Advertisement
HomeCollectionsConventional Weapons
IN THE NEWS

Conventional Weapons

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | February 2, 1991
LONDON -- Vice President Dan Quayle refused yesterday to rule out U.S. use of nuclear weapons in the gulf war, and said he anticipated that the Iraqis would fire chemical weapons."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alexander Artem Sakharov | November 29, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Twenty-five years ago, a Reagan administration official asked my opinion on whether America was facing a clear and present danger from Russia. I said no. Despite the heated rhetoric on both sides, the Russians never intended to initiate an attack on the West, their strategic objective being to split Europe from the U.S. On the other hand, their fear of being attacked was countered, even in the face of President Ronald Reagan's hostility, by their faith in America's common sense.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - Faced with a potential arms control setback, the Clinton administration threatened yesterday to slap economic sanctions on Russia in retaliation for Moscow's decision to renew the sale of tanks, nautical mines and other conventional weapons to Iran. The move came in response to a confidential dispatch sent by Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov to Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright this month. In the note, Ivanov said that after Dec. 1 Moscow would no longer observe its 1995 agreement to phase out Iranian arms sales, said an administration official who spoke on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 10, 2003
SEOUL, South Korea - In one of its bluntest statements yet about its nuclear program, North Korea said yesterday that it is developing nuclear weapons to reduce the size and cost of its conventional armed forces. The statement, distributed by the North's official news service in the capital, Pyongyang, was unusual in that it alluded to the economic difficulties of the isolated communist state and in that it included an unequivocal admission that the nation has a nuclear program. When U.S. officials reported last fall that North Korea had a clandestine nuclear program, the North Koreans said it was designed only to generate electricity.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 26, 2000
WASHINGTON - State Department officials told Congress yesterday that a 1995 deal approved by Vice President Al Gore allowing Russia to sell a large cache of conventional weapons to Iran was legal and did not threaten American security. The agreement, signed in 1995 by Gore and Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, the former Russian prime minister, exempted Russia from a 1992 law requiring that economic sanctions be imposed on countries that sell arms to nations that sponsor terrorism, including Iran.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 29, 1991
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein said in an interview reported from Baghdad yesterday that Iraq had maintained its balance in the war thus far by using only conventional weapons, but that his missiles could deliver chemical, biological and nuclear weapons.He suggested they would be used if necessary to preserve his nation.In his first interview with a Western reporter since the war began on Jan. 17, the Iraqi president told CNN correspondent Peter Arnett that allied air superiority had failed and insisted that Iraq would win the war, although he declined to predict the length of the fight.
NEWS
By Jennifer Washburn | July 23, 1996
WASHINGTON -- For all the heated talk about curbing gun sales at home, neither Bob Dole nor Bill Clinton has said a word in their campaigns about the worldwide proliferation of conventional weapons -- let alone the U.S. role as the world's number-one arms dealer. That could change under a proposal by Sen. Mark Hatfield, R-Ore., for a ''code of conduct'' to rein in U.S. arms exports.Most Americans would be shocked to discover that 85 percent of U.S. weapons are sold to countries the State Department deems undemocratic, such as Saudi Arabia and Indonesia.
NEWS
August 11, 1998
The Chicago Tribune said in an editorial Friday:AMONG the world's most astute observers of U.S. politics are Saddam Hussein and the members of his ruling clique in Iraq. So it was no accident that on Thursday, as Monica Lewinsky was doing her star turn before Kenneth Starr's grand jury, Iraq was bringing to crisis its latest challenge to the United Nations' weapons inspection program and the American-led coalition that has supported it.Mr. Saddam sensed weakness at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. and, predictably, decided to exploit it. Who says character doesn't count?
NEWS
By Tom Wicker | October 4, 1991
WATCHING President Bush announce those sweeping nuclear weapons reductions and restraints last week -- some of which seemed beyond hope a year ago -- I had mixed but largely jubilant feelings.To one of my generation -- whose memories of the Cuban missile and Berlin crises are clear and traumatic -- these changes seemed at least as remarkable as those that have engulfed the Soviet Union.My generation had, after all, lived our adult lives in the constant awareness not only of the Cold War but of the mushroom cloud.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | February 25, 1994
Geneva. -- Imagine a weapon that would inflict terrible war wounds, that makes no sound, that can be fired from the hip without particular accuracy and that can hit its target a half a mile away.Imagine, too, that this weapon were not just in the hands of your regular army but the a la mode weapon for guerrilla forces, mafia and drug gangs and terrorist groups.Let me introduce, not the weapon of the fantastic future, but one that is soon to start coming off the mass-production line -- the laser rifle.
