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Convicted Of Drunken

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NEWS
February 5, 1998
A Hampstead man was convicted of drunken driving and two counts of assault after pleading not guilty in Carroll County Circuit Court Tuesday.Michael O. Mehaffie, 26, agreed not to challenge the prosecutor's statement of facts. Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. set sentencing for March 25.According to court records, Mehaffie became angry when a woman he met in a bar late on Aug. 17 refused to ride home with him after he drove her to the home of a friend, Sean E. Seets, in a Hampstead mobile home park about 2 a.m. on Aug. 18.Seets and his roommate, Robert M. Vicera, tried to calm Mehaffie, but he drove his car at Seets, striking him and flipping him into the air. Seets was not seriously injured.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
The civil rights director for the state attorney general's office was convicted Friday of driving while impaired, but the sentence for Carl O. Snowden remained the same as before an illegal disposition was tossed out last month. "An appeal will be filed," Snowden said after leaving the courtroom, where Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Ronald A. Silkworth changed the initial outcome for the drunken-driving charge. In November, Snowden, 57, received probation before judgment on a drunken-driving charge from the previous June.
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NEWS
April 17, 1997
The Court of Appeals has suspended the law license of a Catonsville lawyer who ignored a judge's order to report to a detention facility after being convicted of drunken driving.Thomas A. Garland was suspended indefinitely yesterday for not showing up at the Prince George's County D.W.I. Detention Center to serve a 33-day sentence for driving while intoxicated in 1993. He was arrested in August 1992 by a Howard County police officer who found him passed out at the wheel of his car. He had crossed the center line of a highway, had alcohol on his breath and a flat tire.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2002
Beginning next month, a new Maryland law will force anyone convicted of drunken driving twice within five years to install ignition interlocks that require a puff of alcohol-free breath to start a vehicle's engine. The law requires a one-year mandatory license suspension before repeat offenders can even drive with an interlock, which must be used for a year. The law takes effect Sept. 30. It was passed by this year's Maryland General Assembly and signed into law in the spring by Gov. Parris N. Glendening.
NEWS
November 26, 1997
A Hampstead woman who was convicted of drunken driving in August was granted probation before judgment yesterday and ordered to perform 50 hours of community service within six months.Kelly M. Staub, 20, of the 4300 block of Downhill Trail was arrested on Watertank Road about 2 a.m. Nov. 30.After she failed field sobriety tests, her blood alcohol content was measured at 0.12 percent. The state threshold for drunken driving is 0.08 percent.Carroll County Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. noted Staub's unblemished criminal and driving record before ordering two years of unsupervised probation.
NEWS
October 23, 1997
A Baltimore man was sentenced yesterday to eight months in the Carroll County Detention Center for walking out of Wal-Mart in Westminster with a $100 calculator and for assault.Michael E. Rogers, 34, pleaded guilty in August to theft under $300 and assault.According to court records, Rogers assaulted a security employee who confronted him in the parking lot after he left the store in the 200 block of Woodward Drive about 2: 15 p.m. Nov. 16.Circuit Judge Francis M. Arnold imposed eight months on the theft count and a consecutive six months for the assault.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | February 26, 1992
Mothers Against Drunk Driving spoke at a hearing Tuesday to support a Carroll delegate's bill aimed at toughening restrictions for previously convicted drunken drivers.Del. Richard C. Matthews, R-Carroll, is hoping a few key adjustments to two drunken-driving measures will help their passage in the House Judiciary Committee, which has rejected both bills for the last three years.The testimony of MADD's Maryland chapter could help the bill, which would require courts to place an alcohol restriction on the license of any driver convicted of a second or subsequent alcohol-related driving offense, said Matthews.
NEWS
October 13, 1997
NEWS REPORTS carry enough horror stories about drunken driving to make any thinking person pause before getting behind the wheel while intoxicated. But how do you reach an incorrigible alcoholic who does not think before driving?No one reached Charles H. Sexton, of Woodbine, who was driving along a western Howard County road last March to a carryout shop with his mother and 11-year-old nephew. He was drunk to start with and was getting more intoxicated as he consumed beer along the way.Sexton, 48, rammed his car into a utility pole.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg | January 17, 1991
Since 1986, some 14,500 people have been arrested for drunken driving in Baltimore County. Of those, 3,500 were arrested more than once, and of those, the Baltimore County police have culled the names of 39 who form an elite of sorts: all have been convicted of drunken driving three times or more in the last five years.And now, the county police say, each time one of those 39 gets behind the wheel of a car, a police officer might be watching.Since the first of the year, the police have begun a new repeat-offender program that will for the first time target the 39 people for periodic surveillance and to make sure that they adhere to court-ordered restrictions.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2002
Beginning next month, a new Maryland law will force anyone convicted of drunken driving twice within five years to install ignition interlocks that require a puff of alcohol-free breath to start a vehicle's engine. The law requires a one-year mandatory license suspension before repeat offenders can even drive with an interlock, which must be used for a year. The law takes effect Sept. 30. It was passed by this year's Maryland General Assembly and signed into law in the spring by Gov. Parris N. Glendening.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2002
Beginning next month, a new Maryland law will force anyone convicted of drunken driving twice within five years to install ignition interlocks that require a puff of alcohol-free breath to start a vehicle's engine. The law requires a one-year mandatory license suspension before repeat offenders can drive with an interlock, which must be used for a year. The law takes effect Sept. 30. It was passed by this year's Maryland General Assembly and signed into law in the spring by Gov. Parris N. Glendening.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1998
A former Taneytown woman who served 10 months in jail for suffocating her 4-month-old daughter in 1996 was convicted in Towson District Court yesterday of drunken driving.Lisa E. Ruby, 21, of Westminster was sentenced to 63 days in jail, the time she has been incarcerated since her arrest on Dec. 16, prosecutors said.Ruby was immediately returned to the Carroll County Detention Center to be held without bail pending charges that she violated the terms of probation stemming from her 1997 conviction in the death of Tabitha Meekins.
