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By Bob Allen and Bob Allen,Special to the Sun | November 9, 1990
It could be argued that Conway Twitty, popularizer of such classics as "Hello Darlin' " and "It's Only Make Believe," is country music's most celebrated and durable journeyman.Mr. Twitty, who appears tomorrow at the Baltimore Arena, doesn't possess the great vocal chops of George Jones, or the soulful songwriting genius of Willie Nelson. And, quite frankly, there's often been as much formula as art to his music.Yet, by dint of his firm grasp of his audience's expectations and his sheer capacity for hard work, Mr. Twitty has outperformed all of the above-mentioned legends in the record charts.
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By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2004
Dolly, Minnie, Hank Sr. and Conway wowed Carroll seniors yesterday during a lively country and bluegrass performance at the annual Carroll County 4-H/FFA Fair's Senior Citizen Day. Ed Bulson and Nancy Taylor - aka Just Us - portrayed the country music legends as they entertained about 100 senior citizens, as well as Bureau of Aging personnel, who watched the hour-and-a-half concert while eating cake and ice cream. As Conway Twitty, Bulson drew cheers and applause when he flirted with 85-year-old Olive Fisher and her sister, Sarah Zentgraf, 87, both of Westminster.
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NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2004
Dolly, Minnie, Hank Sr. and Conway wowed Carroll seniors yesterday during a lively country and bluegrass performance at the annual Carroll County 4-H/FFA Fair's Senior Citizen Day. Ed Bulson and Nancy Taylor - aka Just Us - portrayed the country music legends as they entertained about 100 senior citizens, as well as Bureau of Aging personnel, who watched the hour-and-a-half concert while eating cake and ice cream. As Conway Twitty, Bulson drew cheers and applause when he flirted with 85-year-old Olive Fisher and her sister, Sarah Zentgraf, 87, both of Westminster.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2004
Dolly, Minnie, Hank Sr. and Conway wowed Carroll seniors yesterday during a lively country and bluegrass performance at the annual Carroll County 4-H/FFA Fair's Senior Citizen Day. Ed Bulson and Nancy Taylor - aka Just Us - portrayed the country music legends as they entertained about 100 senior citizens, as well as Bureau of Aging personnel, who watched the hour-and-a-half concert while eating cake and ice cream. As Conway Twitty, Bulson drew cheers and applause when he flirted with 85-year-old Olive Fisher and her sister, Sarah Zentgraf, 87, both of Westminster.
FEATURES
By Bob Allen and Bob Allen,Special to The Evening Sun | November 12, 1990
GEORGE JONES, Merle Haggard, and Conway Twitty, the three country artists who shared the bill at the Baltimore Arena Saturday night, all have one thing in common besides being three of the most recognizable names in the business:Both in terms of record sales and creative output, all three are presently in that uneasy free-fall zone between superstar and legend. Though each is still present on the country charts, they no longer dominate as they once did.George Jones, considered by many to be country music's most gifted vocalist, opened the show.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2004
Dolly, Minnie, Hank Sr. and Conway wowed Carroll seniors yesterday during a lively country and bluegrass performance at the annual Carroll County 4-H/FFA Fair's Senior Citizen Day. Ed Bulson and Nancy Taylor - aka Just Us - portrayed the country music legends as they entertained about 100 senior citizens, as well as Bureau of Aging personnel, who watched the hour-and-a-half concert while eating cake and ice cream. As Conway Twitty, Bulson drew cheers and applause when he flirted with 85-year-old Olive Fisher and her sister, Sarah Zentgraf, 87, both of Westminster.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 7, 1993
Most singers count themselves lucky to have had even a single stab at success. But Conway Twitty, who died Saturday of heart failure at age 59, hit the jackpot not once but twice -- first as a rock singer, then as a country star.Although he had grown up with country music, by the time Twitty got out of the Army he wanted to rock. Awed by the adrenalin and excitement being injected onto vinyl by the likes of Elvis Presley and Carl Perkins, he took his band, the Rockhousers, to Sun Studios in Memphis in 1956, hoping to cash in.Unfortunately, the closest he got to recording for Sun was when Roy Orbison agreed to cut "Rockhouse" -- Twitty's band's theme -- as his second Sun single.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1990
The scariest part of being a fledgling pop musician is the fea of tomorrow.Where is next gig? Will I make enough money to buy food and pay the rent? Will I ever get a record contract?All of these questions and many more have been asked by asuperb pop band from Vermont called The Boyz.The trio has been together for nearly eight years and, as truth would have it, are no longer boys but young men."Sometimes it's hard to be optimistic but we don't let it get to us," guitarist Mark Bowie said of the band's struggle to get a major recording deal.
