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NEWS
February 25, 2010
As I glanced at the headline of last Monday's article, "When terrorist and '60s child converge" (Feb. 22) by Susan Reimer, I thought that it would be yet another aged hippie opining about why America's enemies are justified. I was not disappointed. In some ways, she was right. Shows like "The Bachelor" and "The Real Housewives of Orange County," while entertaining, portray people whose hot tubs far surpass their character in terms of depth. I am ashamed to have seen shows that match "The Bachelor" in mindless entertainment, but does this mean that I should be wiped from the face of the earth by the likes of the underwear bomber?
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Baltimore, don't be surprised if you see bunny ears around town this weekend. About 100 former Playboy "Bunnies" will converge on Baltimore for a reunion. The women, who generally meet up every other year, worked as waitresses and hostesses at what was once a national chain of Playboy Clubs, donning silk leotards, bunny ears, tails and three-inch heels to serve customers. Some of the Bunnies also became Playboy magazine centerfolds. "It was the hardest job I ever had," said Marsha Flynn, a nurse practitioner from St. Louis who organized the reunion.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2000
Some of Baltimore's most driven artists rolled into their exhibit at the Artscape festival yesterday morning in a conspicuous display of the auto-exotic. Members of a small but dedicated "artcar" subculture arrived in a caravan, 15 strong, at their reserved parking spaces in front of the Lyric Opera House, seated inside their works of art. They represent the core of a group of perhaps two dozen area artists, both amateur and professional, who have used coupes as their canvas or turned minivans into their masterpieces.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
What's 6,000 mathematicians, multiplied by 2,500 talks, divided over four days? The nation's largest gathering devoted to the science - and art - of math. The annual Joint Mathematics Meetings is gathering in Baltimore this week for the first time in a decade. Running through Saturday at the Baltimore Convention Center, it is organized by the country's two major professional groups for mathematicians and includes smaller meetings of other mathematical societies. Attendees come from as far as Korea, Brazil and Iran.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2007
One by one last summer, the bodies of four women were found in remote areas of Harford County, dumped in grassy fields in a largely rural county that typically registers only a handful of killings each year. Then came more shocking news: Police thought the deaths might have been the work of one person. Jury selection began yesterday in a Bel Air courtroom in the trial of a 35-year-old laborer charged with first-degree murder in the killing of the first woman found. He is also charged separately in the sexual assaults of six more women.
NEWS
October 8, 1991
Travelers who pass through rail or bus terminals in major cities like New York and San Francisco cannot fail to be struck by the large number of homeless people who have taken shelter there -- a concentration of human misery that grew alarmingly during the past decade.Baltimore, luckily, may get a jump on the problem before it reaches epidemic proportions. The federal Department of Transportation recently awarded the city a $600,000 grant to help it cope with the homeless influx around the busy Lexington and Howard street subway and bus stops.
NEWS
By DAVID RITCHIE | July 27, 1991
Stand for a few minutes some mild Sunday morning at a bus stopin the Mount Vernon neighborhood, and the panhandlers converge. Then you hear a whining voice: ''Excuuuuse meeeee, sorrrrrr . . .''You can ignore the beggar or give him change. A more instructive approach is to buy him a meal and hear his story.Some panhandlers come across as glib liars, spinning spurious tales of woe. I recall one ''disabled'' beggar whose alleged disability left him looking fit and well-fed, and even allowed him to flirt with waitresses.
NEWS
By RICHARD LOUV | February 16, 1994
O thou, the early author of myblood,/!Whose youthful spirit, in meregenerate.Doth with his lofty and)shrill-sounding throatAwake the snorting like a horse.--Text generated with artificial intelligence, from what computer scientists call ''the Shakespeare corpus.''San Diego.--Sometimes worlds converge, explode and create new one. Lately, I have been wondering what will happen when the worlds of high definition television (or, better yet, the three-dimensional hologram), digital sound, artificial intelligence and theories of virtual reality converge with the yearnings of the human heart.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 14, 2000
Photography since 1970 has been dominated by two contradictory trends: one toward the "straight" tradition of modernist realism, the other toward the subversive, debunking pastiches of postmodernism. James Welling, whose meditative photographs of commonplace objects and everyday scenes are the subject of a major retrospective exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art, straddles the divide between these conflicting impulses with a serenity that seems completely natural and unforced. The exhibit covers Welling's work between 1974 and 1999, the equivalent of several photographic lifetimes for many fine art photographers, who usually can be expected to produce only about a decade's worth of truly original work during their careers.
