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Convention Headquarters Hotel

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BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | December 23, 2005
Baltimore's proposed $305 million convention headquarters hotel won a key approval yesterday from a city design panel. After more than a year of scrutiny, the city's Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel gave final approval to the design by RTKL Associates for a 19-story, L-shaped tower that is to have 756 rooms, 62,000 square feet of meeting space and 550 parking spaces and alter the city skyline near Camden Yards and the Baltimore Convention Center....
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 19, 2013
The mayor of Baltimore does not want to be on the wrong side of history this time, so she fully supports $107 million in tax increment financing to aid the development of Harbor Point, that big slab of old, chromium-saturated land adjacent to Harbor East — you know, Doughville, the upscale city-within-the-city developed by bread magnate John Paterakis. Apparently, Stephanie Rawlings-Blake regrets the vote she cast 15 years ago against giving a substantial tax break to Paterakis, the wealthy and politically influential owner of H&S Bakery and developer of Harbor East.
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NEWS
August 9, 1999
WRECKING czar Buzz Berg has begun dismantling the Southern Hotel, a long-vacant 1914 landmark at Light and Baltimore streets. A $120 million, 35-story skyscraper, with a 267-room Embassy Suites hotel, office and retail space, will rise in its place.Mr. Berg's appearance marks a significant step forward in developer J. Joseph Clarke's dream for the site in the heart of the financial district, just steps from the Inner Harbor and the Charles Center Metro station.Across the street at Light and Redwood, Bethesda-based developer Donald J. Urgo wants to demolish two old bank and insurance buildings to make room for a 125-room Marriott Residence Inn extended-stay hotel.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
The city-owned Hilton Baltimore Convention Center Hotel performed better in its second full year of operation than in its first, but officials warned that the slow economic recovery means several more years could pass before it turns a profit. In terms of cash flow, the 757-room hotel on Pratt Street ended 2010 "slightly above break-even," with $9.7 million on hand at the end of the year, compared with $8.4 million at the beginning, according to a financial statement provided this month to the city's Board of Estimates.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2002
A convention headquarters hotel proposed for Baltimore could put the city in the running for convention business previously out of reach, but the addition of 750 hotel rooms to the city's lodging supply also would likely squeeze existing downtown hotels, at least initially, experts said yesterday. The proposed Hilton, if built, could later be expanded to 1,000 or more rooms if demand warranted. "In the short term, there's going to be probably some cannibalization on existing hotels," said Chekitan S. Dev, an associate professor of marketing in the School of Hotel Administration at Cornell University.
NEWS
September 23, 1997
The date for a community meeting on the three plans for a convention headquarters hotel in Baltimore was incorrect in yesterday's editions.The meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sept. 30 at St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church, 120 N. Front St.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 9/23/97
NEWS
June 8, 1997
WHAT STARTED AS Baltimore City's search for a publicly subsidized convention headquarters hotel has taken yet another odd twist. Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke says his "preference" now is to have about 2,000 new rooms by the year 2002, a goal that might involve building three additional hotels of varying sizes."
NEWS
December 22, 1997
COMPETITORS ARE laughing at Baltimore's clumsy attempts to increase hotel capacity. While Philadelphia rushes to add hotel rooms next to its expanded convention center, Baltimore is bogged down in a politicized football game that has yet to produce a convention headquarters hotel.The board of the Baltimore Development Corp., the mayor's economic development arm, last week approved tax abatement and profit-sharing concepts for the Inner Harbor East Wyndham hotel. Once the administration completes the legal work, the City Council will receive the financing package for that taxpayer-subsidized, 750-room complex proposed by political rainmaker John Paterakis.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 7, 1997
Hoping to stop development of any hotel linked to the Baltimore Convention Center, the New York developer who wants to build a Westin on Pratt Street plans to offer to buy the city-owned site where Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos has proposed an 850-room Grand Hyatt.Harvey Schulweis, whose Schulweis Realty Inc. controls the former News American site, confirmed yesterday that he plans to offer the city at least $10 million for the 4-acre Camden Yards parking lots, for which the city is seeking development proposals.
NEWS
February 19, 2001
THE 750-ROOM Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, which opened last week, is a tribute to the assiduity of one man, John Paterakis Sr. The bakery magnate insisted on the waterfront location, south of Little Italy. The endless millions it took to build the four-star hotel came from his pocket. Or as he brashly told an associate: "If we blow it, it's my kids' money anyway." This newspaper railed against the Paterakis proposal. We thought the Baltimore Development Corp. made a mistake in endorsing a location that was so far from the Convention Center.
