1900. Each vase could be worth about $150 to $175 in good condition.Q: I haven't been able to find any information about my "Friar Tuck" cookie jar. He is wearing a brown robe and a white rope belt.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE | October 22, 1995
Our friend wants to sell a collection of Peruvian and Ecuadorean antiques and artifacts which her husband collected. Many pieces date back to the Inca civilization. Who might be interested?A knowledgeable fellow who buys, sells and answers questions regarding such pieces is Kip McKesson. Write him, enclosing sharp photos of the items, c/o Global Imports Gallery, Antique Traditional Art & Jewelry From Around the World, P.O. Box 4943, East Lansing, Mich. 48826.Enclose a self-addressed stamped envelope for a reply, or phone him at (517)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | November 19, 1998
Need a teapot, a mug, a platter, a vase, a cookie jar, a box? Or, even if you don't actually need any of the above, maybe you'd like to have something, or give something, from the fourth annual Holiday National Invitational Exhibition, called "Winterfest 1998," that just opened at Clayworks.Functional is the hallmark of this show, and the key word is national - the show's 20 ceramics artists hail from as near as Maryland and Virginia, but also as far as Utah, Colorado, Texas, Minnesota and Montana, with North Carolina, Tennessee and New York in between.
NEWS
July 18, 2013
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Darrell Issa, the chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, and Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, the Baltimore lawmaker and top-ranking Democrat on the often contentious committee have never enjoyed a particularly strong relationship. And so tensions were already high when Issa, a California Republican, referred to Cummings on Thursday as "a little boy with his hand caught in the cookie jar" during a hearing that quickly captured national attention and prompted Issa to clarify his remarks a few hours later.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
NAME: Moose BREED: English Mastiff AGE: Nine HOME: Reisterstown OWNER: Martha Frick Symington Sanger “Martie” HOW WE MET: When choosing a pup from a litter of English Mastiffs I knew Moose was meant for me. As if saying “the world is too much with me,” a common feeling for writers such as myself, he was snuggled away between a kitchen wall and the refrigerator, as far as he could get from his rambunctious mates....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special To The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
Ramona Cooper from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for making a cookie similar to the "Dad's old fashioned oatmeal cookie" that used to be available in Baltimore many years ago. It turns out that Dad's Original Scotch Oatmeal cookies have been around since the turn of the century and, while no longer available in Baltimore, they are still being made by Dad's Cookie Co. in St. Louis. The cookies are available at the company's retail outlet in St. Louis or by mail order through their website.
NEWS
January 26, 2012
I usually read Dan Rodricks ' commentaries to get his left of center take on local and national issues because he supports his points. However, in his latest piece about Mitt Romney he demonstrates the same class warfare that the current administration uses to castigate those who have followed the rules, taken risks and profited from their investments ("A man out of tune with the times," Jan. 22). Mr. Rodricks shows he has drunk the Democratic Kool-Aid by implying that Mr. Romney is part of a movement by the rich to regain the presidency.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
NAME: Moose BREED: English Mastiff AGE: Nine HOME: Reisterstown OWNER: Martha Frick Symington Sanger “Martie” HOW WE MET: When choosing a pup from a litter of English Mastiffs I knew Moose was meant for me. As if saying “the world is too much with me,” a common feeling for writers such as myself, he was snuggled away between a kitchen wall and the refrigerator, as far as he could get from his rambunctious mates....
EXPLORE
June 14, 2011
Share your good news and events with the community. Contact Laurel Leader editorial assistant Pat Farmer, paf1@patuxent.com , or phone and fax 410-332-6653. Photo exhibit — Hosted by Central Maryland Photographers Guild, opens Fri., June 17, 5 p.m., runs through July 15, Penn Camera, 352 Dormer Ave. Twenty-two photographs selected by outside judges span wide variety of subject areas, from wildlife to portrait photography. CMPG, a local photography group open to all members of community, meets once a month in Marriotsville.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2009
Sue Hart's Towson neighborhood consists of quaint brick rowhouses circa 1947 that appear from the street more cottagelike than the usual two-story Colonial. Narrow in width, these homes are lined up side by side, many behind picket or chain-link fences. Front yards, almost as deep as the homes themselves, showcase manicured lawns or are blanketed in controllable ivy. Almost all of the yards are shaded with old trees that were planted as saplings when home construction was completed more than a half-century ago. The concrete walkway to Hart's home passes ivy and small bushes.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2003
When the Tasmanian Devil arrived, the first thing Laraine Harford did was carry him to the kitchen. She gingerly removed the cartoon character cookie jar from its box, pulled off his head and began carefully pouring tap water inside, one measuring cup at a time. At 20 cups, she stopped. Big enough, she thought. She smiled with satisfaction. Her two-year quest was over. Harford poured the water out, let Taz air dry and put him back in his carton. She swathed that with bubble wrap, placed the bundle in a clear plastic bin filled with chunks of shipping foam and snapped the top firmly in place, sliding the bin under the table that holds her African violets.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers Solis-Cohen Enterprises | January 16, 1994
Q: I brought back from Germany after World War II an unmarked pottery beer stein. It has relief decoration of white flowers on a rust-colored background, bands of German writing, and a colorful scene on the front. What's it worth?A: Your German pottery stein with relief and transfer decoration, topped by a pewter "steeple" lid, dates from the early 20th century, and is worth around $50 to $75 in good condition, according to beer-stein authority Gary Kirsner of Gary Kirsner Auctions, P.O. Box 8807, Coral Springs, Fla. 33075, (305)
FEATURES
By Michael & Jane Stern and Michael & Jane Stern,Universal Press Syndicate | December 16, 1990
ISHPEMING, Mich. -- The most requested recipe from our kitchen, especially this time of year, is gingersnaps. We always serve them after dessert at holiday suppers, and on the sideboard for buffets, and they always get eaten up completely, even when we quadruple or sextuple the recipe. On those few occasions when we have guests and don't offer these gingersnaps, we hear nothing but complaints from people who have come to expect them. So now to get those hungry cookie monsters off our backs, and to provide readers with a taste for one of our all-time favorite things to eat, here is the gingersnap recipe once and for all. Try it and see if you don't agree that these uncomplicated cookies are just about perfect.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | November 19, 1998
Need a teapot, a mug, a platter, a vase, a cookie jar, a box? Or, even if you don't actually need any of the above, maybe you'd like to have something, or give something, from the fourth annual Holiday National Invitational Exhibition, called "Winterfest 1998," that just opened at Clayworks.Functional is the hallmark of this show, and the key word is national - the show's 20 ceramics artists hail from as near as Maryland and Virginia, but also as far as Utah, Colorado, Texas, Minnesota and Montana, with North Carolina, Tennessee and New York in between.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 5, 1997
JUDY ROSENBERG has firm ideas about cookies. She believes in using butter, the real unsalted stuff. She preaches the benefits of preheating your oven, and of using baking sheets lined with parchment paper.She has some unflattering things to say about an American institution: the cookie jar. The cookie jar is only good for short-term storage, a day or two, she says. The refrigerator and the freezer are better spots to store cookies.She gave me these cookie tips during a stop in Baltimore to promote her new book, "Rosie's Bakery Chocolate-Packed, Jam-Filled, Butter-Rich, No-Holds-Barred, Cookie Book" (Workman, $13)
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