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November 14, 1990
This year we are holding our own Christmas cookie exchange. Send us a copy of your favorite cookie recipe and the story behind it. We'll run as many of them as we can on Nov. 28. The deadline is Nov. 19.Send your recipes to Sherrie Clinton, Food Editor, The Evening Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md., 21278.* Copies of last year's Christmas Countdown recipes and articles are available on a limited basis. If you would like to receive a booklet containing the entire 12 part series, please send $3 check or money order to: Article Reprints, The Baltimore Sun Public Affairs Dept.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Joan Metcalf from Westminster asked for help finding the recipe for Chocolate Bliss Bites. She had clipped the recipe from the February 2007 issue of Prevention magazine but said she was missing the complete directions. She liked the fact that the cookies had no fat. Herb Rosenberg from North Babylon, N.Y., found the very recipe that Metcalf was looking for on the Prevention magazine website (recipes.prevention.com/recipe/chocolate-bliss-cookies.aspx). These gems are incredibly easy to make and taste like rich little brownie bites but are made with zero fat. It's probably a good thing that the recipe only makes 24 because their rich flavor makes them irresistible.
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | October 16, 1996
Get ready for cookie exchange seasonCalling all holiday bakers: Submit your favorite cookie recipes to the second annual A La Carte cookie exchange. We're looking for unusual, festive cookies that will make holiday tables sparkle. Send recipes by Nov. 6 to Holiday Cookies, c/o Karol V. Menzie, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278. Selected entries will appear in this section in early December. A host of previously rare spices are finding their way to U.S. markets, thanks to consumer demand and better availability, according to Ann Wilder of Vann's Spices, Towson.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | November 28, 2007
It's one thing to win that coveted title of Top Chef. It's another when you're back to compete against the winners from past seasons, each eager to claim ultimate bragging rights. So instead of looking for new reader recipes for Taste's annual reader cookie exchange this year, we decided to step back and savor the delicious fruits of the recent past. Just since the year 2000, we've vetted and tested our way through hundreds of solicited recipes to give you the goods on about 75 favorite holiday cookies.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | October 30, 1996
Produce bags are a little spaceyWhen their produce-protecting bags kept vanishing off store shelves in east-central Florida, officials at Evert-fresh were puzzled. Then the bag-maker got a call from NASA. Seems the folks at the space agency had been testing the bags for possible use on the space shuttle: Could they buy a couple of cases?The bags are a made of oya, a natural mineral that absorbs and removes ethylene gas, which causes deterioration in produce. For a sample of the bags, send $15 for three 10-bag packages (small, medium and large)
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | October 23, 1996
Pasta with claws for celebrationIt's a whole new way for Marylanders to get crabby: with Louie the Crab pasta from Buckeye Beans and Herbs of Spokane, Wash. The new product was inspired by Melissa Fulton, proprietor of Celebrate Maryland! shops and Just Plane Crabs at BWI. The red crab shapes are packaged with small white shell shapes. You can find them at Fulton's shops, or call (800) 449-2121 and get Buckeye's Home on the Ranch catalog. If the thought of fresh-baked pumpkin bread, apple cider, and Marzetti's new peanut butter and fat-free caramel apple dips makes you hungry, head for Graul's market in Ruxton on Saturday.
NEWS
October 11, 2001
An interview with Donna Lyman, a member of Whetstone Women's Book Group. Where does the title "Whetstone" come from? It's the name of our street. It's an old street in Columbia, and the neighborhood is old, and it has a mixture of new and old residents. ... For Christmas, the women get together and have a cookie exchange, and the book club grew out of a conversation at the cookie exchange. What book are members reading this month? This month, we're reading Agate Nesaule's book, A Woman in Amber.