NEWS
April 11, 2000
Helen Ratnoff Plotz, 87, who earned praise for compiling and editing almost a score of anthologies of poetry, mostly for young adults, died March 30 at her home in Brooklyn, N.Y. Her anthologies include "The Gift Outright: America and her Poets" (1977) and "Untune the Sky: Poems of Music and the Dance" (1957). Richard Jackson "Jack" Nance, 64, who wrote songs for Conway Twitty, played with Elvis Presley, and worked with the Rolling Stones and Michael Jackson, died Friday of lung cancer in Nashville, Tenn.
NEWS
April 11, 1997
Mae Boren Axton,82, who co-wrote the Elvis Presley hit "Heartbreak Hotel" and was the mother of singer-songwriter Hoyt Axton, died Wednesday in Nashville, Tenn. Her songs were recorded by such country stars as Patsy Cline, Faron Young, Conway Twitty and Hank Snow.She also was widely known in Nashville as a guardian angel to struggling songwriters and musicians, helping to find them a record or publishing deal.Among those she helped early in their careers were Willie Nelson, Dolly Parton and Mel Tillis.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 7, 1993
Most singers count themselves lucky to have had even a single stab at success. But Conway Twitty, who died Saturday of heart failure at age 59, hit the jackpot not once but twice -- first as a rock singer, then as a country star.Although he had grown up with country music, by the time Twitty got out of the Army he wanted to rock. Awed by the adrenalin and excitement being injected onto vinyl by the likes of Elvis Presley and Carl Perkins, he took his band, the Rockhousers, to Sun Studios in Memphis in 1956, hoping to cash in.Unfortunately, the closest he got to recording for Sun was when Roy Orbison agreed to cut "Rockhouse" -- Twitty's band's theme -- as his second Sun single.
FEATURES
By Bob Allen and Bob Allen,Special to The Evening Sun | November 12, 1990
GEORGE JONES, Merle Haggard, and Conway Twitty, the three country artists who shared the bill at the Baltimore Arena Saturday night, all have one thing in common besides being three of the most recognizable names in the business:Both in terms of record sales and creative output, all three are presently in that uneasy free-fall zone between superstar and legend. Though each is still present on the country charts, they no longer dominate as they once did.George Jones, considered by many to be country music's most gifted vocalist, opened the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bob Allen and Bob Allen,Special to the Sun | November 9, 1990
It could be argued that Conway Twitty, popularizer of such classics as "Hello Darlin' " and "It's Only Make Believe," is country music's most celebrated and durable journeyman.Mr. Twitty, who appears tomorrow at the Baltimore Arena, doesn't possess the great vocal chops of George Jones, or the soulful songwriting genius of Willie Nelson. And, quite frankly, there's often been as much formula as art to his music.Yet, by dint of his firm grasp of his audience's expectations and his sheer capacity for hard work, Mr. Twitty has outperformed all of the above-mentioned legends in the record charts.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1990
The scariest part of being a fledgling pop musician is the fea of tomorrow.Where is next gig? Will I make enough money to buy food and pay the rent? Will I ever get a record contract?All of these questions and many more have been asked by asuperb pop band from Vermont called The Boyz.The trio has been together for nearly eight years and, as truth would have it, are no longer boys but young men."Sometimes it's hard to be optimistic but we don't let it get to us," guitarist Mark Bowie said of the band's struggle to get a major recording deal.
NEWS
February 26, 1993
Toy CaldwellMarshall Tucker BandSPARTANBURG, S.C. -- Toy T. Caldwell Jr., former lead guitar player and singer for the Marshall Tucker Band, died yesterday, and the cause was under investigation, a coroner said.Mr. Caldwell's body was found by his wife, Abbie Good Caldwell, at their home in Moore, about 80 miles northwest of Columbia, said Bill Doble, vice president of music for Cabin Fever Entertainment, for whom Mr. Caldwell recorded. Mr. Doble said Mr. Caldwell, 45, had been ill with influenza and bronchitis.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | October 18, 1990
MANY IN THE country music industry were shocked -- and a couple even outraged -- that Randy Travis was shut out at the Country Music Awards last week in Nashville.Up for entertainer of the year for the fourth time, Travis, who hosted the show with Reba McIntyre on NBC, was once again snubbed in favor of George Strait.But to hear the ever-humble Travis tell it, he won't lose any sleep over something he never had."Awards are a funny thing because you always feel great if you win one but you never seem to feel too awful when you don't," Travis says.
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