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By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
A Baltimore-based temporary staffing agency faces a $6,000 fine in connection with the death of an employee, who was killed last December after being crushed by a conveyor system at an Amazon fulfillment center in New Jersey. Abacus - The Corporate Services Co., Baltimore, which employed temporary worker Ronald Smith, and three other temp agencies failed to conduct assessments of the safety hazards at the Avenel plant before assigning workers, according to U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
A Baltimore-based temporary staffing agency faces a $6,000 fine in connection with the death of an employee, who was killed last December after being crushed by a conveyor system at an Amazon fulfillment center in New Jersey. Abacus - The Corporate Services Co., Baltimore, which employed temporary worker Ronald Smith, and three other temp agencies failed to conduct assessments of the safety hazards at the Avenel plant before assigning workers, according to U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
For nearly a century, Carroll County's smallest town has supplied stone to the massive Lehigh Cement Co. plant that employs many in the community. But the company finds itself at a crossroads — with the quarry nearly depleted, it is eyeing a new supply from a limestone-rich mine that it owns in another town. The company's plan: Construct a 4.5-mile conveyor system that would run under roads, rails and streams — and over acres of protected farmland between the quarry and the plant in Union Bridge.
NEWS
By Lenny Siegel | September 25, 2013
Globally, chemical weapons demilitarization has been difficult, slow and costly, but with technologies that have been developed over the past two decades, the safe destruction of Syria's chemical weapons stockpile is feasible. While the diplomats work out the principles for sequestering and eliminating Syrian chemical warfare materiel, our government and others should be developing a strategy for safe, secure demilitarization. That work must begin now, not only because it will take time, but also because it is likely to raise issues that the diplomats will need to resolve.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2003
Keith Warner remembers the last time he took a load of soybeans from his farm in western Carroll County to the port of Baltimore. He spent eight hours in a line of more than 80 trucks, waiting to unload at a barge terminal. "Farmers don't want to get backed up like that," he says. "They have to get back to work on the farm, not wasting a day." But Warner no longer frets about lost productivity, long waits or trekking miles to Baltimore. He's found a better way to get his soybeans to market - and farmers from as far away as Virginia now bring their crops to him. With a rail line running through his 1,500-acre farm in Keymar and the fertilizer and seed company that he operates there, Warner only had to install a $55,000 conveyor system to get another business off the ground.
NEWS
By Lenny Siegel | September 25, 2013
Globally, chemical weapons demilitarization has been difficult, slow and costly, but with technologies that have been developed over the past two decades, the safe destruction of Syria's chemical weapons stockpile is feasible. While the diplomats work out the principles for sequestering and eliminating Syrian chemical warfare materiel, our government and others should be developing a strategy for safe, secure demilitarization. That work must begin now, not only because it will take time, but also because it is likely to raise issues that the diplomats will need to resolve.
NEWS
June 25, 1993
Fire destroys barn, calvesA fire destroyed a barn in the Lisbon area Wednesday !B evening, killing three calves and causing $106,000 damage, fire and rescue officials said.Fire units from Howard, Montgomery and Carroll counties responded to the fire at 6:42 p.m. Calves and cows were rescued from the burning 60-by-80-foot barn, officials said.The barn was next to the Lisbon Fire Department in the 1300 block of Route 94. Fire officials are investigating whether the fire may have been started by a conveyor system inside the barn.
NEWS
June 25, 1993
County firefighters respond to blaze at barn in HowardCarroll firefighters helped battle a fire that destroyed a barn just south of the Carroll-Howard county line Wednesday evening, Howard fire and rescue officials said.Three calves were killed, and damage was estimated at $106,000.Fire units from Howard and Montgomery counties also responded to the fire at about 6:42 p.m. Calves and cows were rescued from the burning 60-by-80-foot barn, officials said.The barn was next to the Lisbon Fire Department in the 1300 block of Route 94. Fire officials are investigating whether the fire may have been started by a barn conveyor system.
NEWS
July 13, 2006
OSHA investigates city plant worker's death The Maryland Occupation, Safety and Health Administration is investigating the death Tuesday of an assistant plant manager of a South Baltimore contracting firm after he became trapped inside a conveyor machine, city police said. Raymond Lawrence Walk, 39, of the 8000 block of Wynbrook Road in North Point was performing routine maintenance work about 2 p.m. on a conveyor machine at P. Flanigan & Sons, in the 2100 block of Annapolis Road in Westport, when he became trapped and suffered head injuries, police said.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1999
Authorities across the mid-Atlantic region have a digital mystery on their hands: the source of a severed finger that turned up in a bag of potting soil packaged in Maryland.The finger startled a New Jersey gardener on Memorial Day, prompting a call to her local police and detective work tracing the bag to its Delaware supplier and the company's packaging plant in Wicomico County."We've been in business for 14 years, and this is the first time we've ever gotten any notoriety," said Steve Liffers, vice president of sales and marketing for Coastal Supply Co., a garden products business in Dagsboro, Del.Liffers, at the request of police in Hopewell Township, N.J., searched three years of medical records at Coastal Supply and was sure the finger did not belong to any current or former employee.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
For nearly a century, Carroll County's smallest town has supplied stone to the massive Lehigh Cement Co. plant that employs many in the community. But the company finds itself at a crossroads — with the quarry nearly depleted, it is eyeing a new supply from a limestone-rich mine that it owns in another town. The company's plan: Construct a 4.5-mile conveyor system that would run under roads, rails and streams — and over acres of protected farmland between the quarry and the plant in Union Bridge.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2003
Keith Warner remembers the last time he took a load of soybeans from his farm in western Carroll County to the port of Baltimore. He spent eight hours in a line of more than 80 trucks, waiting to unload at a barge terminal. "Farmers don't want to get backed up like that," he says. "They have to get back to work on the farm, not wasting a day." But Warner no longer frets about lost productivity, long waits or trekking miles to Baltimore. He's found a better way to get his soybeans to market - and farmers from as far away as Virginia now bring their crops to him. With a rail line running through his 1,500-acre farm in Keymar and the fertilizer and seed company that he operates there, Warner only had to install a $55,000 conveyor system to get another business off the ground.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2003
Keith Warner remembers the last time he took a load of soybeans from his farm in western Carroll County to the port of Baltimore. He spent eight hours in a line of more than 80 trucks, waiting to unload at a barge terminal. "Farmers don't want to get backed up like that," he says. "They have to get back to work on the farm, not wasting a day." But Warner no longer frets about lost productivity, long waits or trekking miles to Baltimore. He's found a better way to get his soybeans to market -- and farmers from as far away as Virginia now bring their crops to him. With a rail line running through his 1,500-acre farm in Keymar and the fertilizer and seed company that he operates there, Warner only had to install a $55,000 conveyor system to get another business off the ground.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2012
Several flights were delayed at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport Sunday morning when a false fire alarm automatically shut down the baggage area for Southwest Airlines, one of the airport's largest carriers, officials said. While authorities ultimately determined there was no fire on the conveyor belt system that transports baggage, the delay from the alarm and investigation caused some complications for travelers during the busy year-end holiday season. "It did cause a little bit of the delay.
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