NEWS
May 24, 2006
The Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association rolls out its new campaign today to sell the city as a secret worth getting in on. There's plenty to share about Baltimore: its hospitality, cultural attractions, conviviality, entertainment venues and accessibility. But the pitch can't target only tourists; it must entice convention and meeting planners if the city's convention business is to thrive. The BACVA professionals know this. That's why, within 24 hours of unveiling their new slogan and branding campaign, they will be promoting the city under the "Baltimore - Get In On It" banner at the Greater Washington Society of Association Executives, a big industry trade show with the potential to score convention business.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA AND JUNE ARNEY and LORRAINE MIRABELLA AND JUNE ARNEY,SUN REPORTERS | January 20, 2006
Baltimore's planned $305 million convention headquarters hotel will carry risks such as operating in an intensely competitive environment while depending upon increased attendance at the city's flagging convention center, the debt rating agency Standard & Poor's said yesterday. But even in a down market, the rating service said, the city should be able to repay the $301.7 million revenue bonds the city expects to sell next week to finance the publicly owned 756-room hotel. The new, 19-story Hilton will be built by 2008 on two lots bounded by Howard, Camden, Paca and Pratt streets and will connect to the Baltimore Convention Center.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | December 23, 2005
Baltimore's proposed $305 million convention headquarters hotel won a key approval yesterday from a city design panel. After more than a year of scrutiny, the city's Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel gave final approval to the design by RTKL Associates for a 19-story, L-shaped tower that is to have 756 rooms, 62,000 square feet of meeting space and 550 parking spaces and alter the city skyline near Camden Yards and the Baltimore Convention Center....
NEWS
By JUNE ARNEY and JUNE ARNEY,SUN REPORTER | November 28, 2005
As Baltimore pushes ahead with its campaign to build a publicly financed convention headquarters hotel, a private building boom is adding thousands of rooms to the region's supply. More than 1,000 new hotel rooms have opened in the two years since city officials unveiled plans for a 752-room Hilton on a site just north of Oriole Park at Camden Yards. Another 2,000 are in the pipeline in Baltimore's downtown and around Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. The publicly financed convention hotel, expected to cost as much as $305 million, has long been promoted as the savior of the flagging Baltimore Convention Center, which never lived up to projections since reopening in 1997 after a $151 million expansion that tripled its exhibit space.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2005
Baltimore officials plan to introduce legislation Monday seeking City Council approval to issue up to $305 million in revenue bonds for a convention headquarters hotel that would be developed and owned by the city. In a lengthy briefing with council members yesterday, a phalanx of city development, tourism and finance officials as well as financial advisers and consultants defended the plan to publicly finance the proposed 752-room Hilton, which they said was essential to boost the Baltimore Convention Center's sagging bookings amid stiff national competition.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2004
Baltimore is forging ahead with a proposed publicly financed convention headquarters hotel - one of the costliest projects ever undertaken by the city - at a time when the convention center's future business is sagging and new competitors are posing an increased threat. As the city's economic development arm pushes to sell $290 million in tax-exempt bonds to finance a 750-room Hilton, convention center bookings are set to plummet by nearly half in 2006 and sink over the next several years, with just four groups signed up for 2009 - well within the booking window for major conventions.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 2, 2004
WAIT A minute. Time out. Stop the world. I need to go back a week, to Thanksgiving, to take another look at something that appeared on the front page of this newspaper that day: City to seek millions more for hotel plan. Did you see that? I know: another hotel story. But this wasn't just another installment in Baltimore's long, tortured effort to get a convention "headquarters" hotel next to the convention center so that we can have thousands of square dancers, turf growers, pediatricians, Republicans and Democrats come to town for huge conventions.
NEWS
June 4, 1997
TODAY, House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. and Appropriations Committee chair Del. Howard P. Rawlings are scheduled to tour the various possible sites for a new publicly subsidized convention headquarters hotel in Baltimore.We urge them to take a thorough look -- and do lots of walking. Much taxpayer money is at risk since developers are expected to seek up to $40 million in tax breaks and direct public subsidies for a new hotel. If the wrong site is selected, it will hurt already lagging bookings at the Convention Center, which was recently expanded by the state at a cost of $150 million.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 2, 2004
WAIT A minute. Time out. Stop the world. I need to go back a week, to Thanksgiving, to take another look at something that appeared on the front page of this newspaper that day: City to seek millions more for hotel plan. Did you see that? I know: another hotel story. But this wasn't just another installment in Baltimore's long, tortured effort to get a convention "headquarters" hotel next to the convention center so that we can have thousands of square dancers, turf growers, pediatricians, Republicans and Democrats come to town for huge conventions.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2003
After years of fudged numbers that led to a top-level shake-up at Baltimore's convention and visitors bureau, the group's new leader told a gathering of hotel and restaurant executives yesterday that she will bring more accountability to the agency. Leslie R. Doggett, at her first public event since being hired as president and chief executive officer, pledged quarterly reports about meetings brought to town, future hotel room bookings, leisure inquiries and lost business. She also unveiled a new mission statement for her organization, vowed to hold regular town hall-style forums and promised to rebrand Baltimore.
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