FEATURES
By Larry Lipman and Larry Lipman,Cox News Service | January 2, 1994
Three rivers run through it, and from their waters you can gauge modern Pittsburgh.Once these rivers were the polluted receptacles of millions of tons of industrial waste. Their waters carried steel and coal around the world.Now the waters sparkle. Pleasure boats slice down one river and up the next. Elaborate, old-fashioned clippers carry sightseers and party groups.The story of Pittsburgh can be told in one small room -- the visitors center at the top of the Duquesne Incline.For flatlanders to appreciate an incline, you have to know a bit about Pittsburgh's geography.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
Brace yourself for the epic convergence of two holidays - a celebration of rich dishes, piles of sweets and family togetherness the likes of which have never before been seen and won't be repeated for more than 77,000 years. Thanksgivukkah is coming. Latkes with cranberry sauce. Turkey-shaped menorahs. Cornucopias stuffed with dreidels. Thanks to quirks of the Jewish and Gregorian calendars, Hanukkah and Thanksgiving will coincide this month for the first time since 1888, back when celebrations of both holidays were more muted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Anthony Landi, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Robbi Behr, 37, and Matthew Swanson, 38, specialize in what they call "odd, commercially nonviable picture books for adults. " The married couple quit their office jobs seven years ago to operate Idiots'books, a small, indie publishing house based out of their barn on the Eastern Shore. There, they write and illustrate their series of satirical, subscription-based novels, which they proudly displayed Friday at the Baltimore Book Festival in Mount Vernon. "Festivals like these are the best way to meet new readers," Swanson said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Adam Gutekunst and Dustin Levy and For The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Hundreds of "My Little Pony" collectibles cover Steve Lucia's bedroom - plush toys, comic books, trading cards and T-shirts. It is a sea of pink and purple, a shrine to a TV show originally intended for young girls. But Lucia is a 25-year-old man, an electrician who lives in a Pasadena duplex and has what he calls a "healthy obsession. " "Being in the construction industry, there are guys who sit around and talk about women all day long," Lucia said. "I go home and wrap myself in ponies.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
For most of the summer, Nick Wiesing, 14, spends his time working on a farm near central New York. His new friend, Patrick Higgins, 18, would spend a typical week working at a senior living center or relaxing in the air conditioning at his house in Pennsylvania. This summer, though, they both spent a week of their vacation in Anne Arundel County renovating a home in Brooklyn Park by day and sleeping on the floor of a Severn church by night. They're among more than 300 teens who converged on Anne Arundel last week on a Christian mission to help others through home repairs.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Some were first-timers, others veterans. Under Baltimore's Washington Monument Thursday night, thousands gathered for carols, food truck carryout and a bit of light-hearted - if jam-packed - holiday camaraderie. At the 41st annual lighting of the monument, another winter season in Charm City was launched - kids and teens, young adults and older couples all looking skyward as the strings of lights were turned on, lasers shot patterns across Mount Vernon's trees and a finale of fireworks burst into the air, all to the accompaniment of holiday musical classics.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
Greg LaRocque has been drawing comic books for more than 30 years, part of a love affair with the medium that dates to 1961, when Marvel's Fantastic Four first appeared on newsstands. Michael Bracco, on the other hand, didn't start appreciating comics until he was a student at the Maryland Institute College of Art about a dozen years ago. This weekend, the two Baltimore-area artists will be among nearly 500 comic-book creators gathering for the annual Baltimore Comic-Con. Saturday and Sunday, they'll meet and greet, discuss their art, and maybe even sketch a character or two for fans to frame and hang on the wall.
NEWS
December 1, 2002
FORMER MAYOR Gerald Johnson - voted out of office this year after 12 years of growing the central Maryland town of Mount Airy - sits on the porch of his neat rancher in what once was a field, takes in the palpable hum from the Route 27 rush hour just beyond the nearby Wal-Mart, and proclaims with far more pride than irony: "Mount Airy is like that movie, Field of Dreams. ... `If you build it, they will come.'" And come they have. At the vortex of Maryland's ex-urban growth pressures - where Carroll, Frederick, Howard and Montgomery counties converge - this pastoral ridgetop has lured settlers for 170 years, by wagon, rail, Route 40 and Interstate 70. But in the last 40 years, Mount Airy more than doubled its acreage via repeated annexations, rocketing from 600 residents to more than 7,500 - with another 24,000 in developments haphazardly strewn across the rolling countryside within five miles.
TOPIC
By Marilyn Geewax | January 28, 2001
WASHINGTON -- It's Super Bowl Sunday in 2005, and kickoff is just minutes away. With remote controls in hand, millions of Americans are legally placing bets on the game via the Internet, without ever taking their eyes off their TV sets. At least, that's the dream of online gaming companies. If you combine the excitement of live sports with the convenience of betting through "interactive television," online gambling will explode, many experts say. "I think it's unstoppable," said Peter Childs, a spokesman for Sportsbook.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2012
Summer arrives at 7:09 p.m on Wednesday. Hilariously, 98 degree weather is due to arrive at the exact same time. June 20 is National Vanilla Milkshake Day. It just is. How about an Abbey Burger Bistro shake made with Gifford's vanilla ice cream, Berger cookies, Stoli vanilla and Godiva liqueur? Or you could take on the six-pound milkshake Chick & Ruth's Delly in Annapolis, part of the restaurants Man Vs. Food Challenge . (There's a one-pound burger, too.) Pictures: Great Maryland milkshakes Or, you could head to a participating Rita's , where regular size Rita's Italian Ices are $2 all day long on June 20. Price does not include sales tax.  
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2012
Not even getting stabbed repeatedly by a needle could get Danielle Cromb to put down her smartphone Saturday afternoon. "I've been on Tumblr, Facebook, Pinterest," said Cromb, of Charleston, S.C., who clutched her iPhone as she was having ink injected into the skin on the back of her neck. "Mostly it's helpful if I'm looking up a picture in the middle of a conversation with an artist. And it can definitely be a distraction. " It is a common sight this weekend inside the Baltimore Convention Center: Semi-dressed, prostrate people playing games, texting and listening to music on their cellphones as tattoo artists work.
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