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October 19, 2012
What a superb idea it is to monitor conversations on buses! ("MTA is recording bus conversations," Oct. 18.) Everyone understands that the kind of people who ride buses can't be trusted. The shame is that we haven't yet carried the idea far enough. Obviously, if the kind of people who ride buses should be monitored, we should also monitor those who ride light rail. And people who ride in airplanes can't be trusted, as 9/11 and numerous hijackings have demonstrated. In fact, security measures in airports would be greatly helped if we recorded all the conversations in airports, and, of course, we should extend the policies to trains and train stations.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 4, 2014
College freshmen are completing their first month on campus. According to the website  The Other Freshman 15 , "The first 15 weeks of college can be the riskiest for sexual assault. ... One out of five students experience rape or sexual assault while they are in college, and in the great majority of cases (75-80 percent), the victim knows the attacker. " The  Washington Post  recently carried a front-page story about campus sexual assaults. As the father of former college students, two of whom are daughters, I was stunned by the presumptions in the story.
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 24, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Does it ever seem like almost everyone on television has had a shot at being host of a talk show? Chevy Chase is the latest, now preparing a show for the Fox network. But here's a vote for Burt Reynolds getting one.The star of CBS' "Evening Shade" has another good outing as an occasional chatmeister tonight, on "Burt Reynolds' Conversations With . . . The Ladies of Country Music" (at 10 o'clock, Channel 11).Viewers who saw Reynolds' first "Conversations With . . . " special last fall, with Hollywood legends June Alyson, Jane Powell, Ginger Rogers and Esther Williams, might agree the star has a surprisingly easy-going style that elicits something rare on talk TV: genuine conversation, as opposed to plugs, bits of comedy acts and other obviously prepared material.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
I love Sunday morning public affairs TV, and I had a chance today to be part of an animated discussion about why the public hates the press. Here's the video from "Media Buzz" with me and Mediaite columnist Joe Concha as guests, and Howie Kurtz as host. I love the statistic Concha brought to the table about three out of four Americans trusting the press 40 years ago versus the shameful lack of credibility today. And when I find a way to go off on Chelsea Clinton and NBC News at about the five minutes mark, I want it duly noted that Kurtz introduced the topic - not me. (But I thank him for it.)
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
A bill to ban the Maryland Transit Administration's practice of recording conversations on its buses has been filed by two state senators. James Brochin, a Baltimore County Democrat, and Allan Kittleman, a Republican representing Howard and Carroll counties, want the MTA to stop installing microphones and deactivate units in use by Oct. 1. "I have spoken to the MTA, and I have a philosophical difference with them," said Brochin. "What I discuss on the bus is nobody's business but my own. " Agency spokesman Terry Owens said the recordings give police additional assistance to investigate incidents and are not being used for surveillance.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | November 26, 1992
One night while working the late shift in a newborn ward of Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, Ed Walczak kept tally: six s-words, three f-words, one a and one b.These were the obscenities he overheard a group of co-workers use in their private conversations about football, the election and the weather."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 30, 2002
PARIS - Italian and German investigators have disclosed new information that hints of an attack involving aircraft and the United States were more widespread among European law enforcement agencies before Sept. 11 than previously suspected. A Central Intelligence Agency spokesman said yesterday that before Sept. 11 the Federal Bureau of Investigation had been given only a rough summary of the intercepts by Italian officials and that neither the CIA nor the FBI had been warned of specific threats mentioning the United States.
FEATURES
By Lisa Anderson and Lisa Anderson,Chicago Tribune | November 7, 1991
NEW YORK -- A windless day, sunny and mild, like those rare ones in October when Manhattan sheds its pollution and shines with an autumn brilliance, would be the perfect cue. The call would come. The summons would be simple: "Let's trot."The summoner was the legendary Greta Garbo, phoning from her fifth-floor riverview apartment at 450 E. 52nd St. The summoned was Raymond Daum, her friend and neighbor around the corner on Beekman Place.And for 20 years, three times a week, "Miss G," the reclusiveformer actress, and "Mr. Daum," the gregarious film scholar and TV producer for the United Nations, walked and talked around Manhattan.
NEWS
September 19, 2013
I thought it was illegal to record conversations in Maryland. If not, I think that police wearing cameras is a good idea, but only if all police, including the top brass and all elected officials, wear them too ("Cameras on cops," Sept. 16). That would allow citizens to make sure that all of our employees are doing their jobs correctly. It would be really interesting to hear the conversations and see the goings on of all of them. It might also be interesting to see what firemen do all day long, or the trash collectors, or the road workers or teachers.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 9, 1991
McLEAN, Va. -- Gov. L. Douglas Wilder and Sen. Charles S. Robb, Virginia's two pre-eminent Democrats, are pummeling each other with such verbal ferocity that some party leaders and political analysts say they are endangering both their political futures and their party's dominance in Virginia.In the latest exchange, Mr. Wilder charged Friday that someone had taped personal calls he made on the cellular phone in his limousine and had passed on the contents of the conversations to Mr. Robb.