FEATURES
October 15, 1997
We know, we know, it isn't even Halloween yet. But readers are already calling to ask if The Sun is having its holiday cookie exchange this year. Indeed we are, and we need your most treasured recipes to share with other bakers.Here are the guidelines:* We're looking for festive and, above all, delicious cookies.* Type your recipe, double spaced, or print clearly. Please be very specific with measurements, ingredients and directions.* Tell us how many cookies it makes.* Include your name, address, phone number and a sentence or two about yourself or your recipe.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | October 29, 1997
Sweet gifts and a coffee breakLisa Anne's Toffee Apples Sweet and Gift Shoppe will open Saturday at 2121 N. Charles St. -- but just until Christmas Eve. You'll be able to buy gourmet foods and knickknacks separately or create themed gift baskets. Stop in for dessert and coffee. Hours will be Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., with extended hours after Thanksgiving.Hampden cuisineSixteen Hampden chefs will present their signature dishes at "A Taste of Hampden," a benefit for the Hampden Family Center, Nov. 6 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at 1104 W. 36th St. Rotunda Wine & Spirits will be providing wine and nonalcoholic drinks.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2002
Come December, groups of friends, colleagues and relatives gather to share the fruits of many kitchens, divvying up dozens of homemade gingerbreads, bars, drops and jumbles for each participant's respective household and gift list. While the holiday cookie exchange has become an increasingly popular tradition, it appears to have no specific point of origin. "My suspicion is that cookie exchanges have been happening unofficially within families for generations," says Lucy Long, chairwoman of the foodways section of the American Folklore Society and assistant professor of popular culture at Bowling Green State University.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | December 17, 2006
A woman dips pale macaroons in dark chocolate while her friend nearby drizzles white chocolate on the fudge cookies. At the other end of the huge kitchen, two teenage boys argue over the amount of flour landing on the table instead of in the commercial mixer, while across the table their mothers dump chocolate chips and chopped walnuts into a whirling bowl of coffee-flavored batter. All the while, people scurry toward the sinks to wash dirty utensils. They head every which way to and from bins of flour as they avoid other bakers piling oversize cookie sheets on an eyeball-high rack.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 22, 2004
TRADITION IS important at this time of year, and Rick Vohrer has decided to start a new one. He is organizing a holiday beer exchange with his buddies. Called something like Rick's 1st Annual Beer and Stogie Exchange, it will, he thinks, become the male equivalent of a ladies' holiday cookie exchange. Rick knows about such Christmas cookie exchange parties. For years his wife, Sue, has held one in the couple's Cockeysville home for her female friends. Rick usually made a brief appearance.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | December 3, 2003
We asked for your best cookie recipes, and you gave them to us -- more than 130 of your favorites. After a good bit of debate and a frantic weekend of baking, we chose winners in six categories: best bar, drop, rolled, quick and classic cookies, and best cookie to give. We then invited three professional bakers -- cookbook authors Elinor Klivans and Nancy Baggett, and Phoenix cooking instructor Maria Springer -- to give us their best recipes in the same categories. You can decide whether you think the amateurs or the professionals had the best cookies.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2002
Come December, groups of friends, colleagues and relatives gather to share the fruits of many kitchens, divvying up dozens of homemade gingerbreads, bars, drops and jumbles for each participant's respective household and gift list. While the holiday cookie exchange has become an increasingly popular tradition, it appears to have no specific point of origin. "My suspicion is that cookie exchanges have been happening unofficially within families for generations," says Lucy Long, chairwoman of the foodways section of the American Folklore Society and assistant professor of popular culture at Bowling Green State University.
NEWS
October 11, 2001
An interview with Donna Lyman, a member of Whetstone Women's Book Group. Where does the title "Whetstone" come from? It's the name of our street. It's an old street in Columbia, and the neighborhood is old, and it has a mixture of new and old residents. ... For Christmas, the women get together and have a cookie exchange, and the book club grew out of a conversation at the cookie exchange. What book are members reading this month? This month, we're reading Agate Nesaule's book, A Woman in Amber.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | October 29, 1997
Sweet gifts and a coffee breakLisa Anne's Toffee Apples Sweet and Gift Shoppe will open Saturday at 2121 N. Charles St. -- but just until Christmas Eve. You'll be able to buy gourmet foods and knickknacks separately or create themed gift baskets. Stop in for dessert and coffee. Hours will be Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., with extended hours after Thanksgiving.Hampden cuisineSixteen Hampden chefs will present their signature dishes at "A Taste of Hampden," a benefit for the Hampden Family Center, Nov. 6 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at 1104 W. 36th St. Rotunda Wine & Spirits will be providing wine and nonalcoholic drinks.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 22, 2004
TRADITION IS important at this time of year, and Rick Vohrer has decided to start a new one. He is organizing a holiday beer exchange with his buddies. Called something like Rick's 1st Annual Beer and Stogie Exchange, it will, he thinks, become the male equivalent of a ladies' holiday cookie exchange. Rick knows about such Christmas cookie exchange parties. For years his wife, Sue, has held one in the couple's Cockeysville home for her female friends. Rick usually made a brief appearance.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | December 17, 2006
A woman dips pale macaroons in dark chocolate while her friend nearby drizzles white chocolate on the fudge cookies. At the other end of the huge kitchen, two teenage boys argue over the amount of flour landing on the table instead of in the commercial mixer, while across the table their mothers dump chocolate chips and chopped walnuts into a whirling bowl of coffee-flavored batter. All the while, people scurry toward the sinks to wash dirty utensils. They head every which way to and from bins of flour as they avoid other bakers piling oversize cookie sheets on an eyeball-high rack.
FEATURES
October 15, 1997
We know, we know, it isn't even Halloween yet. But readers are already calling to ask if The Sun is having its holiday cookie exchange this year. Indeed we are, and we need your most treasured recipes to share with other bakers.Here are the guidelines:* We're looking for festive and, above all, delicious cookies.* Type your recipe, double spaced, or print clearly. Please be very specific with measurements, ingredients and directions.* Tell us how many cookies it makes.* Include your name, address, phone number and a sentence or two about yourself or your recipe.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
Holidays are coming, heralded by carols, candles -- and, of course, cookies.Perhaps no other season is more associated with festive platters of sweet baked goods, and most families have their traditional favorites.When we asked home bakers to send us recipes for their favorite holiday treats for our second annual "Holiday Cookie Exchange," we got dozens, from pumpkin chocolate chip cookies to chocolate "devil dogs." Volunteer testers baked the most unusual ones, and in informal tastings, we selected a wide range of favorites.
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