NEWS
February 5, 1998
A Hampstead man was convicted of drunken driving and two counts of assault after pleading not guilty in Carroll County Circuit Court Tuesday.Michael O. Mehaffie, 26, agreed not to challenge the prosecutor's statement of facts. Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. set sentencing for March 25.According to court records, Mehaffie became angry when a woman he met in a bar late on Aug. 17 refused to ride home with him after he drove her to the home of a friend, Sean E. Seets, in a Hampstead mobile home park about 2 a.m. on Aug. 18.Seets and his roommate, Robert M. Vicera, tried to calm Mehaffie, but he drove his car at Seets, striking him and flipping him into the air. Seets was not seriously injured.
NEWS
November 26, 1997
A Hampstead woman who was convicted of drunken driving in August was granted probation before judgment yesterday and ordered to perform 50 hours of community service within six months.Kelly M. Staub, 20, of the 4300 block of Downhill Trail was arrested on Watertank Road about 2 a.m. Nov. 30.After she failed field sobriety tests, her blood alcohol content was measured at 0.12 percent. The state threshold for drunken driving is 0.08 percent.Carroll County Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. noted Staub's unblemished criminal and driving record before ordering two years of unsupervised probation.
NEWS
October 23, 1997
A Baltimore man was sentenced yesterday to eight months in the Carroll County Detention Center for walking out of Wal-Mart in Westminster with a $100 calculator and for assault.Michael E. Rogers, 34, pleaded guilty in August to theft under $300 and assault.According to court records, Rogers assaulted a security employee who confronted him in the parking lot after he left the store in the 200 block of Woodward Drive about 2: 15 p.m. Nov. 16.Circuit Judge Francis M. Arnold imposed eight months on the theft count and a consecutive six months for the assault.
NEWS
October 13, 1997
NEWS REPORTS carry enough horror stories about drunken driving to make any thinking person pause before getting behind the wheel while intoxicated. But how do you reach an incorrigible alcoholic who does not think before driving?No one reached Charles H. Sexton, of Woodbine, who was driving along a western Howard County road last March to a carryout shop with his mother and 11-year-old nephew. He was drunk to start with and was getting more intoxicated as he consumed beer along the way.Sexton, 48, rammed his car into a utility pole.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | October 31, 1993
Dr. Saleem A. Shah, a psychologist killed by a drunken driver last November, believed that the law needs to take behavioral science into account, that rehabilitation is more valuable than incarceration.That was a difficult philosophy for Dr. Shah's survivors to accept at Friday's sentencing of the man responsible for his death and who had previously been convicted of drunken driving.District Judge Lenore R. Gelfman sentenced William Scott Marcellino, 31, of the 19100 block of Grotto Lane, in Germantown, to a four-year prison term with all but 18 months suspended, three years of probation and 1,248 hours of community service.
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | October 13, 1991
Bob Kirkland is the kind of guy people just can't say enough good things about.He is known for helping people change their lives. Hisjob is helping alcoholics and drug addicts stay sober and out of trouble. County judges, his co-workers and clients say Kirkland does hisjob well.Kirkland, 49, heads the Carroll Drunk Driving Monitor Program. His job is to help drunken-driving convicts stick to the terms of theirprobation by having them report to his office once a week.A defendant who is convicted of drunken driving often is sent by a judge tothe county Health Department to be evaluated.
NEWS
April 17, 1997
The Court of Appeals has suspended the law license of a Catonsville lawyer who ignored a judge's order to report to a detention facility after being convicted of drunken driving.Thomas A. Garland was suspended indefinitely yesterday for not showing up at the Prince George's County D.W.I. Detention Center to serve a 33-day sentence for driving while intoxicated in 1993. He was arrested in August 1992 by a Howard County police officer who found him passed out at the wheel of his car. He had crossed the center line of a highway, had alcohol on his breath and a flat tire.
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