NEWS
By Karsonya Wise Whitehead | August 17, 2014
I would like to write my sons a love letter about peace and post-racial living, of a wonderful time when all people move freely, of a place where black bodies are not endangered and black life is not criminalized. But that is not my story, and it is not their reality. As much as I try, I cannot hide my frustration about what happened to Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., my disgust over what happened to Eric Garner in Staten Island, N.Y., my outrage over what happened to John Crawford III in Ohio, and my horror over what happened to Ezell Ford in Los Angeles, Calif.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | August 5, 2014
The land along the northern edge of the Patapsco serves as the front porch to a bejeweled coastline, the product of a re-making of Baltimore's Inner Harbor in a manner and to a degree that could have hardly been imagined a generation ago. And then, several blocks north, in the once commercially vibrant area of Waverly, standing in considerable contrast, there is McKenzie Elliott's front porch. When a three-year-old is shot to death while merely indulging in the act of sitting on her own front porch on a summer afternoon, the magnificence and grandeur of the renewal of our city is dimmed and diminished.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
If you told me a few years ago that I would be spending my vacation days talking to Congress, I would have thought you were out of your mind. But I ended up on Capitol Hill recently, lobbying with 600 other Americans from all walks of life. We went to converse with our senators and congressmen and congresswomen on both side of the aisle. We told them what we were concerned about, offered a simple solution and asked them what they thought. We listened to them and conversed with them about meeting on common ground.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
Rarely do drug traffickers pick up their phones and openly conduct their business, plainly stating the quantities of drugs they would like to buy and prices they would like to pay. Instead, they generally use coded language in an attempt to obscure their activities. And even when investigators think they know the meaning of the conversations they catch on wiretaps, they still have to convince a jury that they've interpreted the interactions correctly. The difficulty of that job was on display this month in the case of Danilo Garcia, who was accused of trafficking heroin from New York to Baltimore after a long surveillance operation.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
Singling out someone as the top player in any sport is never easy, and I certainly don't envy the task that awaits the Tewaaraton Foundation, which must choose from Loyola Maryland senior defenseman Joe Fletcher, Princeton senior midfielder Tom Schreiber, Albany junior attackman Lyle Thompson, Albany senior attackman Miles Thompson and Duke senior attackman Jordan Wolf as the winner of college lacrosse's version of the Heisman Trophy. But, as with any honor of this nature, there is bound to be some second-guessing.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews | April 29, 2014
Late in Quentin Tarantino's 1994 film "Pulp Fiction," Marsellus Wallace - a criminal boss played by Ving Rhames - banishes prizefighter Butch Coolidge (Bruce Willis) from Southern California, telling him "You lost all your L.A. privileges. " If only it were that easy to kick Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling out of L.A. There is simply no person, institution or network in today's Los Angeles with the clout to force powerful Angelenos to repent their sins - much less drive them out of town.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Del Quentin Wilber and Dana Hedgpeth and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1998
Attracting a throng of reporters and photographers to Ellicott City, New York literary agent Lucianne Goldberg testified for 1 1/2 hours yesterday before a Howard County grand jury, saying later she had turned over tapes of conversations involving her friend Linda R. Tripp.Goldberg, the highest-profile witness to appear before the grand jury investigating allegations that Tripp broke state wiretap law, insisted to reporters that "Linda did nothing illegal" in taping former White House intern Monica Lewinsky.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | December 3, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Congress is expanding a probe triggered b the State Department's search of Bill Clinton's passport file to find out if there was a more pervasive and systemic violation of privacy than has already been uncovered.The General Accounting Office, the congressional investigative arm, was asked this week to broaden a probe into secret monitoring of phone calls made by State Department employees.While the department insists that steps have been taken to correct the abuses, Rep. Howard Berman, D-Calif.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Gay rights advocates and the state legislator who introduced legislation this session to ban so-called "gay conversion therapy" in Maryland have withdrawn the bill, saying they will instead pursue regulatory oversight of the controversial practice. "If we can do this without legislation, I am all about it," said Baltimore County Del. John Cardin, the bill's sponsor, in a statement Friday. "I am not interested in the glory. I'm interested in solving problems. " Cardin's bill would have banned mental health professionals, but not unlicensed church clergy or therapists, from engaging in efforts to change a youth's sexual orientation or gender identity.
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