NEWS
By Wade Boese | February 7, 2003
WASHINGTON - If it comes to war in Iraq, President Bush should heed the example set by his father before the 1991 Persian Gulf war and rule out the possible use of nuclear weapons. The elder Bush did not want to become the second president in history to order a nuclear attack, and neither should his son. Yet there is evidence that the current administration is wrongly seeking to blur the decades-old distinction between nuclear and conventional weapons as it contemplates contingencies for using nuclear weapons on the battlefield.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - Faced with a potential arms control setback, the Clinton administration threatened yesterday to slap economic sanctions on Russia in retaliation for Moscow's decision to renew the sale of tanks, nautical mines and other conventional weapons to Iran. The move came in response to a confidential dispatch sent by Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov to Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright this month. In the note, Ivanov said that after Dec. 1 Moscow would no longer observe its 1995 agreement to phase out Iranian arms sales, said an administration official who spoke on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 26, 2000
WASHINGTON - State Department officials told Congress yesterday that a 1995 deal approved by Vice President Al Gore allowing Russia to sell a large cache of conventional weapons to Iran was legal and did not threaten American security. The agreement, signed in 1995 by Gore and Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, the former Russian prime minister, exempted Russia from a 1992 law requiring that economic sanctions be imposed on countries that sell arms to nations that sponsor terrorism, including Iran.
NEWS
August 11, 1998
The Chicago Tribune said in an editorial Friday:AMONG the world's most astute observers of U.S. politics are Saddam Hussein and the members of his ruling clique in Iraq. So it was no accident that on Thursday, as Monica Lewinsky was doing her star turn before Kenneth Starr's grand jury, Iraq was bringing to crisis its latest challenge to the United Nations' weapons inspection program and the American-led coalition that has supported it.Mr. Saddam sensed weakness at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. and, predictably, decided to exploit it. Who says character doesn't count?
NEWS
By Jennifer Washburn | July 23, 1996
WASHINGTON -- For all the heated talk about curbing gun sales at home, neither Bob Dole nor Bill Clinton has said a word in their campaigns about the worldwide proliferation of conventional weapons -- let alone the U.S. role as the world's number-one arms dealer. That could change under a proposal by Sen. Mark Hatfield, R-Ore., for a ''code of conduct'' to rein in U.S. arms exports.Most Americans would be shocked to discover that 85 percent of U.S. weapons are sold to countries the State Department deems undemocratic, such as Saudi Arabia and Indonesia.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | February 25, 1994
Geneva. -- Imagine a weapon that would inflict terrible war wounds, that makes no sound, that can be fired from the hip without particular accuracy and that can hit its target a half a mile away.Imagine, too, that this weapon were not just in the hands of your regular army but the a la mode weapon for guerrilla forces, mafia and drug gangs and terrorist groups.Let me introduce, not the weapon of the fantastic future, but one that is soon to start coming off the mass-production line -- the laser rifle.
NEWS
By Wade Boese | February 7, 2003
WASHINGTON - If it comes to war in Iraq, President Bush should heed the example set by his father before the 1991 Persian Gulf war and rule out the possible use of nuclear weapons. The elder Bush did not want to become the second president in history to order a nuclear attack, and neither should his son. Yet there is evidence that the current administration is wrongly seeking to blur the decades-old distinction between nuclear and conventional weapons as it contemplates contingencies for using nuclear weapons on the battlefield.
NEWS
By Linda Geeson | January 24, 1991
* ADVERSARY: An enemy or foe.AIR RAID SIREN: A loud alarm sounded to warn people that an attack may be coming. In Baltimore, air raid sirens installed during World War II are tested every Monday at 1 p.m.D6* AIR STRIKE: An attack by planes dropping bombs.* ALLIES: Countries joined for a common purpose. In the Persian Gulf War, the United States, Kuwait, France, England, Egypt, Syria, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia are allies in the fight against Iraq.* AMPHIBIOUS: In nature, creatures that can live equally well on land or in water.
NEWS
By Tom Wicker | October 4, 1991
WATCHING President Bush announce those sweeping nuclear weapons reductions and restraints last week -- some of which seemed beyond hope a year ago -- I had mixed but largely jubilant feelings.To one of my generation -- whose memories of the Cuban missile and Berlin crises are clear and traumatic -- these changes seemed at least as remarkable as those that have engulfed the Soviet Union.My generation had, after all, lived our adult lives in the constant awareness not only of the Cold War but of the mushroom cloud.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | February 2, 1991
LONDON -- Vice President Dan Quayle refused yesterday to rule out U.S. use of nuclear weapons in the gulf war, and said he anticipated that the Iraqis would fire chemical weapons."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.